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Molly Burke & Edward Ndopu: Closing the Disability Inclusion Gap | DAVOS 2020

Edward Ndopu
United Nations Secretary-General's Advocate for the Sustainable Development Goals at United Nations
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World Economic Forum 2020
January 23, 2020, Davos, Switzerland
World Economic Forum 2020
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Molly Burke & Edward Ndopu: Closing the Disability Inclusion Gap | DAVOS 2020
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About speakers

Edward Ndopu
United Nations Secretary-General's Advocate for the Sustainable Development Goals at United Nations
Molly Burke
YouTuber, Motivational Speaker, Author and Commercial Model at Molly Burke Corp.
Caroline Casey
Founder and Director at The Valuable 500

Mr. Ndopu is an award winning, internationally acclaimed activist and humanitarian. Diagnosed with Spinal Muscular Atrophy at age two and given only five years to live, he has gone on to become a beacon of hope and possibility for people with disabilities around the world. In recognition of this, Mr. Ndopu was recently appointed by the Secretary-General of the United Nations to serve as a Member of the UN Advocacy Group for the Sustainable Development Goals. He also serves as Special Advisor to the Partners of RTW Investments, a leading investor in scientific and medical innovation. Mr. Ndopu has also advised organizations such as the World Economic Forum, UN Women and Amnesty International. Mr. Ndopu holds a Master’s in Public Policy from Oxford University and is currently setting in motion plans to deliver a televised address to the UN from Space, in an effort to inspire greater ambition around the SDGs. This will make him the first physically disabled person to travel into space.

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Author, motivational speaker, commercial model and YouTube star. At four-years‐old, diagnosed with Retinitis Pigmentosa, a rare retinal disease causing loss of vision. Began public speaking at the age of five as an ambassador for Fighting Blindness Canada. Openly shares experiences of overcoming adversity and embracing diversity, and increased social media followership to almost 3 million. 2019, wrote and published an audiobook “It’s Not What It Looks Like”. Has worked with a number of Fortune 500 companies; consultant for disability inclusion with P&G.

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Social entrepreneur, adventurer and business woman. Subject of the National Geographic Documentary Elephant Vision, Ashoka Fellow, Eisenhower Fellow, Counsellor for One Young World, World Economic Forum Young Global Leader, TED speaker, past adviser for the Clinton Global Initiative and campaigner. Since making a life-changing decision at 28 to leave career as a management consultant and travel across India on an elephant, has been committed to building a global movement on inclusive business to build an equal society for the 1 billion people in the world with a disability. Has set up several organizations and initiatives centred on disability business inclusion. #Valuable, the most recent campaign, launched in August 2017, a global call to action for business to recognize the value of the 1 billion people with disabilities across their supply chain, reached 810 million people. Now, #valuable is working with chief executive officers, brands and platforms to put disability on the global business leadership agenda.

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About the talk

While nine out of 10 companies claim to prioritize diversity, only 4% have specific programmes that are disability inclusive. What strategies and best practices can close the disability gap at work?

Speakers: Edward Ndopu, Molly Burke, Caroline Casey

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I model for brands that are like, we have representation and don't get me wrong, I'm grateful for the opportunities that they've allowed me and that they care. But that shouldn't be the exception. That shouldn't be the tagline of a marketing campaign that should be the norm to give a little frame of today. We are here to talk about his closing. The inclusion gospel disability. As the founder of the possible. 500. Last year we made history because we got disability on the main stage of Zappos. What's 5 of the world's most influential CEOs?

And then we launched the value of 500 which was two gases. I got arconic mission to get five of the world's most influential bronze undersea us with disability on the leadership agenda to stop disability being on the sidelines of business. Because when business does not see the value of people with disabilities in society, we don't need your pity or your charity. We need to see that we have value and talents and consumer spending power and Innovation when opportunity for growth and differentiation, I can go on. But we see. And I'm so delighted to say at a press conference in

