Duration 30:53
16+
Play
Video

James Rogers, Yves Sisteron, and Walter Robb Interviewed by Aditi Maliwal | Upfront Summit 2020

James Rogers
CEO at Apeel
  • Video
  • Table of contents
  • Video
Upfront Summit 2020
January 29 2020, Pasadena, CA, United States
Upfront Summit 2020
Video
James Rogers, Yves Sisteron, and Walter Robb Interviewed by Aditi Maliwal | Upfront Summit 2020
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Add to favorites
441
I like 0
I dislike 0
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
  • Description
  • Transcript
  • Discussion

About speakers

Walter Robb is an investor, mentor and advisor to the next generation of American food companies. As former co-CEO of Whole Foods Market, Robb has a long and varied entrepreneurial history, ranging from natural food retailer to farmer to consultant. Robb joined Whole Foods Market in 1991 and in 2010 was named co-CEO along with John Mackey, at which time he joined the Whole Foods Market Board of Directors. In 2017, Robb transitioned his leadership focus to his role as a passionate advocate for greater food access in underserved communities, serving as Chairman of the Board for Whole Kids Foundation and Whole Cities Foundation. Robb also serves on the Board of Directors for Union Square Hospitality Group, The Container Store, FoodMaven, HeatGenie and Apeel Sciences.

About the talk

Topic: Business

James Rogers (Founder & CEO, Apeel Sciences), Walter Robb (Stonewall Robb Advisors & former CEO of Whole Foods), and Yves Sisteron (founder & Managing Partner of Upfront Ventures) talk with Upfront Ventures partner Aditi Maliwal about the genesis of Apeel Sciences; the benefit of Apeel to retailers and the food supplies; the coming transformation in our food supply and food systems; and the growing opportunities for environmental tech investing.

Share

Thank you for joining. Thank you. Everyone. Welcome to upfront Summit 20/20. I wanted to introduce my incredible panelist before 00:00 we begin. We have James Rogers CEO and founder of appeal Sciences. He's raised over a hundred million dollars and is currently building an incredible 00:10 company to increase the lifetime of produce on shelves Walter Robb. The former co-ceo of Whole Foods having worked his way up the ranks 00:18 in the food industry, and he's now an investor mentor and advisor to the next generation of food companies and the incredibly sisteron the founder of 00:28

upfront Ventures to just want to thank all my panelist for being here. So why did I start off this conversation with some data for people to have some 00:37 idea of what we're talking about here humans have lived in a state of mental in a mental state of abundance for quite a while and we're starting to 00:47 see the shortages just some data points. The cost of food waste globally is currently 2.6 trillion dollars annually roughly 00:55 one-third of food produced in the world for human consumption every year approximately 1.3 billion tons gets wasted or lost and at a 01:04

retail level large quantities of food are wasted due to quality standards that overemphasize appearance. At least 1.8 billion people globally 01:14 used vehicle leaking contaminated drinking water and water scarcity affects more than 40% of the world's population. So would that I'd 01:23 like to start with James. I know James that you've been on a mission to change some of parts of this conversation and I'd love to start off with 01:33 understanding. What was the impetus behind starting a peel your just come out of your Ph.D program. Let's start off their what what appeal does 01:40

And the tagline that we use is that appeal uses food to preserve food, which sounds kind of opaque or marketing. He's so what I mean by that is a peel 01:50 uses materials that are found in every bite of fruit and vegetable that you eat everyday in order to create a water base formula that we apply to the 01:59 surface of fresh produce adds a little extra peel. You can't see it. You can't taste it. You can't feel it. But it's there and it's controlling the 02:07 factors which cause produce to Aid which are basically water going out and oxygen going in and that last bit why fruit ages 02:15

at water going on oxygen you again ended up being one of the invitations for a first starting a company. I knew nothing about 02:25 the food industry. In fact when I called my mom to tell her about the idea for the company. She said sweetie, that sounds really nice. But you don't 02:34 know anything about fruits and vegetables are very true. I grew up in Michigan not not super high and fruits and veg and at night, but I had done to 02:41 it to UC Santa Barbara do my PhD in materials engineering and I was studying the solar paints and the idea was that you could mix up a bucket of paint 02:51

