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Building for everyone: how to use tech to change the world

Phillip Atiba Goff
Co-founder and president at Center for Policing Equity (CPE)
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2018 Google I/O
May 9, 2018, Mountain View, USA
2018 Google I/O
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Building for everyone: how to use tech to change the world
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About speakers

Phillip Atiba Goff
Co-founder and president at Center for Policing Equity (CPE)
Alex Bernadotte
Founder and CEO at Beyond 12
Jacquelline Fuller
President at Google.org
Oliver Hurst-Hiller
Expert at DonorsChoose.org
Jess Ladd
Founder and CEO at Callisto

Phillip Atiba Goff, Ph.D is the inaugural Franklin A. Thomas Professor in Policing Equity at John Jay College of Criminal Justice. He is the co-founder and president of the Center for Policing Equity (CPE), and an expert in contemporary forms of racial bias and discrimination, as well as the intersections of race and gender. Dr. Goff serves as one of four Principal Investigators for the CPE’s National Justice Database, the first national database on racial disparities in police stops and use of force. More

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Alex Bernadotte is the founder and CEO of Beyond 12, a high tech, high touch nonprofit that integrates personalized coaching for students with intelligent technology for high schools and colleges to increase the number of traditionally underserved students who graduate from college. She has more than 16 years of executive management and strategic development experience in both the nonprofit and private sectors. Before creating Beyond 12, she served as an Associate Partner at NewSchools Venture Fund. In 2009

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Jacquelline Fuller is President of Google.org, a data-driven, human-focused philanthropy powered by Google. Her team invests more than $200 million yearly to support innovative nonprofits who are using technology to create more opportunities for everyone to learn, succeed, and be heard. Jacquelline joined Google in 2007 and manages a global team overseeing Google’s philanthropic work, product donations and employee giving and volunteering. Jacquelline previously served as Deputy Director of Global Health at

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Oliver is responsible for the technology and user experience that power DonorsChoose.org's unique philanthropic marketplace. During his tenure, the org has gathered $675MM+ in donations from 3M+ donors to help 27M+ students. Teachers at more than 78% of America's public schools have posted projects on the site. Fast Company named DonorsChoose.org one of the World's 50 Most Innovative Companies. Prior to joining the team in 2006, Oliver managed product engineering projects for Microsoft's new search engine,

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Jess Ladd is the Founder and CEO of Callisto. Jess has been honored as a TED Fellow, a Fearless Changemaker by the Case Foundation, and an Emerging Innovator by Ashoka and American Express. Most recently, Jess was the recipient of a 2018 Skoll Foundation Award for Social Entrepreneurship. Before founding Callisto, Jess founded a series of online services for STD prevention and control in addition to The Social Innovation Lab in Baltimore. She worked in the White House Office of National AIDS Policy, as a Pu

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About the talk

In this Keynote Session, Google.org’s Jacquelline Fuller talks to a group of technologists who are building tools for causes they care deeply about, in order to help them achieve their mission through technology. Learn how you can get involved and build products that have a broad social impact.

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Welcome everyone. Thanks so much for joining us. I'm Jacqueline Fuller and I'm the president of google.org anthropy and we focus on exactly the topic of today's session building for everyone using Tech to change the world google.org invests money as well as our googlers the time of our googlers, especially our Tech googlers, you might have heard Sundar mentioned recently that we're investing a billion dollars over the next five years and google.org so we can help find

and fun some of the best innovators around the world who are using technology and really clever ways to change the world. And today today. We're going to meet a few of our partners grantees who are doing exactly that so why don't we start by just hearing a little bit about each one? View I'm and telling your story maybe Jess we can start with you. And if you could give us just maybe a sentence on who you are personally how you came to this issue and maybe a sentence about the problem and then a sentence about with a solution looks