Tuesday with Eddie join. Before we announce 242 companies, and that's extraordinary and that represents 2.6 trillion in Revenue. 10 million employees, 24 countries, enforced to sectors. Now, we sit a trigger for this and the reason that visitors should be so interested because you're fascinated by talent and growth and we have to reach the Next Generation. The second is digital Revolution on social media and Technology. I swore last year that we have the most famous Theo's in the

world sitting on her, and this year, I wanted to bring some of the most influential young people with little experience of disability because this is a new generation. It's a new voice. It's after apparel business that you don't engage with us. And I could not be more proud than to have these two or three. Here with me. We're going to have a really Cana Sassy conversation. I think. Yeah, we are these the conversation going to have. I'm going to just talk a little. I'm not going to read out these two five humans bios because there's nothing

worse than a telling our own stories. I'm going to ask him. Tell you those stories. And I'm also going to go to ask him to talk about their Ambitions and what their experience of dog was on the last is a message to business. Now, get your questions on because we're going to give you a little room. If you're interesting at the end, So I'm going to begin to. My left is heading over to do and to my rice is Molly Burke. I'm going to ask both of you to tell us a little bit about yourselves so that we can get to know you and everybody else watching

online. So I just want to Star thrilled to be on this panel and I really want to just take a moment to so that you Kyle and thank you for amplifying our voices and put some disability at the Forefront of the global agenda. What you are doing is demonstrating to the business Elite to political leaders that people with disabilities. I scared to stay. We're not going anywhere and we are here to demonstrate to all of you that we have enormous capacity for

leadership that we are able to not only contribute to our workplaces in our society but also helped shape the trajectory of humanity. So I Am Legend, dog food. I am a twenty-nine-year-old activist. Humanitarian, I serve as one of mr. Antonio guterres has 17 Global advocates for the sustainable development goals. I am. Also the first African American Disability to graduate from the University of Oxford and I am on a mission to ensure that nobody gets left behind particularly people with disabilities. And that we are able to

make a dent on Extreme poverty and inequality and climate change by the year 2030. Thursday of disability percentage acquire between the ages of 18 and 64. So I'm going to charge my in a second and also, 80% disability is invisible, if you have a moment to Dad's, Who Loved all of us, I am registered line as well, but it's 54% of our consumer base. So now I'm going to turn tamales tamales. Yes. So I'm up here with two of my favorite people. Three of my favorite people. This is a lot to say on this topic,

so my name is Molly Burke. I am pretty much completely blind. Although I might not look like it which will get into later, don't worry. So, you know, I like to say that the disability Community is one of the only minority groups are the only minority group that anybody can join at any point in their life, as Caroline just said, majority of disabled people weren't born that way. And in my case, I wasn't diagnosed with my disease until I was four years old and my disease. Retinitis Pigmentosa took my sight, when I was 14 years old,

And you know what? That time I went through severe depression. I lost all of my friends was severely bullied and you know, thanks Lee. I went on the long journey of recovery to be where I am today. I am now a YouTuber with 3 million followers cross-platform same and author of a best-selling book. It's not what it looks like. I am a motivational speaker. I've traveled the world with some of some of the people that are here at West speaking to audiences as large as 20,000 of time. And I'm a commercial model working with Incredible diverse Brands like doves and American Eagle

and Samsung. And I'm really pleased to be here to share some of my experiences and perspectives on such an important topic. That's seriously. This is talent to start with. What is he going to start with? What is your one thing that you want to do two in the global context of disability and changing? What is it? What is it? What is your both? Your passion point about representation. So who wants to jump in about? Well, I have long said that those that came before. Me

have fought really hard, disabled, people fought really hard for legal recognition, for human rights for people with disabilities and I think the next Frontier for the disability movement is to actually think about what does accessible didn't look like beyond the environment. What does it look like Beyond legislation? How do we ensure that we move Beyond zero, and zero? For me, is a signifier for compliance as a compliance logic. That seems to understand all of the conversations when it comes to this ability. Is there a rad? Is there sign. Language

interpretation, is there a braille, but what happens? Once we're in the building, what happens we in spaces is our Humanity, adequately affirmed is our talent, adequately affirmed. And so, my vision globally is to ensure We move the discourse Beyond zero. We go beyond compliance would go beyond rhetoric and we affirm and validate the genius and the Brilliance of people with disabilities everywhere. The way that I intend doing that is by by becoming the first physically disabled person to go to

space. And that. And I'm delighted to confirm that on the eve of my participation here in Davos. It was announced globally that I will be at. I just secured a zero gravity flight and I will be going wait list in May of this year and in, so doing showing the world that, you know, we we defy gravity, we defy gravity. That's what we do, we defy the odds, we defy gravity and so it is a symbolic victory for people with disabilities, but specifically people with disabilities from where I come from