and you could paint the surface and let it dry and it would dry into a solar cell that you could use to charge your phone or to power light or 02:59 something. I thought that's a really cool technology to work on. I'm going to spend my years in Santa Barbara studying that but watching paint dry is 03:07 not very interesting unless you have very fancy equipment to look at it. And so I would make these trips between Santa Barbara and Lawrence Berkeley 03:16 National Lab where they have the equipment to make these experiments interesting and I one of these trips. I was listening to a podcast about how How 03:23

we were going to feed ten billion people on this planet in 30 years. I mean while we only + 7 billion + 1 + 9 people were going hungry already and I 03:32 never really thought about the issue of a people going hungry. It was just kind of one of those things, you know, the world has hunger the world has 03:42 cancer and the world has a war but I never really ask the next question why that is and it struck me because I was driving through Salinas which 03:50 is considered the salad bowl of the US. And as far as I can see in every direction where these lush green fields and all I could think to myself was 04:00

we've been provided basically these magical seeds that we put in the ground. They absorb water absorbs sunlight they produce food and they self 04:09 propagate. How is it possible that one and nine people are going hungry when we have been afforded this magic and so I looked into it and I'll spare 04:17 you all the details, but at learned that the reason that that people are going Angry is not because of their inability to produce food, but rather 04:27 their inability to take that valuable produce and a trade it for money so that they can do the back conversion from money to food when 04:36

they don't have production and that inability to trade is results of the fact that food goes bad. And so I quickly looked up that food goes bad 04:46 because water goes out and oxygen goes in and that reminded me exactly of my days at Carnegie Mellon as an undergraduate studies feel you 04:55 might not think about steel is perishable, but it reacts with oxygen in the atmosphere and it forms iron oxide which eats into the steel and limits 05:05 its utility which was Intel metallurgist figured out this clever trick that you could incorporate on certain elements, like molybdenum like chromium 05:14

like nickel. I'm into that chunk of iron and when you did that those elements would preferentially react with oxygen born this little barrier around 05:22 the outside. Which would physically block for their oxygen from reaching the surface and that was the invention of stainless steel. And so the the the 05:31 math for appeal was well, it still was going badly put a little barrier around it and that created stainless steel and people are going hungry because 05:39 food is going bad and things going bad because water is going out in oxygen is going in for a little barrier around the food that was left on the 05:49

water going out oxygen going in that would allow people to trade in that may eventually I have an impact on the hunger problem. 05:56 Eve you were the first investor in appeal and spend a lot of time with James very early on would love to hear the story of how you met 06:09 James what got you excited about this and also, you know a little bit about a friend's thesis in sustainability and how we're thinking about it. Well, 06:19 I met James about 6 years ago and I think the October 13th. If I remember correctly referred to by one of our studios in Santa Barbara 06:28

Jason speed bag Co it was at the time so you live in Boca and I 06:38 mean special 06:44 Materials Science side that lost me 06:53 going after a big problem and a problem that wasn't video 06:56 dressed then which was that you can email and let me know that we have a big issue with food supply and increasing the Food Supplies and then with 07:06 population in the next decades and and that's probably one of the greatest chance of our times really and and James are pushing it from an angle that 07:15

no one really had approached which is to reduce waste. Supposed to increasing the supply or the production know the efficiency the productivity 07:24 big idea. I mean the other thing that and that first meeting is that he had these little cameras that you are 07:32 3D printed I think of at the time and they were time lapse go to videos where you could look at strawberries trending on Twitter 07:42 strawberries in the results, and it was pretty clear that after whatever it was two or three weeks time the treated strawberries. We're 07:51

looking brand new land and that's what the others were struggling in and all that so that that was pretty impressive and the time we 08:01 sensually participant Misty Smoke Shack and I'm ready. I spend time with James after that. I think it came once a month or so to meet with you 08:11 and spend the afternoon that small office that you had with three people and and it was 3D during that time about productizing 08:21 You know what you are doing so that we could get ready-to to commercialize it but more importantly to me. It was fine, James and I frankly I'm not so 08:31

busy seeing audience and I will know that okay, you can want to change the world have a great solution to an enormous problem because I don't think 08:40 you can really make a difference without the solid science behind it and you want the founder and co-founder that 08:50 can pull it off and the end up with you to spend maybe a year with you at the time and I get to know him and you know, I think I I 09:00 don't want embarrass you but to having sort of a combination of other scientists that p a t matter science from UCSB, which is probably the best 09:10