like great. Hi, my name is just glad and I'm the founder and CEO of Callisto. Callisto is a online sexual misconduct reporting platform that helps find serial offenders so that if a victim of sexual misconduct doesn't want to come forward unless they know that there's another person we connect them with other victims in with their options for taking action to protect our community and I came to this work because I was sexually assaulted in college and I went through the reporting process and I ended up finding the active reporting to be

more traumatic than the assault. So trying to figure out how and somebody has faced something like that. They can use a system that actually rebuilds their sense of agency and empowerment rather than taking it away all over again and ultimately helps find and and stop to go to the serial offenders, but all offenders and create a real deterrent towards this type of behavior towards other human beings and we launched Kalisto 3 years ago on college campuses and this summer we're expanding it to address sexual assault and coercion in the tech industry.

Alright. Thanks Alex. Right, right. Hi, I'm Oliver hersteller. I run engineering and product at donorschoose.org. Thank you to Jacqueline and groove. Org for hosting us today. Honored to be up here with these other social entrepreneur changemakers. Donorschoose.org. We are like Kickstarter or GoFundMe accept it were a nonprofit and we're focused exclusively on schools public schools here in the US teachers bring their best ideas to our website for things they want to do with their classroom for their classroom that their schools

can't otherwise afford and we helped bring the dollars to those projects to help bring them to life at 80% of the schools in the US are teacher whose used our website. We're really excited about that reach because there's about a hundred thousand public schools in the US more than a million classroom projects have been funded on the site delivering resources to about 28 million public school students and the dollars have come from more than 3 million donors who in total have given almost seven hundred million dollars to classrooms through Novation

alright. Hello everyone. My name is Alex. And I'm the founder and CEO organization called Beyond 12. We are a High-Tech high touch coaching platform at our mission is to significantly increase the number of students from low-income communities who graduate for my Nations colleges and universities. And like I said, we do that to a coaching platform both a human a virtual human coach that we hire recent college graduates who themselves with the first of their families to go to college. So they understand firsthand the challenges that are students are facing

on their road to a college graduation on the road to a college degree and repair our human coaches with a mobile app called my coach where we've downloaded the academic and financial aid calendars of the colleges and universities that students are attending we synthesize the data into a an interactive comprehensive to-do list for them that we augment with customized evidence-based push notifications and Duchess to remind them. Activities deadlines and behaviors that lead to success and on the back and we haven't analytics pension that's powered by Machine learning that allows us to

predict which students need our help and when and prescribe the right type of support by the human digital or both will it be to be so we work with high schools and colleges were currently serving about 50,000 students at on our way to solving a million students by 2025. I started be on 12 in large part because of the challenges I face is a first-generation college door. So I was born in Port-au-Prince Haiti. I grew up in inner-city Boston. I was the first person in my family to go to college. We try to Hanover New Hampshire because I landed at Dartmouth thinking that the most difficult

part of the journey was behind us and we thought we had made it when we got that acceptance letter. We thought we won the lottery. This is it as you can imagine because of the work that I do it wasn't it? I completely bombed my freshman year academically and socially emotionally and discover that getting it was only the first. Luckily I was able Turn things around I did get my degree watch a grad school out here at Stanford. But each year about 700,000 students with backgrounds and stories similar to mine and bark on their college dirties believing that they're prepared for the road ahead.

But the statistics tell us that only 9% of students from low-income communities can expect to earn a bachelor's degree by their mid-twenties versus 77% of their hiring come here. So we are hoping to change those statistics through a combination of human and Technology solution. All right. Do hope I am Phillip atiba Goff. I am the co-founder and president of the center for policing Equity my story in the house. He became about I was born at a very young age. So it was probably

skip ahead a little bit one sentence, and we do it at the house of law enforcement. I know that might time sounds strange, but it's absolutely the case that many folks in law enforcement from out of the country by asking for help to reduce the racial disparities and what they're doing that becomes really hard when you don't have data on it. So we started in 2012 the national just as database that is the first and the largest standardized database of sleep Behavior. We all cover about a third of