the continent of Africa to show that those of us that are on the margins of society have within nothing, normal capacity to transform the world. And so that's that's it's about changing the world in real time. And it's nothing but I can I just say it's the first thing that everybody ask you. When you talk about this zero fly space did they go to the kind of look at him go he's physically going to be able to do a lot of that. I get that all the time and it it's an interesting one because I think People

do a lot of adventurous things, people throw themselves out of planes, people, you know, ride motor bicycle, do all of these things, but nobody really asks, non-disabled, people, are you sure you can do that? Are you, why are you helping up? Are you fit enough for you? I I, I am, I am and I go through the same rigor, the same process of anybody else would. And I think if there is a 7, s. S i t that is most capable of being able to do all of these weird and wonderful thing

we have tenacity because that is what is required to live on a day-to-day basis. The resourceful. Next up, we need in order to step out of our homes and confront the world on a day-to-day basis and hold our heads High. Take that, I said that it's a prerequisite for space travel. I think to your point, I don't ask a lot of people, what can you do that? I think Society loves to decide our limitations for us to decide what we're capable of for us. Instead of just realizing that we live our life, right?

And if we're not capable will ask for help will let you know where the first to raise our hand because we live life every single day having to constantly advocate for ourselves. Believe me, if there's something I can't do. I'm going to be the first to put my hand up and say it, I'm already doing just fine, but like it does. Also, I think the lived experience of disability requires creativity in Norman's, creativity the most creative job in the world.

Audible and it's exactly. It's a creative life. Forces you to think outside the box every single day when we were talking, before we're coming in, is this perception of what disability do I just got to talk about the controversy of the representation. So we had the panel that 500 on Tuesday and came out afterwards and they were like, what would be great if it was some actual people with disabilities on that panel and Eddie and I are sitting on that panel and I'm serious and Eddie and Caroline. And then the person, she's

not blind enough. I'm going to turn to Molly on this cuz this is something that we spoke up. Louder. Voice is wobbling here. First thing is often people say whether you're blind why you wearing heels, just talked to me a little bit about representation and what your big ambition. I think you've been trolled. Haven't you about? Are you are you related to me? Faking blind on the internet. Trust me. It's it's a constant question I get daily. It's growing up. I dreamed of working in the entertainment industry. I don't work in this industry because I am

just trying to break barriers to my community. I work in this industry cuz this is my passion, this is the industry. I've always loved and always dreamed of being a part of I was just five years old. When I told my mom and dad that I was going to move to Hollywood and be an actress actress and so I was never going to let him. Stop it. Stop being said, at that time, that I said that I didn't, I didn't know that I was going to go blind. I didn't have any understanding of what going blind meant for how society would send you me and treat me and so

when I did go blind it. 14, I did give up on that dream. I thought I can't be an actress. I can't be a model people. Like me don't exist in Hollywood. We're not cats, we're not hired, we're not seen and not only did that squash my dream. I also began to see how not having people like me in media. Whether it be you know, scripted or in commercial marketing, not having people like me accurately represented meant that Society now viewed me and treated me differently. Because whenever they did see me represented, it was in an

authentic inaccurate and often done by able-bodied people. Impersonating us, which frankly is the blackface, we still allowed It's okay for able-bodied people to play disabled people. That's the blackface. We still allowed me to get. So for me, I constantly grew up with people saying I was faking it, I didn't look blind because I love makeup. I love tattoos, I love room, decor, I left fashion. You know, my eyes are green. All the reasons that people have been able to come up with for me not being blind and it all goes back to what they've seen in movies

and on television is blind, people wear dark sunglasses line people, you know, I wouldn't care about the visuals Aesthetics that, you know, blind. People are incapable that we rely on other people to help us blind, people have grey foggy glass over our eyes. Well, sure there's certain people who have diseases like cataracts that cause that, but I don't have that my disease affects the inside of my eye. And I've been to tell you this, if you look at the inside of my eye, it's all sorts of messed up because Spirit on the outside. And so, that's the real issue with, with the

lack of representation, is it affect us in real time, every single day, but the issue of representation, I mean, a few blocks from your perspective. Well, I I, I mean, I completely agree with what Mommy just said, I, I think that I think that we you know you know we talked about intersectionality is this buzz word that people love soda vending about but actually intersectionality is more than just gluing together, a lots of identities. It's more than that. It's about having multiple worldviews multiple experiences at the same time and not need to be celebrated because all of us and body a

