Duration 40:18
16+
Play
Video

Securing a Sustainable Future for the Amazon | DAVOS 2020

Jane Goodall
Founder at Jane Goodall Institute
+ 4 speakers
  • Video
  • Table of contents
  • Video
World Economic Forum 2020
January 22, 2020, Davos, Switzerland
World Economic Forum 2020
Video
Securing a Sustainable Future for the Amazon | DAVOS 2020
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Add to favorites
4.55 K
I like 0
I dislike 0
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
  • Description
  • Transcript
  • Discussion

About speakers

Jane Goodall
Founder at Jane Goodall Institute
Mishal Husain
Presenter at BBC News
Al Gore
Chairman and Co-Founder at Generation Investment Management LLP
Carlos Afonso Nobre
Senior Researcher, Institute of Advanced Studies at University of São Paulo
Ivan Duque
President of Colombia at Office of the President of Colombia

Today Programme on BBC Radio 4, television news on BBC1 & BBC World News. Interviewer. Documentaries on the EU referendum, Malala, Gandhi and the Arab uprisings. Alumna of Cambridge University (Law) and European University Institute, Florence

View the profile

1976, 1978, 1980 and 1982, elected to the US House of Representatives; 1984 and 1990, elected to the US Senate. 20 January 1993, inaugurated as the 45th Vice-President of the United States, and served eight years. Co-Founder and Chairman, Generation Investment Management. Senior Partner, Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. Member of the Board of Directors, Apple. Spends majority of time as Chairman, Climate Reality Project, a non-profit devoted to solving the climate crisis. Member of the Board of Trustees, World Economic Forum. Author of "Earth in the Balance", "An Inconvenient Truth", "The Assault on Reason", "Our Choice: A Plan To Solve the Climate Crisis", "The Future: Six Drivers of Global Change" and "An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power”. Subject of an Oscar-winning documentary, “An Inconvenient Truth”, and a new film which premiered in July 2017, “An Inconvenient Sequel: Truth to Power”. Co-Recipient, with the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize, for "informing the world of the dangers posed by climate change".

View the profile

1974, degree in Electronics Engineering, Aeronautics Institute of Technology-ITA, São José dos Campos, Brazil; 1983, PhD in Meteorology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology; 1988, Visiting Scientist, University of Maryland, USA. 1991-2003, Director, Center for Weather and Climate Forecasting (CPTEC-INPE); 2008-10, Director, Center for Earth System Science (CCST-INPE); 1998-2004, Program Scientist, Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia-LBA; 2006-11, Chair, International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP); 2011-14, National Secretary for R&D Policies, Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation of Brazil; 2015-16, president of Agendy of Post-Gratuate Education-CAPES. Scientific career dedicated to the Amazon region; developed pioneer research on the climate impacts of deforestation and climate change; proponent of the initiative Amazonia 4.0, an innovative proposal for a standing forest bioeconomy for the Amazon making use of modern technologies. Member of Brazilian Academy of Sciences; World Academy of Sciences, and foreign member of National Academy of Sciences of USA. Author and co-author of over 240 scientific articles, books and book chapters.

View the profile

Degree in Law, Universidad Sergio Arboleda; executive studies, Harvard; Master’s in Public Policy and Public Management, Georgetown University; Master’s in Economic Law, American University. Expert in economic affairs. Formerly: columnist and professor; Head, Culture, Creativity, and Solidarity Division, Inter-American Development Bank. As a Senator, put forward several laws: the Orange Law, which promotes creative industries and culture as an engine for development; the Law on Severance Funds, which permits parents use their severance funds to pre-pay their children’s education and that of their dependent persons; the Law on Defibrillators, which provides that all public places and emergency transport be equipped with resuscitation equipment in Colombia; the Law on “B Companies”, which provides the conditions for creating and establishing commercial companies of Collective Benefit and Interest; co-author of the law that extended maternity leave from 14 to 18 weeks. June 2018, elected President of Colombia. Author of several books: IndignAcción, ideas para el future de Colombia (IndignAcción: ideas for the Colombia of the future); Pecados Monetarios (Monetary Sins); Maquiavelo en Colombia (Machiavelli in Colombia); Efecto Naranja (Orange Effect); El Futuro Está en el Centro (The Future Lies in the Center) ; Arqueología de mi Padre (Archaeology of My Father); co-author, Economía Naranaja (Orange Economy).