the United States by population. And here's the amazing thing when we get numbers if we can hold people accountable to actual value might the hard part now is getting that data to be cleaned getting a Standardized that takes a lot of time it takes human beings every single Department about 9 to 12 months to standardize it and I'll audited and analyze it but with the help of our Google engineer, we were just at about 9 to 12 Days in the last year or try to get to nine to 12 minutes by the end of this year and when we got when we get there, we can measure not just disparities but actual

bias like a part of the disparities that belongs to law enforcement policy and individual and with that just like they do with all the other stats on crime stats on public welfare. They can hold themselves accountable to it and reduce the disparities and the burdensome this on each of those communities. So that's the ways in which we can get Behavioral Science. We call it the Justice nerds to connect come by with tech that be the Justice Geeks and we can do great cool things awesome. Well, I think you can see that we've

got Heroes amongst us who are day-in-and-day-out using technology to change the world and you know what they need people like you so we're going to have opportunities for interaction with them after the session. If you would like to get to know them better know there were maybe even volunteer with them, but why do I dig in a little bit and go back to the technology itself? And if you'd be willing just to speak a bit about exactly what you're doing from a technology perspective that you think might be interesting to this audience feel kind of kicked us off Alex. Do you want to Tell us what

you all are doing. Yeah, absolutely just a follow-up on sort of our solution. So we're trying to solve the issue of college success and we believe that there is both a human and a technology solution for it. Right? And I know that I might be in this room where we believe that there's an app for everything. We believe that there is an also a nap but for us technology is the amplifier of our humans by thought we had human coaches and we were trying to figure out how do you amplify the support that they are providing to students? And what's the best way for us to do that until we

build a platform that allows us to do that. So we haven't completely removed our humans, but we are making our humans most effective and really trying to figure out what are the aspects of student support that can be automated and digitized right the navigational and the transactional can be digitized an automated and what are the aspects of students support that are uniquely human and We've heard from students. Those are the inspirational right and so do I belong here at my college material? I'm having challenges and struggles. So we've built a solution that allows us to

distinguish between those kinds of supports right and offer a just-in-time solution for students. And on the back end. This is a really important piece. If we are going to get to the point where we're serving millions of student annual leave. We needed a solution that allowed us to predict which students needed our help and when and then prescribe the right type of support. So that's how we're incorporating machine learning in 2 hours solution to do a live a little bit of the predictive and the prescriptive modeling that allows us to scale our efforts so that we can serve students but also

so that we can provide them with the exact type of support that they need at the moment that they needed to prevent them from dropping out. Great Oliver, how about you example of how are applying technology also in the machine learning Arena, but first some things about donorschoose.org that some folks may not knowing that are not typical in the crowdfunding world first on the Fulfillment side. When a project on our website reaches its gold all the funding. It needed 600-700 dollars. We don't send cash a check to actually buy the stuff and we ship it to the

classroom or if it's a field trip will pay the bus company in this is ADD significant operational complexity, but it's quarter what we do and we're going to keep doing it and similarly every project that goes live on our site doesn't just go up there like on a say a GoFundMe. We have a human being review every single project and the good news is it's done by people who are much more qualified than I am. We have a core of a couple hundred teachers. We've been successful on the website and successful in the classroom, and they're helping to publish live about a thousand classroom project

request every day just to give you a sense with a bow. So they're doing a killer job, but one of the challenges that we anticipate is that as we grow and grow or we get spikes and volume. We're not sure how well this scales so we can get our data science team and team might be overstating it because we have to data scientist. We connected or data science team at 2 with the good Folks at kaggle. And if you're not familiar with the Bible is Google's crowdsourced data science community. So folks with data chops, organized around data challenges and together with cago. We

launched this challenge to see if we could automate this wedding, right? So could we have machines and algorithms apply the same sort of rigor and feedback for the teacher submitting project that today is done by humans made it to offset some of that volume that we're seeing you. And the good news as those of you familiar with AI and machine learning is that the training data set that were able to give to the community was pretty big so we gave them a couple years worth of screening information a couple hundred thousand projects submitted to our site and either approved or rejected an