multiplicity of experiences at the same time we are never just one thing. We are many things all of the time at the same time. So it's very weird for me when people try to sue the compartments like me. I am physically disabled. I'm black. I'm gay. I'm all of these things at the same time. I'm so. So even from a policy standpoint, why is it that we compartmentalize? When an actual fact, we need to affirm the fact that we and brought you all of these identities of the same time. And so I think culture plays a very important role. I think that there is Shaun, legal recognition is

incredibly important but where the Tipping Point happened is when we see diverse and nuanced and complicated depictions of the lives of people with disabilities in all of out Splendor and in all of our Glory. But is about Hollywood, it is about the magazines. It is about the rooms that we saw the find ourselves and like the ones here at the wall, the Konami for mandalas all of these things matter because you can't become what you don't see, but you Fashion and beauty.

And so, where you going? What's your next kind of Korean version of what, what are you going to do for the next few years? Like, yeah, I mean Beauty and Fashion industry as a group training to be an actress in a model and the beauty and fashion industry is is initially what got me into YouTube as a viewer? I fell in love with the beauty and lifestyle and fashion community on YouTube because I didn't have friends anymore in real life. You don't 14 15 years old, I find myself blind lost all my friends and I turn to the girls on YouTube because I did not scroll. So shocked, I didn't have

girls have sleepovers with and talk about boys with and all these things. So I found these girls online that were just like me, have the same passions and interests and although they weren't blind. I connected with them on my passions and so that's what got me into the YouTuber. Alden and then, you know, 5-6 years later. I began my own channel. And of course, because I'm passionate about it. I talk on my channel a lot about beauty and a lot about fashion as a disabled woman, yes. But just as a woman who loves it, and one of the things that is, is a constant frustration.

For me, is that it's the one industry that I feel like has denied me being a part of it. The most, what, what do you mean? I mean your modeling. So what do you mean? Do they use real women? I model for brands that are like we have representation and don't get me wrong, I'm grateful for the opportunities that they've allowed me and that they care. But that shouldn't be the exception. That shouldn't be the tagline of a marketing campaign that should be the norm. And so for me. Yeah, I've had two to three brands that have been like, come on board

wheel of representation, but for the most part over all this particularly Beauty, It is is closed the door in my face, not just, you know, it's it's funny. All these magazines, they do these big glossy things about me, like Beauty influencer, but I don't think any other Beauty YouTuber would ever invite me into their Circle, or call me if you use with YouTuber. I'm so lucky that Allure magazine has really kind of thought in my corner. And they've done, you know, what massive spread on me. They've done videos with me and, you

know, Allure magazine. I think are arguably, is the biggest Beauty specific magazine magazine and so realistically, that's where all the beauty brands are looking for, you know, what's happening with hot with him on the scene and France reached out after the big spread more like a weed, like love to send you like a box of products. It's like okay, pay me and let's work together. I don't just need your free p. R. I have enough money to buy your products. Thank you.

But let's work together. And every time that conversation comes they just shut the door. They act like, I'm just so lucky to be in their presence. I'm not lucky to be here. I deserve to be here cuz I've worked for it. And I'm about as valuable to you, as you are to me, I bring a unique and different perspective to an industry. That's been walking the same Circle, four years in in an industry. That's been called. So you know, shallow and and all of these things I bring the perspective of it's not what it looks like which happens to be the name of my best selling book but I bring

the perspective of actual fashion and Beauty runs deeper than the Aesthetics fashion. And Beauty are about self-expression about creativity about confidence and that's a story worth telling. And I have the most authentic way to tell that, What every brand likes to close the door in my face and say, well, let me just give you some examples of what specific beauty brands of said, I won't name and shame, but we've had brand say things to my manager. Like, if we put her on her billboard, nobody will see that she's a minority. Are you kidding me? You said you were going back

to its tokenism. You would only use me for tokenism. We've had brand say, well she's not a professional makeup artist school half the other YouTubers you work with are neither and it doesn't affect your ability to work with them. So it's, it's yeah, she's just not, she's not, you know, it's sensible to everybody. Not everybody can relate to her. Lived experiences will, that's why it's an important experience to share. So it's really crazy two things. That but I think, I think we have to accept where it is and I, and I think it's great having you getting up and speaking about it because that