View the profile

About the talk

Amazonian nations are hard-pressed to secure economic opportunities and social stability in a context of slow commodity-led growth. Which approaches are most promising for developing sustainable markets that maintain livelihoods while securing the future of the Amazon forest?

This session was developed in partnership with the BBC.

This session contributes to the work of the Forum’s Tropical Forest Alliance project.

Speakers: Jane Goodall, Al Gore, Mishal Husain, Carlos Afonso Nobre, Ivan Duque

The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.

World Economic Forum Website ► http://www.weforum.org/

Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/worldeconomicforum/

YouTube ► https://www.youtube.com/wef

Instagram ► https://www.instagram.com/worldeconomicforum/ 

Twitter ► https://twitter.com/wef

LinkedIn ► https://www.linkedin.com/company/world-economic-forum

TikTok ► https://www.tiktok.com/@worldeconomicforum

Flipboard ► https://flipboard.com/@WEF

#WorldEconomicForum #Davos2020 #SustainabilityForTheAmazon

Share

We are dropping as much heat in the earth system every day as would be released by 500,000 a roshima class atomic bombs everyday. Turn everyone thank you for being here for this special session on the Amazon and its future was an extraordinary one of the worst possible reasons in the Brazilian Amazon. It reached public Consciousness. Anyway, not seen for years that was thousands of files most of them started for the purpose of clearing land for crops for grazing and in the middle of all of that seven Amazonian country is Colombia Brazil Bolivia and

Ecuador Guyana and Suriname signed a new pact aimed at protecting the rainforest at the time of the Flies. However, many experts pointed to deforestation as the core issue for the Amazon and this session is dedicated to exploring how the rainforest weather in the Amazon or else we're can be safeguarded in a way that also secures sustainable livelihood and please do tweet used in the hashtag WTF. 20 as well use the panel delighted to have them with us Ivan Duque is the president of Colombia elected in 2018. He hosted of that

Summit in September last year which resulted in that seven a country packed. Dr. Jane Goodall is the primatologist best known for her work on chimpanzees in Tanzania Hair Institute has been involved with projects to combat deforestation that benefit both local communities and Forest dwelling wildlife and she's also an ambassador for the trillion Tree project that is just been announced as president of the United States from 1993 to 2001 his film An Inconvenient Truth was really a landmark in the whole discussion on climate change at Key moments about the raising of

awareness and he's on the Board of Trustees of the world economic forum and Carlos Alfonso. No Brasil leading Brazilian climate scientist directory search of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences a scientist. Hero to the end of lost are there was a moment of Destiny for the amazing as it moves from being a carbon sink to being a source of carbon emissions. So a warm welcome to you all if I can still with you tell us of your perspective on what was happening primarily in Brazil and Bolivia last year, but also very much on your doorstep

Express in this morning. The greatest issue a challenge of our time is climate change. So if we really want to as a society be able to contain the effects of climate change we need to protect the tropical forest. An important thing about the Amazon is that the Amazon Hose 50% of the world tropical jungle 1/4 percent of all the species in the world and in Latin America, we have almost 6 million square kilometers of Amazon basin a country like Colombia has 35% of its territory in the Amazon

cost. And what do we mean by protecting? We have to defeat deforestation in most of Latin American countries in the last decade. We have been losing a lot of tropical jungle in Columbia. We were losing something close to 200,000 hectares per year in the last decade. So when we do golfers 18 months ago, what decided to put this issue as one of the most important elements of our development plan, we have been able to reduce deforestation around the country. But we also made a Bitcoin to other nations

to have a new pet at a presidential level where we commit to 16 object is sharing information fighting deforestation and be able to have a reforestation plan to recover the areas that have been lost. So for example in Columbia, we have made a commitment that is now linked to this great initiative from the world economic Forum 1 trillion trees and we expect to plant 180 million trees before 2022 and something that is crucial. We want to launch a strategy that is being called is going to going to be called by your diverse cities.