iterated and then approved in each project. Every single resource that they requested for their classroom. So books or technology for the field trip details, and if we got the meditate up around the school or around the classroom like the subject or the grade level where the poverty level should be rich data set and we ran this contest with cattle for 2 months. Just ended a few weeks ago 600 data scientist participated 6000 algorithms were submitted and it just ended we're still digging through the details and the

results but the good news is that we can already see that the top submissions way out performed anything. We were young. Do you want our own until this is pretty exciting. Right? This is an operational scary scaling problem that we had and the data science and machine Learning Community was able to step up and hopefully the results mean that we may be able to more effectively help even more classrooms. That's amazing. Maybe even some people in this audience were part of the teams that responded to that the shifting gears a little. Just, you know here in Silicon Valley were very comfortable

with risk, but in the world of feeling of the p in the world of nonprofits not so much right. So wanted to ask you about risk and maybe wrist that you've had to take either personally or professionally how that's played out how that goes in the culture. Would you like to start us? Sure. I'm from West Philadelphia born and raised in Bel Air going into police department and doing the work of figuring out how to clean their excruciating the ugly data, It wasn't too scary as a black person walking into a law enforcement space. It was scary as an academic.

You don't get any credit for doing something that shifts the needle on public policy when your job is to get tenure and create new knowledge, which is the job description for a faculty member is building the organization that's necessary the infrastructure that's necessary to keep all this stuff going what what you're saying up here is a bunch of folks who are coming social entrepreneurship requires that you build something kind of with your hands and hold it together until there's enough Revenue coming in that I can hold itself together. Don't have a

degree in that I've degree in many many other things but none in that so figuring it out and building the boat as we're going along and then now moving into a space where technology could solve so many of these problems can automate this and put this in the hands of the 18,000 police departments across the country each of whom have a home-brewed data management process right bat. I mean, it is part of what can I use to keep you up at night. I mean, it's amazing to think that you're you're having these police agencies come to you. So they want to work together. They're giving

their data voluntarily. I mean, you're right on The Cutting Edge of some of our biggest racial issues as a country and it's exciting to see both sides coming together to save let slip that data any evidence really drive a discussion here. It was shocking to me the first thing that anybody asks when they say they do this like us what you must do the police department know you must get it from the public they come to me. Blackenstein, would you please tell us how racist we are and believe it or not? That's what I get that kind of regularly with my other of codename and it's because they're

used to using data to hold themselves accountable to Crime the DNA of any Police Department. Is that right and cons. He was like they going they say what time the crime is occurring where it is on the map and they do this thing called putting cops on. Right on that helps to reduce the crime. The problem has been on racial disparities that disparities could be because of crime rates by could be because of poverty something that the police department's not really accountable for don't we Dallas reviews Census Data reviews on survey data from the officers on a survey data from the

residence with their behavioral needed that they do not share with anybody else. And we said this is how we give you become stats for justice in your department has amazing. All right, so Jess equally another topic right in the crosshairs of American society right now. Should be any more relevant or topical. I'm sure you have encountered some personal and professional in organizational risk. So personally I had to decide about 5 years ago about whether or not I wanted to talk publicly about my sexual assault and I think for people who

want to make change on Highway stigmatized areas and if you want a town to company in that area, it's really hard to do without talking about why you care about that issue and a lot of these issues are very hard to talk about and people aren't used to talk about them with their parents with the people. They're dating with their friends. And so I had to decide whether or not to kind of like out myself in order to work in this area. And even now I think what's an organizational challenge is that if there is a program officer at a foundation who gets what we're doing on a deep level because

they faced it that's very hard for them to come to their boss. And say no, I know this is a good idea. And here's why if somebody donates to us and now they want to get their friends on for to throw a fundraiser. They have to say why they care about this organization and again and are they having to out themselves to so I'm in stigmatize areas where we haven't quite gotten to the point where people are comfortable telling their own personal narratives related to the topic. It's really hard to find raids actually and it's a little bit challenging to get off the ground cuz well everybody