will change it. And if we move on from beauty, to to representation and accessibility, I think he wants to do right between our our ears, right? I mean, this is how I access were interested is our mind, right? So, fun Mali perspective, but can you give us what your face challenge? You want to do and listen to people here in this room when I tried to trim, who can help you with your insanely? Ambitious Target when I was appointed by the Secretary General of the UN to serve as an advocate for the sdgs, I reflected on. How can I use my

platform to ensure that were able to promote accessibility globally and that it becomes part and parcel of the un's global agenda. But also Humanity's Global agenda and one of the things I realized is that there is no umbrella fund, a global fund that involve both public and private sector to come together and put Capital behind the collective commitment to ensure that accessibility becomes real for people with disabilities. So explain what you mean by accessibility.

Vici Capilli, we talked about the entire value chain everything from getting it, we talked about the built environment, so infrastructure and showing the people have adequate Transit that people have adequate accommodation to the bacon. Get from point A to point B and actually exercise their freedom of movement within about access to financial security. For example, we always speak about the relationship between poverty and disability. We never speak about the link between Financial security and disability or dare I say wealth and disability, which is just absolutely mind-boggling.

So, the vision for This, Global access fund is to be able to mobilize 1 billion dollars. To ensure that we are able to scale existing initiatives around accessibility in service of the 1.3 billion people of this with disabilities. Living on the planet today, since I'm bringing together, private-sector and public-sector private. And the public sector to ensure that we can institutionalize, accessibility, Bill, any large-scale, infrastructure project, what's happening in the world needs to think about accessibility from the beginning, from

the outset on the African continent. We have something called agenda 2063 which is a blueprint, a vision of what the continent would look like by the year 2053. From an urban planning perspective. How do we ensure that people with disabilities are not as an afterthought but front-and-center of all of the large-scale Investments that happened to my vision? For This, Global fund, is that it will help to bridge the act of gaps and deploy capital and finding where it's required to. The accessibility becomes part and parcel of all of our investments and an hour of

global development objectives. So you can say the energy and the ambition here, would anybody like to ask a question? Cuz I got two loads questions that I want to continue to ask but I am here who would like to ask a question of Eddie and Molly on Sunday, give me a time. Check as well cuz I can talk to see any watches or timing. I look at. How much more do you have to ask the question before I dive into more because I will haunt anyone here? Think this is a conversation for all of us and I think I would be very

comfortable to ask anything, right people on the internet. Don't hold back. I've heard it all here. Hi Mexican friend. What you were saying about all this about working with Brands? And more of a question, I would like to share some experience at the YouTuber to, I think, The best way. For Brands to see the value is to do what you're already doing which is Paving the way I think you need to understand that you are stepping into the unknown. And you are

being the first one on carrying that torch and you are being the concept that is proving that it works. So, of course, it's being tough because you are the only one building this Tunnel, right? So all I can say is congratulations and keep doing it because I promise you that those friends that see the value, welcome mean. I'm I'm, I'm very grateful for the ones who do see my value because They don't treat me like I'm lucky and I'm very grateful for that. They see that I'm actually doing something important

so I'm absolutely so grateful and I'm so grateful to have been one of the first disabled YouTubers because two major lakmali. Can I just tell you made your luck to you on the place? You went out in Ford what you did to you? If you guys made any push-up, why do you think you got energy? Is it from your parents house? Which both our moms are here, is there in the audience has and I had grape, I think you've both got there. Like you didn't get this on a tight either of you?

I think. When every day, the world still fights against you. The only way to keep going is is that the fight back? And I don't mean to fight in a negative way of you know what, I'm not. I don't I don't walk around every day going, I'm so oppressed, it's not about that. But you know, often with with being in the entertainment industry as your things like oh don't get cocky don't get full of yourself and I always say to them it's it's really hard to get yourself when every day you are still discriminated against and everyday you were still

judged. And I think the best example of that is I was in an Oscars commercial with Samsung. And I think anybody in this room can recognize that being an Oscars commercial, is that a big step in a career in the entertainment industry? And I was at this Oscars party and we're watching the commercial and we're celebrating, we're so excited and then I leave the party and I'm denied access to a vehicle home. because of my guy talk, And in that moment it doesn't matter that I was just in an Oscars commercial. What matters is I'm being denied a basic human, right? And that happens