program in the world for one of the three best I think and and being able to You know your company 09:18 hire people 09:26 probably that to have this sucks 09:28 Sports background as well as it's nice when I mean you were a captain of the football team in high school and college so that the competitive nature 09:38 and that's what convinced us to then lead the series a year later on and we've been doing that ever since and 09:47 certainly not disappointed with that and I'll obviously Walter you're actually a board member at appeal as well and have been involved with the 09:57

company for a while now and you obviously have the perspective built from the retailer side of thing. And then also as a consumer would love to get 10:06 your perspective and sort of what you're seeing in the market and what your understanding from the retailer side is of what how they would react to 10:14 appeal and how would consumers view this as well? Good morning, everybody. I think they're really amazing thing about what James has done here in and 10:21 kudos to you for support in 5 years ago. Is that for the last seventy years in America when the world really we would really been going to be 10:29

industrialized agriculture the modernization of Agriculture the major production protocols that have his kind of build our food system. And what's 10:37 happening here now is a pivot where we're seeing that the real feel is this a week. We're going to work with nature. There's a lot of there's a lot of 10:46 wisdom and knowledge in nature that we can now tap to build the next generation of food and Food Systems at whether it will you come out of print it 10:54 in food system touch every major problem on the plan on whether its climate whether it's Health where there's any are you go food the food system 11:01

which represents about 18% of the GDP is touching it in some very real way to Ulta beauty app for me when I found James and met James and we talked as 11:09 the philosophical alignment the philosophical thought that we can think about Charlotte a very big problem. Which food waste is How to waste like on 11:18 the Whole Foods salad bar for not talking about that. We're most of the Lost food is in the production system the mismatch between supply and demand 11:26 were you know, literally it'll be two hundred million pounds of chicken breast that have no place to go until they don't want to take the brand down. 11:34

So we're talking about massive amounts of food and I would say the number in the u.s. Is probably North at 40% vs to 30% So here you come James taking 11:41 on a very big problem, but with a philosophical orientation that I think is right for the X in terms of being responsible. So imma see the benefits 11:50 are pretty clear as a grocer when things are you worried about his shrink the term of art for the food that goes bad we've all had that experience we 12:00 go to the produce stand stick a finger to the avocado. That's not the one for us. But what is the grocery Grocery has to do something with it. So it 12:08

helps us on the supply side to manage our inventory 2 minute to make it more manageable in terms of sequencing it up for the customer it gives them to 12:16 thing. One I think the the since they're buying a product that's going to last a little longer. They go away for the weekend. Then come back is still 12:25 going to be there. But increasing I think of the appeal brand get some consumer recognition for what it stands for. It is organic. It is safe. It's 12:31 essentially essentially takes the lipids out of a p love and then puts it back on top of the food. It's just it's as simple as that and not as simple 12:40

as that, but the customer a brand that says you can you can pick up so you can make a choice of a citrus or an asparagus or an avocado. It's going to 12:48 have these benefits When you take it home and it's going to last so I see benefits of overall food system the potential just really starting to be 12:57 realized benefits to the grocer at all the way to the supply chain and then also to the customer as well. I see James you're working with 13:05 retailers. So and you're working with Grocers, like could you share some sort of antidotes or anything anything that you are comfortable sharing in 13:15

terms of their reactions and sort of What were their accent when you first talked to them and what have been reactions today instead of seeing the 13:22 development of product the First Reactions were why are you here? You know, why is why is it technology provider 13:30 for our suppliers and sitting out in our office isn't telling us about a technology that our suppliers are going to be using and that took me by 13:40 surprise that that no one had had sat down and discussed this with the Retailer's before until kind of had the recognition that you're most of the 13:50

tricks that we had been using in the food system with things people did not want to talk about they were things like pocket plastic packaging their 13:58 things like that actually were the grossest preferred that those things were may be invisible to them. And so when 14:06 we sat down and explained that we had started this company on the foundation that if you put a strawberry on the table and you wait for 3 days Can you 14:16 put a lemon on the table and you wait for three days the strawberry melt into a puddle in 3 days, but the lemon still going for a month and that we 14:25

