Test Leadership Congress
June 28, 2019, New York, USA
Test Leadership Congress
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Lina Zubyte - Finding Power in Authenticity
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  • Description
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About speaker

Lina Zubyte
QA Consultant at ThoughtWorks

Lina Zubyte is a passionate Quality Enthusiast who loves to ask questions, test, collaborate with diverse departments and investigate issues. Lina has worked in companies of different sizes (large multi-national companies and a startup), moved countries for work and had to adapt quickly to getting out of comfort zone. Favorite parts of being a quality professional for Lina are: diving deep to complex issues which may even reveal design or algorithm flaws, using monitoring tools and analytics data to understand the impact of found issues and collaborating with the team to build a high quality product. In her free time, Lina loves traveling and discussions with inspiring people.

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About the talk

I was terrified. I did not feel that I was good enough. I started thinking that tech may not be for me. I just joined a very high-performing team having modern agile practices as a first-ever QA. The team did not know what exactly to expect from me, and I did not know myself how I can help, so I had to learn to embrace others and most importantly myself.

Having worked in a startup as the first QA it had and then shifting to consulting where I also was the only QA in the role, I had some challenges: there was noone to tell me what a QA is supposed to be within that context. At the start I even did tasks which were not really my expertise, like, working on the infrastructure code. This was a good learning experience, but I did not feel like I was contributing.

Finding the power in just being yourself can be a daunting task, but it’s extremely rewarding. I managed to climb over myself and find ways how to contribute to the team just embracing myself and not trying to be somebody else. In this session, I will share my story of how I did that, and, hopefully, inspire you to find power in your own authenticity.

00:03 What kind of journey I had?

01:19 What is authenticity?

02:09 Growth comes from "Why on Earth did I get myself here?"

02:35 How did my career develop?

03:23 Discovering new spaces

06:00 Shift to a quality analyst

09:25 Build the right product

11:05 Initial project setup

13:16 It's overwhelming trying to be someone else

13:54 Expanding horizons

14:55 Dark times

15:55 Talking to others

16:52 You are here to help the team

17:27 Who am I?

18:11 What differentiates me that others value?

19:00 Driving quality conversation, helping align the teams.

20:46 Attention to detail and product focus

22:39 You can be team glue

25:44 Make your work fun! Embrace your talents/interests

26:35 Change is scary

27:09 How to increase the power of authenticity?

28:58 Learn by experimenting

29:59 Enable the team to build high-quality products

30:51 Manifesto of Agile Software development

31:45 Grow together

32:43 Finding power in authenticity

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Thank you. 00:03 Everyone so, first of all, why would they talk about something that's sounds like some kind of self-help book while we first of all need that and I 00:03 was always quite a quirky a bit strange personality. 00:18 When I started quality analysis could hear I love what I do and I was pretty authentic all the time. 00:22

However, around a year ago, 00:31 I feel some kind of authenticity problem, 00:32 so I forgot who I was and I had to regain power in my situation and what I was doing. 00:35 I need that she gets some kind of reset. 00:43 And today when I look back at this, 00:47 I managed to recover from that, 00:49 and regain my power. 00:51 However, 00:51 not much change when it comes to external factors So what changed the most was my mindset so today. 00:53 I'd like to share my story with you? 00:59

What journey I had what kind of change. 01:02 I had as well as what kind of issues, 01:05 there where and what kind of learnings, 01:08 I have. 01:10 So to begin with. 01:10 What does authenticity? 01:15 So authenticity is a collection of choices that we have to make every day. 01:15 It's about the choice to show up on video. 01:22 It choice to be honest, 01:25 they chose to let our true selves BC. 01:27

Spell Bren Brown, a Bren Brown has a lot of great books and resources for example, 01:30 empathy versus sympathy and. 01:38 Then she once gave a talk at a conference the other day, 01:38 she felt extremely vulnerable. 01:45 I think it fell. 01:45 It like lasted for maybe a week. 01:48 Even and I feel that is authentic. 01:50 The choice should be real to just show up and be honest. 01:53 That's scary that's really scary and that actually opens up for vulnerabilities. 01:57