So CDs that we have in different countries that are either in the Amazon or another sensible areas don't see things. Have to do to live protecting biodiversity and the environment so that we can have circular economy policies so that we can Embrace produce conserving and culture producing possible to have cities large-scale habitation in the size of of many countries in the world. So we need those societies to be able to do to preserve themselves to look at the future protecting the environment protecting the

ecosystems and protecting biodiversity. And we also have other cities in Latin America that are close to National Parks or too sensible areas, and we need the whole society to be able to protect and to learn the importance of those areas that all of the countries have signed it and it is aligned with the objective. Top 25 a major step in the environmental policy in Latin America during as you all guessing now, but how do you want this new level of international public Consciousness to be used? Thank you very much. I think

yes. I mean we sign this liking climate change science has been saying for decades warning and then action has been very slow for conserving truck. Of course. I think it's very similar the first paper we wrote about the risks of disappearance of the forest Amazon forest was 30 years ago 1990. However, it's important to have a very good understanding on the role of tropical forests. Tropical rainforest exist when there is a lot of rain. But also the force the forces themselves create 20 30% of the rain, so it's a biological climate Evolution

over millions of years. So what would you see in the Amazon? Fortunately, not so much in Colombia Amazon is near the end is there's more rainfall there. But these Southern Amazon Bolivia and Brazil seen the forest and the climate-changing. We are seeing the dry season be coming through become becoming longer. We are seeing Grace season temperature is increasing 3°. We are seeing the forest turning from being a carbon sink to being a carbon source and that's the area of Maximum deforestation. So it's up to reverse combination

of global heating which makes temperature higher and also more extreme drought everyone in the world in California in Australia in the Amazon. So these perverts combination is really pushing the force almost to exceed the Tipping Point. It's this Tipping Point is exceeded. It means that Fifty 60% of the Amazon forest. Will you turn into a dry Savannah? We are going to lose 203 billion hundred tons of CO2 carbon dioxide which will complicate even more Global heating. Will you lose

the climate instability? The Amazon forest is a climate stabilizer for the climate in South America. It produces moisture that feed systems in other parts of South America way from the Amazon. So we really lose a major treasure. So we really we are very close to the Tipping Point very the elements folding observing that so our calculations many compliments from science say if the temperature of the planet goes beyond 33.5 degrees or deforestation seat twenty 25% we are at

17% of the total base in the forest. We are going to cross the Tipping Point irreversibly. The river's Resort, we do not have much time. We have perhaps 15 maximum 30 years to drive to deforestation in the Amazon to zero and the restore a large area with new parts. Thank you for your work with as a primatologist and she'll work with chimpanzees in in Tanzania. At least that was how you work began. Have you? What can you tell us about what you have seen intensive what works

to protect the forest for the future? Okay. Well, you know for the first years I was in must with a chimpanzees unless enabled me also to be a must in the rainforest. And that it was the tile and the interconnection of all living things importance of every little species in maintaining the biodiversity of an ecosystem and familial. So the forest provided a very strong spiritual connection. I left this amazing wonderful. Of my life when I realized at a conference in

1986 that all across Africa the rainforest for disappearing through the forest for disappearing in Africa and chimpanzee numbers for decreasing and I just felt I needed to try and do something about it. I didn't know what to do went to Africa because I think you need to see firsthand what's going on to to put in a meaningful way and yes, I visited several countries. Where are chimpanzees rain. I learned a lot about the problems facing them a major one in most areas was deforestation. But at the same time I was learning

about so many of the the terrible problems faced by African peoples living in and around a chimpanzee habitat in some cases between poverty like a good health lack of education and everywhere with human populations growing the degradation of the land and when I flew over the tiny combination where I began in 1960 when it was part of the equatorial Forest belt across Africa by 1990. It was a small island of forest surrounded by completely by Hills and It

struck me, then the bubble people living there in the land would support the phone line was overused and then for tile the steep slopes had been denuded of trees and people is desperate effort to find Moreland promo food. Terrible soil erosion. The little streams getting self it up and that's when it hit me if we can do something to improve the lives of these people we have no hope of even trying to save the chimpanzees. It just wouldn't work. And so it was in 1994 that the Jane Goodall Institute again is program take care

or to carry as it's known in the 12 Villages around the small MB National Park every holistic program. Not a bunch of other than white people going into a pool African village. I'm telling them what we were going to do but a very small handpicked group of eight local tanzanians going into Asking them what they thought we could do to help them. It's turned into a very holistic program restoring fertility to be overused for men without chemicals could afford them. But one thing was a very small Grant from the European