had you gotten together and thought well, they're both food. Why is it that the one that the lemon last 4 months in the strawberry melt into a puddle 14:33 and it didn't take it didn't take a genius to say well, maybe there's something about the peel of the lemon That's Unique or special relative to the 14:42 peel of the strawberry. And so that we have gotten a company together and we begin looking at this and saying well maybe the molecules that compose 14:52 that the peel of the women are different than the molecules that compose if he held the strawberry and we zoomed in and we were shocked to find out 15:01

that the molecules are identical there been in retrospect maybe shouldn't have been surprised because nature is clever a tree using materials do we 15:10 scratch their heads in and thought well Okay, let's ask the question material scientist. Might might ask which is maybe the molecules are arranged 15:19 differently on the surface of the lemon relative to the surface of the strawberry. And if that's the case, then we can learn from the lemon and we can 15:27 teach that to the strawberry using exactly the same materials and if we do that were using food to preserve food, which is something philosophically 15:36

that we think is worth building and something that we should be communicating to your Shoppers because it's in it's an opportunity for them to a 15:44 purchase something with which is better tasting longer lasting more nutritious lower-cost and available without without Cam 15:53 and that idea that that actually that the the post-harvest elements of production had a 16:02 huge impact on the overall marketable quality of what they were able to carry in their stores and what what it would mean for reduce waste in 16:12

inventory management. Never been never been approached with something like that before because it wasn't something that really wanted to be 16:19 talked about. And so that we we had we find ourselves a blazing new territory. Zooming out a little bit and Walter, 16:29 actually you and I talked a little bit about this earlier, which was great to hear. What are other choices out there for customers to make around 16:39 food, like what are some of the options people can be what are better options people can be making what are more sustainable options people can be 16:46

making and especially for audience today to hear your perspective on that import of our potential part of James's work with just think about 16:53 all those places in the world where fresh food is not distributed of the distribution network is not yet built out inner cities of America that are 17:03 underserved on fresh fruits and vegetables even social crisis situations or manager in crisis situations where this could be a help to something like 17:11 that all that to be realized in the future. But but we're on a new food Revolution It's Beginning now, I could have given you some of the thoughts my 17:19

thoughts on the philosophical underpinning for that but realizing the limits of of large-scale production and and single-use. Chemicals, there are 17:29 some there's a there's an alternative production system that's evolving side-by-side. No disrespect there cuz we're that we have the most productive 17:38 agriculture in the world. But we have also very vibrant alternative agriculture structure that says by the show. The big thing is the plant-based 17:45 right plant-based Whole Food plant-based is growth as far as the eye can see and the capital markets seem to have woken up to all these various things 17:53

examples of indoor agriculture, which will which is a fairly small part of the total food supply right now is growing rapidly weather that says 18:01 soil-based water-based or air base all sorts of Technologies in companies out there. Bring those alternatives to Market primarily and greens, but 18:09 going to be spreading each other right? If you have course the plant-based Meats, you've all seen the Phenom of Beyond need an impossible Foods. 18:17 That's only the tip of the iceberg. And by the way, the demand for those products is globally and it's led by flexitarians not by vegans and 18:24

vegetarians is by those who just want to eat a little less meat are concerned about the impact on climate. There's cellular-based meet which will be 18:31 coming to Market in less than 2 years where the the scientist has bypass. The animal is sent to be taken the protein from the animal and reproducing 18:39 it you have on the organic side. You got regenerative organic. You have so much science happening on soil soil biomes. We needed it the Google and 18:47 Google for example is deeply involved in in the analytics around soil and Agriculture and tell you later about some of the companies. I think you're 18:56

really cool. But the fact is you've got this whole new opening up a variety of foods that just don't we get about 80% or 85% of our calories from 19:05 five animals at 12:12 to call plants and we are tap lifting .1% of the plant University out there right now the 19:15 next 50 years looks like an exploding riding in a lot of the momentum in the food market place has shifted to the small and medium-sized companies who 19:25 are able to innovate and bring some of these new products to Market. Absolutely, and I know that obviously you've been thinking about this for a long 19:34

time. Are there other Investments that you're making in the food spay or is it around sustainability for therapy food Weatherby water weathered beat 19:42 bugs find 19:51 solution to these big challenges around food supply water may be just the next time but I think water is taking care of Innocence 20:01 my companies Like a Pill by reducing waist reducing water consumption of the same time. So every everything is linked and you every company 20:11 noodle fact that system. But yeah, so put some vegetables to naturally in the year and then and end with with a 20:21

pill I think we're addressing a big issue in reducing weight protein other than Walter just mentioned about new so cell-based 20:30 proteins are the things of that nature is also a big issues around at the oceans and about this is anybody what we do in terms of 20:40 fish are close to 50% of the fish farms in terms of consumer spending 20:50 those Fish Farms generally do something that's very unsustainable. Essentially. They feed fish with fish and empty the oceans to do it. 21:00

