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Citrix Synergy TV - SYN126 - How Vector launches rockets with Citrix Workspace

Bob Ball
Principal Software Engineer at Citrix
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Citrix Synergy Atlanta 2019
May 22 2019, Atlanta, GA, United States
Citrix Synergy Atlanta 2019
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Citrix Synergy TV - SYN126 - How Vector launches rockets with Citrix Workspace
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About speakers

  • Bob Ball
    Principal Software Engineer at Citrix
  • John Metzger
    Co-Founder / Head of Engineering at NewSpace Networks

About the talk

Topic: IT

And you thought running workloads in the cloud could be tricky. Join this session to see how Citrix customer Vector uses Citrix Virtual Apps and Desktops to remotely manage rocket launches. You'll also hear about how they are creating Galactic Sky, a satellite-based cloud based on Citrix Hypervisor, and the challenges of working in space. Gain an understanding of the latest Citrix product features that enable Vector to achieve this, and their plans for Citrix Workspace. This session will truly be "out of this world"!Note: This session will be available for on-demand viewing post-event on Citrix Synergy TV.

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Introducing a minute to John Locke's before we start if there's anything you want to tweet about this presentation 00:03 hashtags Citrix Synergy Citrix is Highway access space. Also mention the vector Space Systems Twitter handle 00:13 so over to John Metzger who's VP of software engineering? Good morning, everyone welcome. 00:22 My name is John Metzger is Bob said I'm responsible for a galactic Sky, which is Special Operation biometric rating 00:31 for satellites and so we can talk a little about that today first. Let me give you a little bit about Vector our mission. Basically we can kind of a 00:41

two prong Mission at the space access company. Our mission is to transform the space economy through at any time anywhere launch facility as well as a 00:48 space grade Computing platform to significant lower the barriers of Entry to space. What does all that mean basically most of you were familiar today 00:56 with big Rockets. You've seen launches a go to International Space Station, you might even seen SpaceX rocket launches just to give you some 01:06 perspective of those Rockets are about 250 ft tall mainly are used to put people into space but some of the SpaceX Rockets have also been handling 01:15

payloads those payloads in the past about the size of school buses must have satellites that exist in space in the last 30 40 years are very very 01:23 large. They're very high in orbit there about 23,000 miles up in space. That's because at that orbit, they basically are 01:33 essentially stationary as it relates to a point on Earth. They're rotating effectively the same speed as the rotation of the Earth. The new 01:42 space-age just completely different and we're going to talk about that today. I'm really here to talk about house district is partnering with us in 01:52

Vector to really bring this new space-age to fruition where to talk about new space-age satellites. This is not a real satellite obviously, but this 02:00 is a idea exactly the size of new satellites these satellites rather than going up 23,000 miles in space. So they wonder why they call low earth orbit 02:10 low earth orbit about 300 miles above Earth. Satellites can be as small as in the Datacenter. They have something called A1 you and Iraq 02:19 and to you satellites in the new age are called cubesats for Microsoft lights. They are called cube satellites because there are the smallest ones are 02:29

Cube little about 3 and 1/4 by 3 and 1/4. This would be a 3 Cube satellite. So a lot of them are in the range of 3 Cube 12 two things like that, 12 / 02:37 12 you and satellites to effectively 12 cubed. 02:47 This will give you a real idea of exactly how the whole process work. This is actually stimulation the reason simulation again, so we can see what 02:57 happens to out the whole launch activity. 03:03 I thought. So if you were. If you are not fully awake when you came in the room, you're probably awake. Now. That's the exciting 04:52

part about launching Rockets. Basically when you get to the day when you send something in space that actually works than this in the satellite gets 05:02 deployed in it comes to life but there's a lot before that we don't talk about quickly is the differentiation of what you saw here basis basically 05:09 how it differs from what you're familiar with you with big Rockets like our ideas anytime anywhere lunch. UCR Rockets are about 50 feet tall. The 05:17 objective is we actually launched him off at El we can launch my anywhere. We don't need a big Spaceport a big space pad. We don't have to spend three 05:27

months in preparation at somewhere like a Cape Canaveral we can launch from those sites, but we don't need a side like that and like I said that the 05:33 Rockets much smaller. a typical SpaceX rocket cost about three hundred million dollars The payloads on those Rockets those big satellites. I talked 05:41 about are equally in the hundreds of millions of dollars. These Rockets are in the range of 2 to 5 million. We have a couple of different size 05:50 Rockets. But again much smaller 50 ft taller. So any satellites again, even though they're much smaller are again in the scale of things about 2 05:56

million dollars to create but the game you can see the scale. Is it significantly different than the big rockets? And these things are used. So we can 06:05 talk about some aspects of what it takes to launch. One of the things the first takes place as we spend a lot of time testing. We have a side out in 06:14 Arizona, Arizona test site. The middle of the desert. Bass guitar looks like there's not much out there. These are tested take place over months and 06:22 months. We burn rocket engines we do test that lasts. Maybe one second a burn we burn up a lot of tests Vehicles. We test fuel loading time to take 06:32

the load of fuel things like that. So a lot of time and effort spent out in that location. But we don't want to send all of our Engineers out to those 06:41 locations every day for test for months and months at a time. It's very inhospitable to begin with so they really don't want to be there. We are lunch 06:50 with lots of different places. You'll see some commonality here. Most of lunch spots are on the coast to the east coast to the West Coast. That's 07:00 because Jenna Leah launch rockets over water don't want to watch him into the habit of inhabited areas where something to go wrong and you can do some 07:06

damage but most of our sites are in again places that aren't very friendly. We have a launch up in Kodiak Alaska 07:16 coming up later this year on fortunately tends to hit often wore in the winter than it does in the summer is not a great place to be in the winter 07:26 there actually Bears roaming around on the launch site. This is actually launch site here in Georgia to the very Southeastern corner of 07:33 Georgia out of the coast about 500 miles from here. This is a lunch we did about 2 and 1/2 years ago. Again, there's nothing out there. That's not a 07:42

place where a lot of people want to be. It's full of bugs. It's full of alligators. It's full of wild boar. There's more animals than people in this 07:52 location. This is a real rocket launch that took place. Like I said about 2 and 1/2 years ago have one of our Rockets. This was actually a suborbital 07:59 launch didn't go all the way into orbit but gives you a chance to see a real real rocket go up in space. So this is captured with a drone. 08:06 But again, you can see most of these places that we launched from because we can watch when I realized from a towel as opposed to a big platform. 08:19