And well when it comes to my journey. 02:03 I very often ask myself why on Earth did I get myself here. 02:05 Nobody else made me do this. 02:10 I did it to myself, 02:12 and this is what I did with my career, 02:13 but I had very steep leaps and their career choices, 02:16 I made? 02:19 And I love challenges, 02:19 but I feel that all these challenges make me grow and learn more and more about myself. 02:22 Others as well as my career. 02:29 So I started in the very usual setting. 02:34

So I was a siloed QA or better to say a manual tester. 02:38 AB testing after developing right so development is done and then did you Mann of testing? 02:44 And away from this big multinational company and I gain great testing fundamentals. 02:51 I'm still grateful for that I learned about exploratory testing about the best plants and so on. 02:57 However, I loved collaborating with others. 03:02 and I couldn't because testers were more like a tribe there. 03:05

They were all together and not wanting to work with developers for example, 03:09 and I felt you know, 03:13 I'm ready for a new challenge because they love challenges. 03:15 So. 03:19 I'm originally Lithuanian Lithuanian is a tiny country close to the Baltic Sea in Europe, 03:19 Northern Slash Eastern and then I was living there and then after being in Sweden for a year for study exchange. 03:26 I was like well. 03:34

I'd love to move and explore the world because it's full of adventure and then almost by accident. 03:34 I found a job ad, 03:43 which was in a country I have never even visited before. 03:45 And but it sounded great, 03:50 so I was like why. 03:52 Not so eventually after actually interview process. 03:54 I ended up moving to Hungary. 03:57 Country that speaks a completely different language different culture and moved to Budapest. 04:00

Not knowing anyone there or even visiting the country before and I landed. 04:04 It was already for the job in the first person I met in Hungary was my boss. 04:08 An I join there. 04:15 Best fashion startup how exciting right so it's a new domain canvas first-ever quality annalistic ever had. 04:15 So as a result, I have lots of work to do, 04:26 and learn and grow myself and there were no walls because I was the only way there. 04:29

So what I did was I have quite a great journey and I learn automation finally. 04:36 And I used it for selenium, 04:42 Jenkins and Java was an interesting one for me because I never coded a lot before and so as a result? 04:44 When I created my first project. 04:53 I was so excited. 04:55

Yes, 04:55 working I'm asserting these things I have automated checks and there was no one else to review my code except for their senior Java developer who had 10 years of 04:57 experience I was like alright let's. 05:10 I like it works, I mean, 05:12 I'm happy and I got around 50 comments for my first pull request because it all was wrong. 05:14 All the conventions were wrong code was not clean at all, 05:20 and 1st of us. 05:24 Rather, 05:24 frustrated with that. 05:26

However, with time realized I learn so much from this of course. 05:26 I felt like a noob and I felt like a Kindergarten Kid Grinch. 05:31 I don't know a University. 05:36 However, it was a big growth opportunity and I managed to somehow I overcome this. 05:37 And this time was started collaborating with many more roles in the company from developers. 05:43

Of course to salespeople or even CEO and what I did a lot was that I found a big passion, 05:49 which is monitoring the data of a number and I started looking at production. 05:58 Data and The thing is that we work with fashion retailers. 06:04 So we had lots of very interesting data to analyze and I could finally actually lift myself from just tested ecosexual quality analyst because I was looking at impact. 06:08 Let's say of issues have found what matters. 06:21

I was invited to quality and to give quality insights. 06:24 Anna weekly priority meetings with the CEO and head of engineering and I loved what I did. 06:29 As it was so fascinating sometimes to take a look that OK in some cities, 06:35 something doesn't work, so there was lots of observability and learning. 06:41 And I started this shift report analyst I would say that it became not just testing. 06:46

It's very, very more. and I work with so many more people and I started learning a lot going to conferences as well as. 06:52 There are modern testing principles by Alan Page and it sounds amazing that we improve quality as a team and that new modern testers are doing more coaching rather 07:01 than maybe testing and we went. 07:12 I went to a conference to speak to. 07:14