daily self 4. I'd say all of us. And so when that is your reality, you don't have, you have two options in life. You have the option to stay home, to hide yourself away from the world to cry, to be bitter, to be depressed, to be angry. Or you fight, you fight for change. You fight for acceptance? And I did the angry depressed. Why me laying in my bed? Today, when I went blind, And you can only live that for so long before you decide. Is this it or do I? Give it one more go and and I was at the point of saying that this is it and I'm lucky that people

stepped in and give me the support and help me build myself up. And I just remember, being fifteen years old and turning to my mom. And I said, I can't be angry at societies ignorance. If I'm not willing to do something to educate Society, And it was done that, I knew that I have to dedicate my life. The fighting for our community, the Fighting For Change. It's so interesting, listen to your what 20 years younger than me on. I can feel that, you know, the time that used to take accountability and responsibility for your life experience and not wait for my shift to

to fix you or or make it easier for you. Even very different experience to Molly. I'm you got the Oxford. You, if you think about you and reinforce in November, you is going to go billion dollar company. Or did you have when we need to pick it up a couple mean, can you explain a little bit to ask about your story from that perspective? I think that. it's never just one moment and I think it's It's a process of becoming successes about process of becoming, it's not a state of being. It's not a Vicks point that we used to do find ourselves in

and wake up and stay awhile. I, I feel like I'm one of a kind. Everything is, it's a daily battle and add any struggle. And I think for me, I I've been accused of Different disability exceptionalism, right? So, I did exactly right for our Humanity to be a friend, right? That we needed to live, like, go far by the Beyond and I understand that and and and there's a legitimate argument to be made there. But what I am advocating for is space and freedom for disabled people to be exceptional. So we had the right to be ordinary but we also had the right to the extraordinary. We can be

extraordinary and that is a legitimate right? But I am fighting for and so my life is really about that it's about showing the world that have that disability and living an extraordinary life can go hand-in-hand. And until I think that reminder is what keeps me going and what forces me to keep fighting for a world that goes beyond compliance a world that goes beyond the minimum threshold that we are told to accept and be happy when I want to go back to the

moments where we were when young world and I know you wanted to desperately meet Richard Branson Backspace. Just just, you know, I think I love the fact that were sitting there going to be, alright, to be ordinary, and right to be angry, right? To be normally, right to be snagged, right? To be happy, right? To be emotional, actually. That's it. Invitation to all human things to do with this ability. Why is this his decision, which Pokemon are most of their belongings? But I think one of the things I saw in you. They was just stopped

moments of missing. Some of that you want, not because you want to meet with your pants but you want to talk about that cuz it was an extraordinary. I had no idea whether it would actually happen and we were in the same building. Richard Branson was upstairs, he should have tipped us off and said that he's upstairs. So we left everything that we were doing. We went into the elevator a week. So there's a negotiated through security and found ourselves in the same room as him and I remember it. So clearly Highline walk towards that.

And it was out of body experience and and you into introduced me and and I don't even remember everything I said, but it was it wasn't even about the meeting. I think it was an affirmation in that moment that Wow. It is possible. It really is possible. We can find ourselves in the same spaces and we can show up and rise to the occasion when the moment The lines of it, I think it was cuz it was like a vision impaired person in and out of doors and it slammed into a

big dream for you. And I think everybody needs to keep an eye on this gentleman because I see the 23rd of May around here kind of cars and motorbikes and now, you're taking over. What is this thing? You have with car is so what are you looking for here for you? And I know the same except we have the same experience and that is when you are blind, I think every blind person can join me in saying that it is. The number one moment of being like, Oh my God I'm not going to drive. That is like that is the thing that is a pinnacle of being like, Oh yeah, the

hardest part of land it like I can't drive. It's one of those frustrations because it's that thing we all look forward to and we're turning 16 or 15 or 17, whatever it is in your country where you get to, like, get your license in your freedom and you're going into adulthood and, you know, we don't, we don't get that moment and that's a big part of growing up and realizing what your future holds as a blind person. So for me as a YouTuber, I'm constantly thinking and I put out two videos a week, I'm completing of content and ideas and ways in