So we just send some of you yesterday to not the presentation about we invested in the company that reads insects 21:09 mealworms for eyebrow mean carnivores. 21:18 Enormous, I'm in the fish feed in the world is 44 million pounds to tons a year. And you know, 21:31 it's true for anyone in the audience is you you want to buy things that can read tip the scale and solve a global 21:40 issue until the skill and that's what it feel does and we'll do in Spades in the future and it's hard to find companies that already have can offer 21:50

something systematic that kind to her friend and the insect is it one of those, you know, we've all we ought 21:58 to see everyone has a point of view on the food system. Everyone is talking about this but alluded to this which is how do you increase accessibility 22:08 and there is aside from the fact that today there's obviously Foods on shelves price comes into it play here, right? How 22:17 do we think about the fact that there is food on shelves? And some of this some of these methodologies do required 22:27

packing that Pride pack. In fact that into the price James about this and I'm sure that would be great to hear more. 22:36 This is one of those areas where waste impacts every single person in the in the supply chain and very significantly the 22:46 Indian consumer today. We have a very non-participatory food system in the sense that that you are either a major producer 22:56 that has a refrigerated supply chain to a major consumption region and you got you got refrigerate distribution 23:05

or you don't have access to that because the only tool that we had available to us in terms of fresh produce has been 23:15 cold storage. It's required very significant investment in establishing the This cold chain infrastructure, which does allow it to 23:24 reduce waste in the supply chain, but because it requires such a significant investment, there are people in the planet that don't have access to the 23:34 Refrigerant Supply Chain either on the input side meaning the production. They can't get it to where it needs to get to to be exported or on the 23:42

consumption side is not a Refrigerant Supply Chain to the stores where they live and so we see a future where I'm by 23:49 reducing perishability. You actually are creating a more participatory food system where small Growers and because of this reduced perishability have 23:59 the ability to connect that intrinsically valuable natural resource that they have access to into a market that is willing to pay 24:09 for that intrinsically valuable piece of food, which nearby by no fault of their own today at not able to establish on that connection. 24:19

And so that When you don't have that connection that resulted in a people going hungry on the production side, but at the same time 24:29 the food that does make it through the supply chain. There's so much weight in that distribution because of again though the lack of refrigerant 24:38 infrastructure that it contributes to the large amount of waste and you know, people are saying we only know we only bought a hundred 24:47 avocado zweilous old lady, but we're only going to charge for the price of the 80 avocados after Coupe that that full cost. And so that additional 24:57

cost of waste is baked into the price that consumers pay and so I'm really proud of the fact that our apartment are able to pay a pill 25:04 at 2 to install our product and then it ends up paying less because we're able to take so much waste out of the supply chain and I think as we 25:14 continue on to remove waste from the supply chains going to continue to pull cost down down down until we not only have food that Get everywhere 25:23 because it is able to make it there but also is so low waist that the cost is lower the kids because he would lie be 25:32

obviously everyone we have a perspective on what the food altering sort of referred to what the food 25:38 system looks like and today and sort of what are some of the things that said we should be spending time in or sort of action. We should be taking 25:48 what does our food system look like in 50 years from now briefly touched it upon it and I would love to hear that and some of the features some of the 25:55 key features of that food system my missional you got you got kind of two parallel foodsystems in Beth will be out in a little bit and she's a 26:04

tremendous leader and innovator in the larger scale agriculture the cheese company that she leads fit for one of the be a far more diverse the foods 26:11 that we eat. We'll be far more diverse. There's there's there's there's clearly a whole new range of foods are going to be her dish to the world from 26:19 different sources if you want to go a newer switch North Report of the top new 50 foods every year to Great read in terms of where some of these 26:26 products may be coming from one example is when the LEM and a headset aquatic green. It's got Superior protein. So the company developing that now so 26:35