Ireland hoops and I shifted my journey very fast now, 07:17 so I went to stick in a conference in Ireland. 07:22 I got the Turbo called an I was just sitting in the corner a munching on honey. 07:28 and I organized the lady likely was thinking. 07:34 Oh, this poor girl. 07:37 She has talked the next day and she's just alone in the corner and she introduced me to someone from thought works. 07:37

And it was like you know of course, 07:47 I've heard the name and we started talking about way. 07:49 In what does it mean that so many times it's about solving people's problems. 07:52 It's not just testing it's so much more. 07:57 It's making people talk to each other because they don't manage to do that. 07:59 And then I was like OK and they are working actually in this modern QA ways. 08:04 So I was like wow. 08:11

That sounds great, so you know as I am as crazy as I am I just decided to move to Germany on my own yet again. 08:13 I never lived there before I didn't even like it as much. 08:21 But I was like well work sounds interesting. 08:25 So I moved there for work and an interesting thing is OK. 08:28 So I shift to this more modern quality analyst but they also shipped you insulting which is a new thing for me and I like this quote by Jerry 08:32 Weinberg, saying that. 08:42

The better adapted you are the less adaptable it is entropy. 08:42 And I think this is what consulting, in the end, is we're working in a big company and a bigger small but we are working there for a long time, 08:48 we get integrated with each of our comfort zones as a result, 08:58 we are adapted but change is way more difficult for us. 09:02 As a consultant you shift projects. 09:06

So then change is inevitable changes of part of your hair year, 09:08 which can be very hard mentally actually because you may not feel integrated sometimes and you're always made to be adaptable. 09:13 So how does a software issue QA so when the previous talk without? 09:23 How should it be done well there are some things we are trying to do this so in software works. 09:27 Acura stars as early as possible. 09:34 Even maybe from design marks. 09:36 It would be from prototypes. 09:38

An we, first of all, a pair up with business analysts and we read stories together and we tried to build the right product. 09:40 We question this will work as well, 09:48 baby user experience designers not only business designers. 09:50 And then we tried to have a shorter cycle time so we do not have a separate QA how long video. 09:53

What we do is that we tried to build a trial by pairing with developers having certain practices like TDD helping them to think of test cases and this 10:01 is we shorter than the usual cycle. 10:12 But it's very challenging. 10:15 One and then of course, 10:15 there's feedback cycles, So what happens later on. 10:18 And when you think about this, 10:22 or not OK, So what does look away does acquirement analysis. 10:24

Q 8's development So what you do so there is this graph and stuff works, 10:28 which was not created by a QA just for their of the information because it looks like you is the center of the universe and it is sort of 10:33 like that, and I think that's why I like you from the star because I like talking to different professionals. 10:44 I like getting to know how they do things. 10:51 And, of course, testing is the main expertise that we have. 10:55

However, we have to know a lot from other domains another over. 10:59 So I get the sense of your first project. 11:05 I'm excited I get your work as this modern QA buy just one thing happens that insult works. 11:08 We go alone and you are going as a solar role to a cross-functional team to work as a way you expected should be this modern QA yay. 11:15 I'm excited. 11:25

I learn on this and then I'm like OK, 11:25 so How do I help development I'm like you can see DD something there like there's nothing to DVD? 11:29 There's just infrastructure code at the moment. 11:36 I never worked with at this point, 11:39 and then it's a super high performing team, 11:43 meaning that the other developers that we fear of the uh developers who could win the battle and say why. 11:47

They're testing everything and they have it there so they're very confident very vocal people and who had a testing strategy in place and it looked beautiful. 11:56 OK, well, what should I do then I'm older I user stories right so requirements. 12:09 And they were written by another consultant at the different team, 12:16 which is not a part of our team, 12:19 so that would be like well. 12:21

I'm not going to go and sell them how to do their work right so I am in this dilemma. 12:23 And I've never worked in this context, 12:29 and I'm excited to learn more things. 12:30 So. 12:33 But I feel so different. 12:33

I was the one QA and then there were 6 developers so you should developers ion pairs and me was alone and I was expected to be this modern QA 12:38 who can help her from the very, 12:47 very start and it is very started his infrastructure state and I'm looking at the team. 12:49 They're looking at me or like we're not sure what to do here, 12:54 but let's try to make it. 12:59 Of course, and we started even picking OK. 13:00