feels the problem at a high-level. It's hard to relate to it personally if we can't talk about it and share about it with each other. I think the second kind of big challenge for us is what we're doing is really risky. Like we're trying to create a safe place for victims of sexual assault and sexual harassment to share with us like the deepest secrets of their lives, and then we need to protect those like we need to protect those from lawyer. I need to protect those from hackers. We need to take a tremendous around amount of care with

the data that people are entrusting us with because what we're asking of people is to create an account and to save what happened to them timestamp now, why does his important is that on average college survivors take 11 months to make their report sexual assault by which time it's really hard for anyone to do an investigation. It's really hard for them to remember it clearly and it's really hard for Action to be taken. So if you can allow somebody the ability to process what happened to them closer to the event to write it down to document it in a way that they feel safe and that you're

not prompting them to write down things are not sure of cuz then I'll be used to Say that's comforting test conflicting testimony later. If they come on it's really important that your prompting them to do that correctly and that you're securing those data and if they want to use our system to figure out if there's other victims of the same perpetrator, then we're asking them to input in the name and a series of unique identifier is like cell phone number or Facebook URL about their perpetrator and an event of a match meaning somebody else naming the same Predator. We

connect them with a Callisto options counselor who like Huey provides her service to combine the stack of his attorney or under the supervision of an attorney who talks to each victim separately get the sense of their case gives him a sense of their options and if appropriate connects them together to decide what to do next including everything from confronting the perpetrator by their behavior to going to HR to going public going to the police to finding a lawyer excetera. This means though that we are not only again holding really sensitive data up. But if we're doing our

job, we're bringing down some very influential very powerful very well Network very rich people. We're building a system to bring down the wine stains of the world brink of the politicians of the world bring down the CEOs of companies. Like what we're trying to do is highly likely to be attacked from lots of different directions. And we need to take that charge very seriously. We need to make sure that we're not launching anything that we're not sure which means we have to build a slowly and carefully in a lot of ways or is he just want to go fast as the startup but you can't fail fast with

something like this. You cannot fail like this. He just opened this up to all of you. So you have this room here of self-selected folks who I think are passionately interested in this topic of technology for social impact once you to think back to you know, some aha moments and insights that you've had along your journey and think what do you know now that you wish you had known in the beginning of your journey and advice that you have for people who are interested in

applying technology for humanitarian impact. Anyone want to start us off there? My advice would be to leverage pure groups for advice and for continual learning example, AllShare is called tto's for good witches group that I co-founded some years back and it's the people who run engineering at what I consider some of the most tech-forward nonprofits on the planet. We got about 20 orgs participating now including Kalisto Akiba code for America Wikipedia

Khan Academy code.org charity water Global citizen crisis text line and others. It's an amazing group and we meet annually for we have like a two-day mini conference with a very active email list. And what we're doing is helping each other in like a safe space trusted space. We talked about technical challenges vendors to avoid hiring challenges all sorts of things and now there are similar pure groups in other disciplines like marketing and operations and also up and down the text that that text back so we Got devops for good and it for good and data science for good and

look the non-profit world has theirs challenges. We typically have fewer resources and Tighter budgets been our for-profit can Patriots in those sectors but one of our advantages is that we usually can share more openly and share more freely than other Industries which have to be more secretive. So that's my advice and advise that ability to share to your advantage. I thought I think two pieces of advice from me. The first is I do a lot of coaching of young social entrepreneur has and I often find that folks would have have created a solution

that is in search of a problem. Right? Like I have this great app. I have this great tool and I'm trying to figure out ways to apply it to a social problem and my advice would be to switch to the Paradigm. Right? Like what is the social challenge about which you are most passionate right about which you sort of wants to spend or for which you want to spend a lot of time and then think about what that solution would be and the reminder that technology is a tool right? It is not the solution. It is a tool and so really to refrain the sort of challenges and