it's going to be far more flavorful. So we have primarily been did the seed industry is primarily bread for productivity or for 26:44 packaging with the customer say now, I'm really interested how it taste in the flavor included a wonderful pleasurable experience, right? And so you 26:54 have some Seed Company starting up you have some companies that are hiring flavor people singing from the ingredient industry and putting together an 27:02 attempt to bring products on intend on Flavor settings more. I think it's connected with them with their help. Another words were going to have to 27:10

enter what's happening is food will become medicine will be not disrupt Natalie the healthcare model but also will have disrupted kind of the 27:17 Year personalized path to help you want a lot. How's your health you use food that's been augmented by some of these things are being discovered a 27:27 company. I would call out to you that I think is fantastic is brightseat out of San Francisco. These scientists are basically created the computer AI 27:35 tool to uncover and connect in a molecules in the peanut world with with a chronic disease and talk about without modification of any sort by just 27:44

three amplification. They're going to bring these phytonutrients. What's a 3X phytonutrient broccoli at to you and you'll be able to make that choice. 27:54 So these will be brought together the full potential food will be realized Healthcare will be turned on its head every individual have tools and 28:01 platforms be able to accept that where they do or not. That's that's the choice don't have to make but it will be also far more transparent. So you'll 28:10 be able to go to the store and the stores will still be in the future by the way, despite all the digital growth people still are human beings and 28:18

they like the connection but the tools to be able to be in to inform yourself. I swear something is growing how it's grown. Although certain qualities 28:27 that will be all readily available. So and it'll be fast rather be past. The digital thing will be fully realized an integrated with the physical. 28:34 Thank you. I appreciate that. And so I think I have time for one more question and even going to ask you is we've talked a lot about sort of the 28:42 biggest challenges facing water protection today. And I think that you sort of alluded to it at some point and I'd love to get just a couple of 28:51

thoughts. Or I go through water is 28:58 needed for a protein Supply water is needed on one side to get the ocean that weather water quality is certainly diminishing and 29:08 probably did we see a future of land-based operations 29:17 because of the water quality their water. It also is as a diamond said yesterday is 29:26 very Geographic him in there some places like China that has 20% of world population that 5% of the water some other places that have a lot of water 29:36 lies Canada another see if oldies on even surprised also climate change was going to impact at and shipped in a region and so 29:45

it sounds think you look at California or Spain. There are two is so The Gardens of Europe and United States and I mean James, 29:55 you know that way Little kids south of Spain day seems like only green houses from the sky is Hilo all of that and why is that is because it's drying 30:05 out and didn't have water and in California, we know where that water issues soap adjusting to that. So, you know, maybe you know, how much is a great 30:14 but at the same time they're super Port of dependence. So we're going to have to adjust our Productions and geographies to 30:23

adapt to the water issues momentarily been changing the water because that's a hard thing to do 30:32 really appreciate it and big round of applause for our panel. 30:38

Cackle comments for the website

Buy this talk

Access to the talk “James Rogers, Yves Sisteron, and Walter Robb Interviewed by Aditi Maliwal | Upfront Summit 2020”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Video

Get access to all videos “Upfront Summit 2020”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Ticket

Interested in topic “Business”?

You might be interested in videos from this event

March 6 2020
New York, NY
5
7
commercial, cretech, data, investment strategies, projects, property, proptech, real estate, real estate technologies, technology, womeninproptech, womeninproptech summit

Similar talks

Al Saltie
Senior Vice President at AutoZone
Gordon Henry
CMO at Thryv
Scott Griffiths
CFO, Marketing at Farmers Insurance
Marisa Thalberg
Chief Brand Officer at Yum! Brands
Brian Braiker
Editor at AdAge
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Oby Ezekwesili
Richard von Weizacker Fellow at Robert Bosch Academy
Maryanne Akoth
Director for programs at ISBI @ Strathmore Business School
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Kai-Fu Lee
Chairman and CEO at Sinovation Ventures
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Buy this video

Video

Access to the talk “James Rogers, Yves Sisteron, and Walter Robb Interviewed by Aditi Maliwal | Upfront Summit 2020”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Conference Cast

With ConferenceCast.tv, you get access to our library of the world's best conference talks.

Conference Cast
505 conferences
19653 speakers
7164 hours of content