We can pair so I can pair with a developer and we can work on infrastructure together. 13:03 And that's great and I learned a lot and I was extremely happy, 13:09 however, it's overwhelming friendship with someone else because when pairing I would compare myself with a developer who's an infrastructure expert and I'd be like, 13:15 I'm a silent prayer. 13:25

I'm not saying much I can help sometimes to try to figure out something or point out a little thing, 13:25 but I did not feel like I'm contributing so all these previous jobs. 13:34 An I'm not doing something that I already did before. 13:39 And I feel like I'm just there and maybe I'm not doing enough. 13:43 And. 13:48

I started reading a lot and I start expanding horizons in the sense that I would try to understand all the testing concepts that for example, 13:48 in automation and health with S Pyramid, 13:58 like contract test. 14:01 So I could help the developers right. 14:01 So when they're doing that I would have the ability because if I don't know. 14:04

Of course, I cannot do that. 14:08 and I started reading some of the very great books, 14:10 which helped a lot, but they are also at a high level, 14:13 So what we learned most is from practical real-life experiences. 14:17 And then I was like wow. 14:20 I do not know what you do in this situation so I asked for advice and advise that God was the bull. 14:22 And I hated it, I was like I just moved to a new country. 14:29 I don't know anyone here. 14:34

I am supposed to be this mother in some kind of quality analyst and a person tells me to be bold. 14:36 I don't feel bold at all. 14:44 I feel fragile. 14:46 I feel like I don't know what you do in this situation and. 14:46 And then some kind of dark times hit me. 14:52 I will go to work and I would survive my Dayan. 14:57 I would learn and try to be strong and then I would go back home and sometimes I would see people going to the supermarket and I'd be like wow. 15:00

You're thinking what you get for dinner and I'm thinking? 15:09 What did I do with my life. 15:12 Why did they move? 15:14 Why did I, in general, took this job and maybe tech is not for me because I'm not good enough. 15:14 Maybe hiring did the mistake, 15:23 you hire me, maybe I'm just across. 15:25 And it was a very, 15:29 hard period in my life and it's the whole other topic. 15:30

What happens when there's burnout and how do you come out of that and it took a lot of time to recover but I realize that a little bit. 15:35 Maybe forgot who I was and. 15:45 One thing that, however, cheesy it is that help was talking to others, 15:48 and again, I've moved so much so. 15:54 It's hard, but The thing is that in a group usually, people do not say that they are facing the same. 15:59 And you don't want to open up in the group either. 16:05

It's scary, however, if you talk to someone. 16:09 One very often people are facing similar issues with you and they also feel that maybe they're not good enough and you can relate and get actual advice. 16:12 And getting this feedback understanding what the team wants from you. 16:20 I started talking 1. 16:24 On one with other team members and saying. 16:24 Hey, you know what you expect from my role. 16:28 What is quality to you and they started saying? 16:31

I do not think that you should be an infrastructure expert. 16:34 And it's causing it down a little bit, 16:39 it's step-by-step. 16:43 Lots of conversations. 16:43 Lots of opening up which is very hard and vulnerable and then once I met another quick. 16:45

Which is a rather rare occasion in every consultancy and they told me selfishness you got this there is a reason why you're here that you are with a certain 16:53 authentic skill set for a reason you are here to help the team. 17:03 And, yes, you are. 17:07 The friend and you stand out from this team, 17:07 a lot, but you are there because they want you to be there. 17:11 And as simple as it sounds it helped me a lot. 17:15

That yes, I'm there being myself being my authentic me, 17:20 but then the question is why am I. 17:24 I forgot who I was at that point and this is an allegorical painting for know thyself phrase and that's what I just stop for a minute and 17:27 I was like, Alright, so I had to recharge. 17:39 Every game my power, So what are my strengths? 17:43 I do know some things right? 17:46 I'm not like I don't know anything? 17:49