which that I cannot just make content that's entertaining. But content does impactful and I do a lot of content around, you know, trying to achieve dreams and goals and overcoming challenges and I thought of this series and The biggest challenge in accomplishing, the series is that I ultimately need a sponsorship, a partner in the car industry to come in on this. I need to find my Richard Branson's so funny but he knows anybody hook me up. But basically, the concept is, I want to be a

blind girl who buys and drives my own car, and I'll give you the contacts, cuz that sounds crazy and dangerous. Exactly, for you. So basically, you know, most of my audience is 18235 there in that Prime car shopping buying age. So I want to go on that experience with them. I want to do something that I answer. I never thought I would, I want to go to car dealerships in the end. Learn about cars. What's a car loan? What is you know what's financing it versus the loan vs leasing, you know I want to see you like what what should you look for what it do you know gas emissions.

All these things that we look for in offers car for me would be does my kind of outfit. That's a real real challenge with a 95 lb dog. And then you know, picking my car buying my car. Getting it all customized and swagged out. And then going to the Salt Flats in Utah. Where it is fully legal for flying to come with the private stash and freaking want. And I want to floor it in my pink car and I want to do that because I wanted ad people like well why don't you just get a car and drive it. Like why you have to like own your own car?

Because I'm a lady boss, and I can own my own car and somebody else is driving around in it. And I want to show people that there's all of these challenges that everybody's going to face in life. And there's these things that Society will tell us, we can't do and we will tell ourselves, we can't do. But you just have to find a way around it. So can I buy and drive my own car? Yes. In the Salt Flats but not an everyday life, but in everyday life, you know I have a full-time assistant that works for me that currently drives me to all my events, you know, in her car.

Why can't you drive me in my car? Because I heard woman who runs a business and deserves to have my beautiful swag, Dale, pink car and be driven around so that is my car series dream. So don't go out for what is Markus. Persson off the pink hats with my car. Lets you are seriously. So what is your version of pink cats by cars that they say that you cannot have? Because you have to be real. What is your personal? Come on, turn off with you. If I mean,

Look, I and I mean it's not just one thing I mean there's so many things I I my gym always a sensitive. Have my own Penthouse Unison, overlooking go on overlooking the most extraordinary View and I already have a name for the residents is going to be called Cloud 9, accept any way that white hair. It's, it's a very specific dream, but I, I think you're right there on that. I'd like to know what we both thing is that it's about, allowing us the space and the freedom to be who ever want to be to be able to harness our imagination in service is not an improving out all

night but using our lives to be able to impact. Our communities are countries, are society's the globe at large and so it it something might see this Trivial and insignificant but it's not. It's at Bonita. What underpins these dreams? And these Visions in these desires, I think it's a profound recognition of our inherent worth of people. I can speak for all three of us, having known the two of you quite a while. Now and worked with you guys in the past it

one Young World and is that for people like us know, is it is almost like our favorite word because no is a challenge know is that? Yes I can know to me it's Fuel and often because I work, you know, in the social media industry hate is part and parcel. It comes along with putting yourself online for the world to to look at and so I get ocelot. How do you deal with Hayden? Negativity, and trolls and haters. And I'm like a man that doesn't bring me down. That pushes me forward. I need a fuel for my fire because you're

know you're You're no you can't you shouldn't you you aren't enough is me being like okay get ready right? That's the next on my list. Ask Polly to think about one as I want you to think about what you going to say to Business Leaders out there cuz we've got at least another eight months to close our valuable 502 unga. Or I hope you guys are going to join me back on the stage again, that's our last question but I wanted to I'm sitting here thinking we're very privileged The three of us are very privileged. We has great families.

We've had great education. And we are the lucky ones. I think the people would kick him out with us is that were inspiring which I would have stayed. We really hate rice and nobody would say who lives with us that were inspiring. We are as we're sitting here in one of the most of you know, whatever platforms of a mountain with snow in this with these great with education and family and supporters. What is a U-Boat want to see? For those who have not had the luck that we've had? What do you think is? Is it one or two

things that you could say? This is why I think this business pieces. So important, how can we help write the time for everyone? In all of our work is doing, I am not staying up at 10. We just think for a second from this place that we are so lucky to me because if I was born in the country in Africa, I would be killed because my condition so we were lucky. So can I just ask you just to speak to them just before we close enough to the business question? Yeah, absolutely. I say that. You know, the Maslow. Hierarchy of needs we we we need a kind of slip it on