Union. And then ask the people came to trust us and we got the tens any of those parties to do something about improved education and health. They they welcome to other dimensions that we suggested water management programs and then scholarships to keep clothes in school during and after puberty because it's being shy around the world is women's education improves family size drops and it was the growing human population. It was the worst problem destroying a florist in this area. Then we

introduced microcredit based on Muhammad yunus is grooming bank. And this was mainly for groups of women who could take out I need for the own environmentally sustainable project like Trina's Place menu of the Mad tree nurseries, and we provided the same to miss all the little saplings. And finally, we also gave workshops to the local people on Family Planning until it was a little group of local people who went around talkin about Family Planning which was well-received because that's the baby's Health

improved. So the women realize that they could have better control over their lives. It looks so well, but that little program is now in 104 Villages throughout chimpanzee rain, just to pull your microphone a little bit closer to you cuz I think I think that would be best. If everyone anywhere in the world that we've now introduced that program to six of the African countries, including you know, the Amazon is one of the great tropical rainforest and the

Congo Basin is the other so we have two programs in the Congo Basin using the same kind of approach and it's very sure that there are four is standing and expanding and chimpanzees and other animals in those forests. That wouldn't be bad if we hadn't moved in and so we Not only have the local people understood that protecting. The forest isn't just for wildlife. It's for their own future. And so we taught them the use of smartphones so that they probably volunteers from The Villages

go into that forest and monitor the health of the forest and I'm very proud and so we need help them understand the importance of conservation, but we've given them the tools so that we can move away and eventually they can do it for themselves to work employment is taking you all around the world. I wonder how you see the tension where it exists and it often does between preservation and development. The Brazilian government open says it is poverty. That is the enemy of the

rainforest. Well, thank you Michelle. And it's such a privilege to be on this panel. Jane Goodall has been a heroin of mine for a long time. I've had the privilege to work with her a bit in the nearest pass and it's always a privilege. Dr. Noble has been one of my teachers. I've learned a great deal from him and present Duke a thank you for your leadership. I've learned to greatly appreciate national leaders who understand and who take the initiative on these issues. So thank you very much. Of course, there are many things to say in answer

to your question. First of all, I want to highlight one point said Doctor no bright made 6 years ago. I do climate trainings for activist around the world 6 years ago. We had one in Rio de Janeiro in dr. No Bray was the was kind enough to help educate us all and I was very grateful, you know on the television weather news cast now, we often hear them speak about atmospheric Rivers. Not not so many years ago. You never heard that phrase. It really came in large part from the work of dr. No bright. He called them flying rivers.

And of course we've completely disrupted the water cycle of the earth. We are dropping as much heat in the earth system every day as would be released by 500,000 kuroshima class atomic bombs exploding everyday 93% of that goes into the ocean and that means the water vapor coming up off. The ocean is is greatly increased and it comes into the Amazon in the northeast of Brazil typically and makes a half circle around and then comes out to near Rio and sound Paulo.

When I was a child. There was a guy I don't know if it's still around call the slinky. Do you know what a slinky is one of the moments that I had the 30 years ago visiting the Amazon. I'm going up into the towers above the canopy. You can see great distance and when the rain storms would would fall. Your patient you just wait, I was there with your partner Tom Lovejoy. Tom and Carlos recently. Did this paper on the Tipping Point you wait a while and then you see this Miss rising from

the place where the rain fell and it moves down when and then you have another big downpour seem to me like a slinky going across the Amazon. If it lands in a place that's been burned or cleared then the progress is is halted. And of course when the phrase The Tipping Point is used what it describes is a a threshold Beyond which this natural Dynamic will will come to a halt and then the rainforest will not be a rainforest wolf flip into a a Savannah and the ecological Services provided to the entire world will

disappear now the world can you talk to anybody in a position of authority in Brazil and you will learn very quickly as I did 40 years ago. What no. No it is not for people in other nations to come and tell us what we do or what we should do and this must be respected. But I also want to point out we do not have on this panel. I'm not being critical at all. But I do want to point out. That we do not have an indigenous person here and I say that not out of political correctness, but as a way of highlighting the fact that they live there

and they have a history of management and ownership ownership, maybe a different concept. But in any case they must be respected and 30 years ago when I went I was prepared to meet with a rubber Tapper named Chico Mendes. He was murdered just before we could get there. There are people who have made ways of life in the Amazon did or not destructive and they too must be honored and finally, I would highlight of course the importance of the living species. So they've been mentioned about the incredible amount of biodiversity

in the Amazon. It makes it extra importance. So one final point. I said find a point this Define appointment. Because your question was about the relation to party. It's not widely understood that the soils in most of the Amazon or extremely thin the richness is in the canopy an MD in the wife and it has evolved over so long that's where it's so important but the sauce themselves are very thin. And so when there is a dream and I hope on the part of poor people from Northeastern Brazil or wherever who