I had to remind myself that there are things that I know and there are things that I don't and that's OK and I have to learn somehow to roll 17:52 myself and maybe improve. 18:01 And I started thinking OK, 18:01 So what differentiates me that others may value in the team. 18:05 And, yes, I am different and it's hard for me to compare myself with someone else. 18:09 And I started first thing for regaining power. 18:16

I just created this wall of post IDs writing out what I think are the pain points and bottlenecks at the theme are facing. 18:19 My desk is a mess because it's full of post IDs an all kinds of ideas on how I could help and actually. 18:28 I realize that even in that infrastructure set up it was not that perfect. 18:35 Many things could be improved. 18:39 But I had somehow to just stop believing everyone and be like OK. 18:41

Maybe there are things that I could help to improve not just think, 18:45 yeah, they're doing a great job and you just go on. 18:49 And the first thing of course, 18:56 that we talk about is this quality advocating so even if it is a high performing developer steam. 18:58 We are the ones who can drive a lot of quality conversations. 19:03

They may think about testing a lot of times I worked with developers who think about testing a lot and they mention it and they're like yes. 19:07 We should include performance testing, 19:16 but still having a person to try to advocate quality. 19:18 A lot helps a lot and this is as well that alignment between the teams or even team members. 19:21 Someone may say unit test another one can say integration tests. 19:27 They clash and they think that is the same thing. 19:30

So you as an as quote analysts can help in these situations and this is a shift. 19:34 So it's a shift from just getting a task to test to something that OK. 19:39 We have to promote this quality mindset. 19:44 And finally my business card. 19:46 I just realized on in the workshop that my business card for QA questions, 19:49 Asker. 19:55 And I feel that it is one of the biggest superpowers that we may have and as in the previous talk. 19:55

We have to ask questions and from the very start and a lot of times. 20:03 I have drawn out, diagrams of the architecture design and I will be like OK, 20:08 so explain to me, so how should we test. 20:14 This part or however, covering that and the requirements as well. 20:17 What about the negative cases. 20:20 What if this doesn't go right, 20:22 and these questions are extremely valuable for the team. 20:24

And another thing, of course, the testing expertise we can do is bug bashes or just process improvements how is something being done and run within the theme just visualizing 20:28 how we're working can help a lot. 20:39 And they just realized that I have this power allowed me OK. 20:43 I'm a bit more powerful. 20:47 I am useful sometimes and then I realize that OK? 20:49 What else differentiates mean I have extreme attention to detail sometimes too much. 20:52

An I realize a lot of you as well because in some talks are like Oh, 20:56 there's a typo there. 21:01 That's what I have as well as a professional illness and when I go shopping. 21:01 I also cannot buy not a perfect item. 21:08 I look at the item for like 10 minutes and I try to. 21:10 Find a better one this attention to detail actually what I found can be very useful even infrastructure developing because in infrastructure developing very often. 21:14 I don't know. 21:23

Maybe the developers. 21:23 I've worked with but they can be very clumsy and they make typos and then they had to re-run the comments many times and a lot of them really 21:25 appreciate if you're like. 21:36 Hey, 21:36 there's a type of before we run. 21:37 Maybe you could fix this then. 21:40 Yeah, you're right exactly there is a typo. 21:42 Or just asking a question? 21:44

How did we do this and some of the people are extremely happy to explain this and they realize certain problems that they left and you learn a lot and 21:46 they were in a lot in this can be very beneficial pairing another thing is a product focus. 21:56 Of course, working as a QA I had a lot of business domain knowledge and a product whose and even in the situation in the first project. 22:02 I realized that yes stories were a big pain point. 22:11

And, yes, they've everything written by another team, 22:14 but how could I help so we started having meetings talking about their code acquirements and how we can improve them and it helps the team enormously. 22:17 And I am a peoples person and when I first joined I was rather shy and I didn't want to speak up. 22:29 But I am. 22:36 The person in my previous company. 22:36

When I said that I left the one developer almost fell and he was like Oh no, 22:39 we will go bankrupt because I think I ended up being a team. 22:44 Blue, which is rather invisible work. 22:47 But it holds the theme and people come to you and they can talk to you and the empathy for me is one of the main things that I think 22:49 we should all have more empathy for each other. 22:58