Solutions in the pipeline. That's probably a little bit different right then then then we think about it when we are in rooms like this. The second piece is the importance of engaging your client and users as designers, right? I think Austin time in the communities that were operating in folks who live in the communities have a lot of ideas for the solutions, right? I mean what's missing is the opportunity to create organizations the way that we create them? So as you are thinking about Solutions and if you're thinking about, you know, she

would have liked one of the challenges really really important to get users as designers, right not as consultants not participating in focus groups after you've already come up with the solution, but can you engage folks in the design process so that you were creating write a solution that actually is applicable and relevant to the communities that that you wish to serve device. I got uncomfortable giving advice cuz I have to live with the life that I've chosen. So when I asked to give advice I usually give what my dad has told me if you want to be a philosopher do were

philosophers go from William James and also no one should want to be a philosopher. My dad was the one that's difficult at the dinner table early on, but they do ride-alongs with law enforcement and just as a side note. The Google immersion team is when we send our Engineers product managers ux designers volunteers from Google to work side-by-side. And before we got started writing code. The first thing they did was do the Ride Along they talked with folks. They went to training at NYPD for Smith. And before I ever

started doing this work when I just had my regular degree in psychological science. I went and spent a month in better than the Denver Police Department and the violence That I I thought I was going to experience was really different violence. It was more close up. It was more intimate. It didn't take the shape that I thought. It was the racism that I thought. I was going to see what she can I figured wood look like old school racism. It was really really different and so being where the people are will make me a decision. This is the users as designers right being in the ecosystem

where the problem is allows for the solution to become the thing that they always knew they needed but they couldn't because they were too close to it. If you don't get close enough to it, then you're not able to see any of it right quote on the problem and the solution. I think one of my big learnings was realizing that my job is not to build a tech product for a victim's. What is Building Company but outside of that even though larger offering of what we're providing. A tech product doesn't work if people

don't know about it people won't know about it. If you don't figure out how you're going to Market it to them chances are your customer is not the same as your user if you're building a lot of tech for good. And so if you get so focused on building the product for your end user you'll you'll lose a lot of a different Partnerships that you need. So I think it's good to map out the whole system. Like, who is it who needs to buy your product? What do they are care about in bed with them what they want to learn about it. What's the best way to get it to that like get a sense of their

space and get a sense of what they want when they get there, but I think I got so focused on kind of the end results, but I didn't understand the whole path of the whole system. So it sounds like you guys have everything in hand and everything's going really well, but maybe there's one or two things that keep you up at night. Maybe just something that if if this thing goes sideways it could be the undoing. I don't let anyone want to share about what's keeping you up at night. I mean, I'm paranoid about security for sure

and the certainty that we're going to get sued if that's what I'm worried that you're going to get sued when you just know it's going to happen. It's more just like, how are we going to dress as well? And he's like, how are we going to create attorney-client privilege electronically, like there's not a lot of precedent for that. How do we match on data that we can't see because we know it's going to get some peanuts. We need to make sure that we're matching as we're using winner secret sharing and Marie federating are servers and we're doing a lot of just barely complicated cutting-edge

technology. Where is normally if you're building tech4good, it's like You don't want to be building in that stuff. Unless you need it. Like often a Google form will do the trick a lot of a lot of issues. But in our case we do and so it is sort of setting new president and a lot of different areas which is a little scary and at the moment word hiring a lot of people so finding the right people for the team at a really critical stage and growth including senior leadership is always like a little scary cuz the future of your company is your people

find a way to make jokes about is that people will get bored with the suffering of the communities that we deal with, you know, in 2014 when Ferguson caught on fire and Baltimore shortly thereafter, we have been doing this work for you know, almost 10 years prior to that and nobody cared and what I've seen since then is both heartening and depressing. For the past year, we estimated that fell Tropic give a nationally to Criminal Justice Reform across the United