come and clear the land and think they're going to have cropped crops year after year after year, it won't support it typically and so it's a it's a false hope and it is not a sustainable answer to Poverty. There are answers to poverty in this region. That's not one of them. Pick up then on what vice president Gore has said about that the lens of the outside Wells on the Amazon and how it is perceived. I mean no to be president bolsonaro already did not like the comments made by weather was Greta to Vogel president micro at the height of the size last summer. Do

you think she'll cells know it is all her becomes Amazon has maybe different ways of seeing it in the case of the countries that are in the a masonic region. We certainly believe that it's it's our star patrimony. What is social something that is crucial for the world. And I liked about the question you raised to vice president Gore about development and about the environment for many many years. The environment was wrongly perceived as the cost. What

is the most precious asset? We have the most precious asset and for many many years. The Amazon was left behind. And I consider that the packs that were signed into seventies. We're very important, but they were not really racing to the presidential level. What I like about the Leticia part, is that for the first time in many years what decided to bring the commitments to the presidential level? And we decided we have to protect the Amazon because it's ours but they also because it's important for the world. I'm particularly facing the

challenges that we face today due to climate change. So when we have the conversation last year was that okay? We have to prevent the fires. And it's not easy my sound easy, but it's not easy because in the dry season Jazz for the for the consequences of nature, you will face them by what we can do to prevent is not to allow people in the Amazon to use Fires for their sake of other types of production. And that's why we have to pay for environmental services and maybe we can go to some of those

communities and ask them to become Forest guards and The Weeknd make them the leaders of reforestation and Recovery that the land that we have lost in the last day you say something that's why when we have made the commitment of 180 million trees for 2022. We all suspect to go with indigenous communities and the leaders of the protection of the Amazon process and when we talked about the cities that are in the Amazon in Columbia, we have 5 or 6 in Brazil you have many do you have many Those cities that are in the Amazon

biodiverse cities cities that protect that have an ethical Behavior with with the Amazon and a tropical forest. That might work. I think you have to combine different different instruments one. You need to involve Academia. Do you need to involve the universities in the areas the planning of the Cities? They cannot be destructive the way you manage water. But also the way you involve communication production. That's why they shoot their economy policy. So important reduce reduce recycle and nnn be able

to create an ethical behavior of society since the very early childhood to all the inhabitants of the animatronic region. They will become the best promoters of the Amazon as a place that will protect the world from the effects of climate change. You have worked on something cool. The Amazon Third Way, tell us a little about it. well, you know Europeans came to to to the tropical forests of South America 500 years ago and they could not see any value in the forest there one heck of a tropical forest has 200

300 400 different species of trees several thousand different species of plants and animals and still 24 Century people go cut down the forest and replaced by grass cattle or soy Limitation on the potential and fortunately now we have a few examples of tangible examples. So then we go back to traditional knowledge and we combined with modern science. This is what we call Third Way or Amazonia 4.0. Let's get the one good example that comes from the Amazon the acai berry Soul traditional knowledge for thousands of years is a combination some Jose

or Agriculture agroforestry and force rotating off. They're likely depend on that medicines Foods everything. So with modern technology so we can introduce resources. Acai, berry Brinks 1.5 billion dollars to the Amazon Echo know me it's more than illegal Timber. It's less than only beat it uses 5% of the area of cattle ranches 5% 10 times more profitable. So this is the way we should proceed modern technology with traditional Norwegian traditional systems, which I've worked for thousands of years and then we

can really developed this new biovision. Is that new bioeconomy benefiting all the Amazonian concert benefiting the population and benefiting everybody else because we're going to keep the forest ending as Jane pointed out expanding as well. Jane that takes its ready to the trillion trees project. How important is it that the trees that are flaunt it true that all ones which will be valuable enough to go as far as possible to make you feel that they are not cut down by local communities or big Corporation

has a trillion Tree project. I think it's exciting because it means everybody can become involved everybody. Everybody can plan to three the important thing is to plan the right kind of tree in the right place at the right time and look after it. But right from the beginning for me, it's being protection of the existing rainforest. That's number one because of the biodiversity, but then what happened it going to be when I explained. It was like a little island of forests around by completely by Hills once the local people became involved.