And I realized that even increasing the team would is something that I love doing and it helps. 23:01 It helps the quality of work. 23:07 If I do that and they helping within ceremonies so finally actually once we had a retrospective in one developer said. 23:09 You know what I like this string that Linda was singing randomly and one day. 23:17 A lot of song references came to my head and I started humming and they loved it, 23:23 they were like wow. 23:30

And when it comes to team ceremonies is also a shift right so the team approach as so we created historical populist. 23:30 So we have certain as ceremonies planned with our team, 23:40 and surgical places when we have a story ready for development and we want you to align all of us. 23:44 And usually it's a QA developer as well as some people from the product side and they go through this list and we ask questions as many as we want. 23:51

And #4 is how will it be tested and we discuss OK? 24:00 What levels will we take, 24:04 will we include the Huey insurance as well? 24:05 Which your exploratory testing. 24:08 I how will we show. 24:08 This feature that is working and this helped the team, 24:11 so much a lot of people came after this list was implemented and they're like wow. 24:14 Linda thank you for introducing this. 24:19 It helps us and they use it. 24:21

It even if I am not present in the Sprint for example, 24:23 they can still keep on stories on the line. 24:27 Oh. 24:32 Sorry. 24:32 Ann. 24:32 So another love that I have so I said it a lot monitoring. 24:32 I love logging. 24:39 I love alerts and working in a very high performing team. 24:39 Sometimes I think Oh everyone knows it now. 24:43 Everyone knows it. 24:45 So then what can I contribute with it. 24:45 Everyone is so good at it? 24:49

And once we have the production issue and we were debugging it and trying to understand the root cause of that and I was pairing with a very experienced developer 24:51 who was affected in our team, 25:01 and I was like Oh yeah. 25:03 This is very interesting. 25:05 We're getting to the root cause and we're collecting. 25:05 This data from the logs and my prayer was the extreme opposite feels like. 25:09 I'm so frustrated. 25:14 I hate looking at logs. 25:14

I don't like it at all, 25:17 and I realized that you know all of us to have certain passions. 25:19 An my pressure from monitoring logs and alerts not necessarily as everyone else is a passion as well. 25:23 And now I help the team with that because a lot of people see it as a tedious task that they didn't want to do and they even get 25:28 stressed looking at that. 25:38 And, 25:38 of course, we have to make our work fun and embrace talents and interests. 25:43

Especially I think it's very useful in testing. 25:48 If we need to use some kind of data, 25:51 it can have found very interesting bugs, 25:54 so for me, I found some very interesting viruses. 25:57 Let's say learning Swedish and I would use certain words and then they would result in different results than ABC, 26:00 or random X one of the developers in my team loves emojis. 26:07 And he put it everywhere so he puts it in unit tests. 26:12 He puts it in input fields. 26:17

Ann and I know that it will be tested. 26:19 I know that encoding issues will be found this because this developer includes emojis and we will support this. 26:23 So. 26:32 And they look back so these little things. 26:32 Help me to find my value in this different context and change is extremely scary, 26:37 especially leaping through this. 26:43 Modern QA in helping high performing team which may happen, 26:43 but I think what's scarier Here is vulnerability that comes with that. 26:49

That comes with I am mean I am this and I have to be more proactive and I have to be more critical and it's different from work. 26:54 I do so. 27:05 It is quite scary, 27:05 but how do we increase this power? 27:08 How can we do this to feel more powerful in just being authentic? 27:12 So one of the quotes that I like someone told me from work was you had to get a week to get strong. 27:19 An I feel that this is a lot about all the insecurities. 27:27 We have so we have 2 ways. 27:31

We can either just put it all under the carpet and forget OK. 27:33 I cannot do this. 27:38 So then I just forget about it and I move on. 27:38 And I'm moving on with what I have or you can get it out and work on it, 27:43 which is something that can make you a stronger an example. 27:48 I like to give is the singer pink as she does air gymnastics in her performances and once there was an interviewer who asked. 27:52