States. What about 220 million dollars that's way more than it used to be. But of that budget about 10 million is for re-entry and reintegration 200 million is 4 decarceration + 10 million is 4 police say that that's scary for me. Not just because the resources are so small to get this work done because I mean what we do everyday is we go between the communities where there are kids who refer to themselves as the throwaway people should the department that hear that and don't know how to do better. And so what we find ourselves doing in the times that are not the

good time is begging people to care enough that the relationships between the Departments that care and the people that need them can be strengthened the way of that that they should be Well in our last few minutes here and I'll and I'll say for those who are interested in having a deeper conversation making a personal connection with our heroes here in the organizations. They represent after this talk. We're going to be out in the grassy area by the totem pole just up a little bit from there on the platform. We've got that area reserved

for conversation. If folks want to come in and have some one-on-one Q&A, but in general, you know, you've got this self-selected group this room full of technology has two are obviously very curious about this want to get involved. So what's your call-to-action? How can folks how can these folks get involved in help help carry the load? We're hiring Engineers are go to heaven Source itself on GitHub. Check it out contribute and if you think that your employer or school or conference or whoever should I adopt Kalisto so that all of their members can

get to access suggest them online at project Kalisto. Org. So our first collaboration with kaggle to automate the screen in a classroom projects that I told you about it so successful that we're doing another article challenge. The focus is around re-engaging donors to return to the site and support more classrooms. So, for example, we have 40 50 60 thousand classroom project request live on the site at any one time. Could we recommend just a couple that would resonate with a specific donor that would make them more likely to open their wallet and you do

fundraising re-engaging donors are critically important to any or get those fundraising but this for us isn't and especially hairy challenge because many of our donors only give once or twice so we don't have a lot of signal there to work with. So if you got data chops, and you're curious, please go check out pagal.com / donors choose flash Ayo, and you can learn more there. There it is also, For those of you that have kids or teachers in the family. You may know that this week is National Teachers Appreciation Week. That's all week. Google

is generously doubling donations too many projects and the way it works the each day the donations. The match is focused on different project categories that are super important to teachers. So today the focus is music. The idea is let's support those students who want to learn music the teachers were helping him develop their talent so you can go to donorschoose.org Google Music pick a class from to support Google will double your donation to thank you Google for that generosity and thank you to all the teachers out there who are doing the hard work to bring the best out of our

kids. All right. Thanks. Awesome. Okay. I have a couple of things. The first one is really simple and really easy. We are increasing our social media presence. So if you could just go and follow at Beyond 12 if you're coming up anywhere, okay, it's coming up somewhere, but it's at and it's a v e y o n d 1 2 at Beyond 12, you know to eat lots of interesting things. There is a text talk that we just did that we would love to amplify. So if you watched any feel inspired, please feel free to amplify and just follow

us is worse. What if by camping up our social media efforts the second one as we too are hiring Engineers, so we had been Outsourcing our development. We just hired us a CTO and we're looking for engineering help in whatever form it comes in. So definitely three. Us and let us know if you're interested particularly looking for folks we have ml experience. And then the third one is much more personal right? So we work with students are graduating from college who are also thinking about their first two jobs who have not had the opportunities that a lot of us were sitting on the stage

of had. So when you think about your own personal career and As You Are Climbing your own ladders of I just want to ask you to take a step back to think about who are you pulling along with you? Right who may have different experiences that you have? So when you think about who you're mentoring, you know, add Google when you think about who you're hiring at Google and when you think about your own personal philosophy, how can you sort of his bed the principles that you've heard from all of us in your own personal and professional Journey so that you can increase opportunity and ensure

right that a child zip code no longer determines his or her Destiny. So three things first. Please do follow us on social media. I'm at dr. Phil Goff. That's the other doctor Phil nerd. I brought the T-shirt. So we just had our first group of young justice nurse. You can hash tag amplify the messages that way. Apparently it's going around. We are in the process of Hiring a CTO group of volunteer software Engineers. So if you're interested you can get in touch with