If you fly over today, you don't see the Bay Hills and the lesson we get from that is the resilience of nature the fact that seeds buried under the ground as long as the ground hasn't been destroyed that too long have this amazing ability to come back and restore gradually and slowly expanding existing Forest outwards if given the chance, so the Trillium Tree Project now acknowledges the importance of saving our existing for his and restoring areas where the forest has Philly recently gone evening the oil palm

plantations and and then finally planting the trees because the climate crisis is so terrible and we know that more trees we have the more carbon can be drawn down from the atmosphere and Steward in the trees and the end of forest soils. So it's it's you know, it's a combination. We all need to get involved. We need to be involved. We involve children of the children and our route since youth program in 60 countries a planting trees. I understand the importance. They are protesting. When an area of Woodland Oak Forest around them is

going to be destroyed to get another shopping mall need any more shopping malls these three Grimm well for actually full brim things. We have to cope with we have to try and mitigate a number one is property because as I've said if you really poor you're going to cut down that I was trees, you know, there's going to be so literal version. You're not stupid the indigenous people of this wisdom, but you go to grow food and you've over used your phone on so what are you going to do this and more trees? And

so we have to do something about are unsustainable lifestyles of everybody else and thinking about this unsustainable lifestyle. We need a way of compensating people who are looking up to that forest for the benefit of us. We need those for us. We need the Amazon. We need the Congo we need for a sub from Columbia Wake Forest everywhere. We not paying for them. We need to eat less meat we need to to stop land being used for cattle and grind grind for billions of animals that we keep in our intensive phones,

and I know from experience and in Tanzania, one of our biggest problems is cattle moving into the forest and destroying others for it. So that that that they are, you know, I mean need to eliminate corruption and that's something for the politicians not me. And then finally we cannot We cannot hide away from human population growth because you know, it underlies so many of the other problems all these things we talked about wouldn't be a problem. If the Earth was the size of population that there was five hundred years ago. I'm going to offer for view for

closing throat in just a moment. But before we get to that vice-president go Warsaw the initiatives that give you the most hope that avoiding the Tipping Point that Carlos know where it says where any 15 to 30 years away from sniffing the rainforest into a dry Savannah. Well, I think the the Young Generation is a source of Hope there have been many occasions in human history when morally base social revolutions gain the momentum necessary when the Young Generation takes on the cause

and she is quick to deflect to all of the others who have followed her lead and joined her in leading. This is a global phenomena that gives me a great deal of Hope in some of the Business Leaders that make up such a large percentage of the crowd that comes here at the Davos will tell you that they cannot hire the best and brightest in the new generation unless they can convince them that their companies that share the values that this young Rising generation that holds out to be so important. So that is a real source of hope.

I wanted to come and briefly on. things that were said first of all planting and then caring for the trees the late departed OneGuard might I was a dear friend and you knew or the green belt movement and she taught that it's not just the planting of the trees. It's the caring for in stewarding the growth of those trees until they reach a height in an age of sustainability this one trillion tree initiative that Klaus Schwab in the Forum are promoting Marc benioff has been so terrific in promoting. This is an important initiative, but we're

losing one football fields worth of the existing Forest. Every second offense. Oh, yes, we have to stop the destruction in the Amazon and Indonesia and Malaysia in the Southeast Asian archipelago and in central of the central part of Africa week, we have to do that one final point on the genetic resources that are so valuable you mention the acai If history serves correctly, if memory serves correctly the first really valuable indigenous resource was the rubber tree and before the synthetic materials of which cars are now made

existed rubber was a strategic resource, but it's interesting to look at the history. It was a source of great income. But the first steamship to come up the amazon to manaus left with a stolen cargo of young rubber tree plants. The sailing ships could not take them back across the Atlantic soon enough to keep them alive. But the steamship took them to green houses in the UK the following you were transplanted to salon now Sri Lanka then to Malaysia and so the the highlighting of these incredibly valuable

genetic resources is perfectly it's also a source of help but it trigger in the Brazilian Community these memories of foreigners coming in and stealing those resources until this is a memory that must be kept in mind and we have to navigate around that and respect the feelings that are still Keen there. 1 minute something that you would like to be different by this time next year president Duque achieve for basic results. This has to be comprehensive and it involves different actions. We passed in Columbia from less than 60 megawatts of installed capacity

in unconventional Renewables to 2250 by 2022 next year. We want to have 30% of those projects going on. We have already reduce deforestation by 17% We hope next year that we can get to the goal that we have salvation getting close to 30% and the third most important thing. We need to have a holistic view against deforestation. We launched the first National Council against deforestation and we launched the Artemis campaign to fight illegal production of word and illegal trade of species and