You know unsure afraid of Heights and you do this amazing work and she said. 28:00 Oh, I'm terrified of Heights that is why I do it. 28:05 and she does it just to overcome the fear and she lived with. 28:08 She was like I could not live with such a big fear that I had so I had somehow to work on it. 28:14 And does not mean that the fear went away and she says she still scared that less scared. 28:23

And I think very often about authenticity that some people say, 28:30 Oh, it's just being who you are. 28:34 No not really. 28:37 It's actually about yes, 28:37 finding power in your strength, 28:40 but most importantly, working on improvement humans for you working on improving your weaknesses that are authentic. 28:42 That is feeling more powerful and embracing yourself and the way you live in general work. 28:49 And how do you do that good experiment? 28:57

It's scary, it's also changed, 29:01 but as in one of the talks. 29:02 I heard you have to try sometimes instead of changing a so held back in high growth mindset book, 29:05 said that he tries something it doesn't work and maybe people, 29:11 even criticize you in a fixed mindset. 29:15 You say I tried this. 29:18 It's over in a growth mindset. 29:19 You look forward to blurring alright so we tried. 29:21 it did not work and that's fine and we move on and what happens with themes as well. 29:24

Because maybe certain thing may not work for the theme, 29:31 especially if it's high performing team. 29:34 It's not that you will have always accurate column or if you call a more testing column you may need to change ways of working. 29:36

So I think that modern quality leaders go and I said quality leaders because I feel we all have to transition to quality leaders to enable the team to 29:45 build a high-quality product and this may mean that we are changing the ways we work, 29:56 a lot. 30:01 It can be a lot of change. 30:01 It's laughable near ability. 30:05 It's a lot of. 30:05 Fear and scary things. 30:08 So I like this graphic talking bout leaders versus bosses. 30:08

Saying that a leader doesn't care what caused the mess. 30:18 They jump right in to help clean it up while a boss doesn't help blames everyone else for the mess and dresses up like Napoleon. 30:22 But I feel like as modern quality leaders. 30:31 We have to help enable the team and help them how to fix it. 30:33 It instead of building silos and say, 30:38 Hey, I don't know so I don't ask me no OK OK. 30:40 I will try to help you with whatever I have and let's learn together. 30:44

And all this experience, I have, 30:50 I knew Agile Manifesto but I think I didn't get it. 30:52 So I had to have some pain to understand the Agile Manifesto. 30:57 Better, especially these 2 points. 31:03 Individuals and interactions over processes and foods and responding to change over following a plan. 31:05 That's exactly what I feel our role is moving forwards that it may not be all these processes and tools. 31:12

We may need to work in different ways to have the theme to think about what this quality for everyone. 31:18 If we work together as well as there may be no plans unless they are worked with this tool an hour will work with it for the rest of my 31:24 life. 31:33 No, we may need to respond to change. 31:33 And when it comes to authenticity. 31:39

I feel like one very important thing is supporting everyone else as well because there is power in the diversity of authenticity. 31:41 we need it. 31:50 We talked about tester teams that we need to understand humans as well, 31:50 and we may not represent or humanity. 31:57 Of course, so having a very diverse. 32:00 I teams help us to be better in the work with you and my team. 32:02 We are 7 people a cross-functional team, 32:09 and we're all different nationalities. 32:12

They come with our luggage from of culture of a lot of misunderstandings that we have between each other. 32:14 Even and we learn a lot and we grow together with this. 32:21 And I thought all right, 32:27 so this is the talk about empathy and this is my journey, 32:29 but How do I end most authentically and? 32:34 I wrote a poem because that's what I said. 32:39 And there may be times when you say it yourself. 32:44 I'm not good enough? 32:48

Why did you even try it may continue day after day even in the middle of the night wondering? 32:48 How everyone has their careers blank so fine. 32:57 But everyone is not shooting. 33:01 And that's OK, you fear to be different, 33:03 but knowing themselves is the only way to learn to improve and even help each other grow you train the growth mindset and reached the floor. 33:07 And here you if something is hard to do. 33:17 Do it more often. 33:21

And remember, 33:21 you are good enough and you can even get better. 33:23 If you accept yourself and others for who you embrace you are inner strange and keep an open heart. 33:27 Thank you. 33:35

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September 28, 2018
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