his head when he does start with stop actualization and affirm. The dignity and inherent worth of people with disabilities. Everywhere.. Is just as important as advocating for a roof, over one's head, and all of the basic building blocks that constitute, the International Development space. And we need to recognize that behind all of the statistics that we throw around. 90% of children with disabilities have never seen the inside of a classroom that behind those statistics are real lives with aspirations, with hopes, which he is with anxieties with

dreams. And so, I think we need to tell those stories and we need to amplify the voices of the people that get those experiences and then my message to Business Leaders. It's a no-brainer, it's 2020 and if any CEO is really committed to Innovation and growth look no further than disability, because disability is a site of innovation and people with disabilities are incredibly talented and that is the next Frontier. That is what is required for the world to become better is to involve and include the 1.3 billion people with

disabilities, living on the planet today. Molly asked you a question from this place of very luck that we were born into. So I think to your point, that none of us like the word inspiring, We're not inspiring for living, that's what humans do we live life to the fullest. And that's what we're doing every day. And I often get comments on my videos. Wow, I couldn't, I couldn't live, if I went blind, I would just want to die. I would rather die than go blind. And I think that really speaks to the way the world is taught to view disability or tots.

If you disability at the worst possible thing in life, we'd rather die than be disabled. And I always just say, Actually. You could live like this because when life doesn't give you an option, you just do. And like, didn't give us an option. This is the hand. We were dealt. And so we're just doing it and we're playing the cards. Well, and we're doing that because like you said, Caroline, we had incredibly supportive families. We were born into the right country, the right time, the right place. I often think about the

fact that, you know, everybody's excited about how far and fast technology is moving. For our community 40 to 50 years ago we would have been taken away from our families and segregated and put in and you know homes where we do not have been given access to opportunity to education. We would have been empowered in anyway and that still happens in certain places in the world. And that's what we're fighting for. And that's what we need to see change. As I said earlier, disability, is the only minority group that anybody in this room can join at any time in their

life? So it's really of everybody's best interests to care about accessibility. And you know, I think most of us in this room have probably heard at the curb cut phenomenon, accessible design is really Universal Design, it's not just for those of us with disabilities, it's something that benefits everybody. The curb cut was designed for people in wheelchairs. Now, the curb cut is vital for all of us riding bikes pushing baby stroller. Skateboarding. Dragon or suitcases, And that's just one small example of the world thinking about

designing for us. And it's really for all of us because it's not us and them, it's us. We're all in this world together. There's one point, three billion of us and that number isn't going to go anywhere. We can't focus on curing, US changing us. We focus on embracing us as we are. You know what, we need businesses to do. It's a step up. We need an accessibility officer who is going to be empowered and supported to create change within organizations. We need organizations to commit to hiring and, including people with disabilities within their organization

and within their consumer base with who their marketing and creating products for. So this is, this is what we need two companies to step up and do this is why the valuable 500 is so important? And what they are doing that orders and as I said it is truly in everybody's best interest. Like Eddie said, disabled people are who you want in your team, we are some of those hard-working creative, ambitious, people who overcome daily who often have to think creatively and outside of the box. And if you don't want people like that on your team, I don't know who you want on your team.

Jobs woken from his nephews. Like are we done? So I just want to end with three things very quickly. We would say we all supposed to the the social model of disability, I have a 4 1/2 year old nephew. To light go on my, you know, my needs to and I hold his shoulders and I left him in the face and I say you were just good enough the Way You Are. And I want to believe. It's not a conversation about this ability, but actually the world is not designed for that sentiment. We're not the tables, we would all believe the world is

designed, so if it's the Mr, deyn of the world. So we can design that acts, so we can design the disability we have, but we can design the accommodation, we can future-proof our world, and our businesses, we can change bad habits of exclusion habits of exclusion. And I just wanted to, and by saying, next year, when it be magnificent, if we had Eddie speaking on a play, new power panel about travel on space travel and Molly. Speaking on a panel about fashion and not talking about disability but giving their experience through the disability

lens would not be progress. So I just want to say, I ain't going to tend to get you there. I want to thank everyone of you for joining us. I think of something very special about this but I don't, I have such regard and I please we're going to stick around afterwards but a huge round of applause for the world. Comic form. Thank you. Thank you again, you keep doing this with keep building on it but it is gorgeous and wonderful heart with Molly Park.

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Edward Ndopu
Molly Burke
Caroline Casey