Northern kind of crime. Michael for next year is that through wild the message of the carrot and the stick sanctioning the criminals but at the same time empowering communities to reforest and to protect the Amazon can make Columbia the leader in Latin America against deforestation see that we had much lower deforestation and fires in the Amazon much much lower will really start the pathway of zeros in a few years. For that it's essential to have a different station free supply chain global

global and also that the leadership of business which meet here every year and the of finances also support is deforestation free Supply chains and also support the emergence of new economy this new biome economy for all tropical forests, especially for the Amazon. I hope that the sense of urgency next year is even greater than it is this year this crisis the climate crisis. Is way worse than people generally realize way worth. It is getting worse still way faster than people realize. The burden to act

that is on the shoulders of the generation of people alive today. He is a challenge to our moral imagination. But this is Thermopylae. This is option for this is the Battle of the Bulge. This is Dunkirk. This is 911. We have to rise to this occasion. We have the tools. We have the solutions. We know what to do. We lack the requisite political will. For anyone who doubts that we as human beings has have the capacity to rise above our limitations and transcend the difficulties. We now face remember that political will

is itself a renewable resource? And Jane Goodall you'll closing to let you know I spend my time working with young people young people who show up and have lost hope because they read what about the Doom in the Gloom. They know about the climate crisis. It's very real or around the world everywhere I go and so my hope is that we can increase the level of education and understanding not only but specially in and I'll use and that we can increase the level of funding so that they can do more because the young people know what needs to be done.

But very often that on the resources for them to actually do it that on the people who will listen, so I want to grow Roots & Shoots program have more Partnerships with other youth programs and Gifts the youth because if you lose, hope you give up you Do nothing. I'm sorry. We cannot do that. Thank you all very much. Jane Goodall algol. Call us. No break president Duque. Thank you all very much indeed.

Cackle comments for the website

Buy this talk

Access to the talk “Securing a Sustainable Future for the Amazon | DAVOS 2020”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Access to all the recordings of the event

Get access to all videos “World Economic Forum 2020”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Ticket

Interested in topic “Finance and FinTech”?

You might be interested in videos from this event

April 23 - 24, 2019
Singapore
23
346
bitmain, blockchain, crypto, cryptocurrency, fintech, fundraising, game, government, investment

Similar talks

Ivan Duque
President of Colombia at Office of the President of Colombia
+ 5 speakers
Dominic Kailash Nath Waughray
Managing Director, Centre for Global Public Goods; Member of Managing Board at World Economic Forum
+ 5 speakers
Marc Benioff
Chairman and C.E.O. at Salesforce
+ 5 speakers
Jane Goodall
Founder at Jane Goodall Institute
+ 5 speakers
Hindou Oumarou Ibrahim
President at Association for Indigenous Women and Peoples of Chad (AFPAT)
+ 5 speakers
Jaggi Vasudev
Founder at Jaggi Vasudev
+ 5 speakers
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Sanna Marin
Prime Minister of Finland at Office of the Prime Minister of Finland
+ 5 speakers
Scott Minerd
Managing Partner, Chairman of Guggenheim Investments and Global Chief Investment Officer at Guggenheim Partners
+ 5 speakers
Gabriel O'Donnell
Principal Research Programmer at Carnegie Mellon University at Carnegie Mellon University
+ 5 speakers
Gail Whiteman
Director at Pentland Centre for Sustainability in Business, Lancaster University Management School (LUMS)
+ 5 speakers
Elena Cherney
Editor at News Features and Special Projects, The Wall Street Journal
+ 5 speakers
Al Gore
Chairman and Co-Founder at Generation Investment Management LLP
+ 5 speakers
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Mohamad Al Jounde
Member of the Board at Gharsah Sweden
+ 4 speakers
Paul Stoffels
Vice-Chairman at Executive Committee
+ 4 speakers
Sarah Kelly
Anchor-at-Large at Deutsche Welle
+ 4 speakers
Achim Steiner
Administrator at United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)
+ 4 speakers
Wanjuhi Njoroge
Global Shaper at Nairobi Hub
+ 4 speakers
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Buy this video

Video

Access to the talk “Securing a Sustainable Future for the Amazon | DAVOS 2020”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Conference Cast

With ConferenceCast.tv, you get access to our library of the world's best conference talks.

Conference Cast
558 conferences
22053 speakers
8194 hours of content