social media. Org and the third one. This is a way to get involved were generally when we're talking about police accountability in every city that you live in in the United States. You can call your Police Department not to report something but to request a ride along that ride along is just getting the car. It's been a couple hours going to see what law enforcement does and I cannot I have never had it happen. If someone goes through a ride along and has that experience and doesn't want to do something to reward folks to make it just to make that space a different were vital safer

and more fair space 223 our commitment a phone call a little bit of awkwardness. You don't have to wear the vest if you don't want to but I highly encourage folks to it. There's almost nothing by opening in terms of how you relate to Public Safety for the ability to go and take one of those so I encourage everybody. So that's a no specific call to action. I think I've ever heard. All right in our last just couple minutes here. Why don't we end a moment of inspiration and help if you guys want to share just one thing that gives you hope I'll start gives me

hope that this session sold out and they had to put us in the largest room available because all of you are so interested in this topic and you all bring a skill set that is desperately needed and that gives me hope When Ferguson blew up and we saw Baltimore get ugly, And the rest of the country was consumed with the issues of police violence for several years the head of the FBI, commented that he was embarrassed because we had no idea how many people got shot by law enforcement every year the federal

government didn't have any idea by the time that we next elect President in 2020, We will have enough data to give a national Snapshot not just of disparities in Police use of deadly force or just disparities in police use-of-force put on racial bias on all police Behavior. That's because of technologist like all of you because of Behavioral scientist like me and my Justice nerd friends and because of what law enforcement in communities are requiring it and that to me is one of the best good news stories on Transamerica.

Do I have the incredible of honor of working with amazing young people college students high school students are high school students were about to transition to college and what gives me hope is what I have seen in this generation right from the students in Parkland to Oakland to Chicago to Dorchester who are fighting for their right to be safe and who are demanding right that we adults stop and pay attention and I am incredibly inspired by the spirit of intersectionality that these young people are operating with and operating with the creepy but none of

us is free until all of us are free. And for me that gives me hope you know, whatever sort of I read. I'm on Twitter. I'll read a Facebook post and I'll read you know, the latest incident that is happening. I remember those young people right? I think back to the way that they have touched and moved and started a movement and I'm inspired and think that Going to be okay. We're going to be good. All right. Yet whether it's a response to our title challenge with the participation and ciccio's for good or like Jacqueline said all of you being here that

makes me hopeful and grateful because I see that Community rising to the occasion and wanting to give back wanted to make a social impact, but it's full time on a voluntary basis and I think with your superpowers we can we can really change things. And that's why don't you wrap us up. I'm going to try and do too. So the first is that about a month ago. I was in New York and I was visiting the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater, which is a comedy troupe and training school for young Comedians and I was talking to some of the actors

there and one of them said to me she was like there are always people who we kind of knew about. It was for an Open Secret, but nothing really happened and within two months after Callisto had launched those people were recorded and they weren't here anymore. Well sort of her to have that sense that like that had happened and that quickly and her community gave me a lot of Hope and the second is that back in June and July when Justin caldbeck it first happened and where and all of these your friends on venture capitalist for getting outed.

I started looking into that. Face and I had based on those news articles in a very negative impression Adventure capitalist and then recently over the last three months. I've been talking to a lot of time because we've actually been fundraising from them and I've been going into firms and saying hey does your VC firm want to donate? There's no Financial Roi and BC from don't normally do this, right? This is not their thing. Would you like to donate to allow us to create a reporting system to help Founders report sexual misconduct committed by venture capitalist.

No idea if that would work seems like they have every intention but about one and three forms have said yes, and now we have seven including Greylock first-round. A lot of great friends who are donating to support this work and actually want accountability and their industry, and so I think there are a lot of people who do care about this issue and just and you can't just assume like because most of your man or whatever you're not in this some of our best allies have been then some of our best allies are the ones that you'd expect the least, and I

think that this is a problem. That's so many people care about and if you just give them an opportunity to be a part of it, they will be well, thank you for everything that you guys are doing to give all of us so much hope so. Let's hear it for these Heroes. Thank you.

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