This is what it mainly looks like out at the site. We typically don't have major internet connectivity. We are either using a microwave or satellites 08:31 or in some cases. There may be a cell tower nearby. But Communications are somewhat Limited. We usually have space for one or two people in these 08:39 little Communications trailers. This is what we call her our launch command and control again. It takes about 50 people to launch a rocket. We don't 08:48 want to send all 50 people out there. The real activity the real action takes place in our missions Operation Center or control center back in 08:58

Huntington Beach. This is where are the majority of our Engineers are all able to watch the activities monitor things as you can imagine their 09:07 millions of the things that we have to monitor on the on the Rockets from fuel levels to heat temperature sensor is all kinds of things. These people 09:14 are or watching all kinds of various Telemetry data and information. So Citrix is really the one that post this all together and makes it work through 09:24 the porch relaxing to Virtual desktops were able to remote all this information from those remote launch sites back to remission control centers. We 09:33

talked about again allows us to send a few people as possible to these locations where they don't really want to be anywhere anyway by staying at the 09:41 home office. They have access to the engineers tools other people other needs that they might need to help when there's a problem to be solved. I got 09:48 that mentions off in the communication capabilities of these sites is quite limited its highlight and see if it's going over satellite length. It's 09:56 also low-bandwidth. So by using the remote access products of Citrix, we can compress that content down. We're sending typically many video feeds as 10:03

well as data feeds and streams from those remote locations back to the home office Citrix does a great job of utilizing that band with much more 10:12 effectively. And while it may seem somewhat mineral the security aspect is quite relevant in in very important. We in the rocket and space business 10:20 have to be extremely secure. We're not allowed to get this information in a way that somebody could from a foreign government get access to 10:30 information about our Rockets. They're basically considered missiles are considered weapons. And so were controlled by a security standard call detar 10:40

International treaty in arms regulation. And so we are required to do everything that we communicate from any spots using the tips certified 10:47 algorithms and against provide that for herself and result tying it all together at the bottom is basically maximum efficiency at the lowest cost by 10:56 using the Citrus products, though. Let's move the second part of our mission I talked about which is not only providing low-cost rockets and then 11:05 launch vehicles to get the satellites of our own and other people's in the space, but building your own satellites and to do so, we're actually 11:13

bringing a lot of new things into space again with the help of Citrix virtualization. This little satellite that's depicted here is something we plan 11:20 to build next year. It's about the equivalent of a 12 you so about four of these side-by-side you can see the solar panel on that one's a retractable 11:28 solar panel much different than the one we saw in the video where the solar panels were on the sides of the satellite and this is so we can generate 11:38 far more power. We'll talk about that in a minute. Challenges of space nothing like we have to deal with on Earth nothing like dealing with Restoril 11:45

data centers. We have very limited power as you can imagine the power that we have available to us. That's only what we can generate through solar 11:53 panels. And this is somewhere in the order of 10 200 watt depending again on a type of solar panels whether it's this side mounted or whether it's 12:01 something like this. These are probably about 30 Watts. That'll be generated by the solar panels. We have periods when we have no power available to 12:08 us all because we're in the eclipse phase you can think about the satellite orbiting the Earth sunless days when we're actually in in the sun in the 12:15

eclipse phase we're out of the sun with no power generation of that. Of time. So we're relying on a small storage battery. So whatever capacity that 12:22 battery can generate is all we have available to us. temperature variation Lower thortex satellite rotate serious about once every 90 minutes 12:29 goes from that sunlit face that Eclipse phase in about 45 minutes goes to my temperature range of 123 degrees Celsius to minus 170. 12:39 That's a pretty major Swingin temperature in a very short. Of time. We have to deal with in space. So think about putting this in a very 12:48

compact shielded environments with all that heat that might be generated in there and then worrying about that temperature fluctuation. There are 12:58 points in time or we actually have to cool it and fight. Sometimes we have to really worry about how we heat it up put heaters in there to make sure 13:04 when it's on the cold side that the the hardware doesn't freeze up. Solar flares these are cosmic rays radiation the high-energy particles that exist 13:12 in space. They can hit one of these things that anytime they have the force in some cases of a tennis ball traveling at 50 miles an hour is a very 13:21

high electrical charge associated with them. They can penetrate through even though he's so heavily shielded container to put in place causing a major 13:30 number of things if you can think about a high-energy electron much like a power surge happening in the Datacenter of a sudden your memory gets his 13:39 huge surge of power. What's going to happen. You're going to get the memory falsely might even get the whole process or take it out. So there's lots 13:46 of things that can happen these things because they're also hit with such an impact sometimes can really affect the drag and reduce the satellites 13:55

Lifetime and hit a solar panel and actually wipe off. Here are some of your capacity to generate power the solar panels typically in a lifetime of 14:02 satellite, which is about five to seven years decrease from 100% utilization to about 25% So you have to consider the worst-case scenario at the end 14:12 of life when they're about 25% effective. the number dealing with very infrequent connectivity If you can think about the fact again, it's rotating 14:21 around the earth that comes over a ground station once every 90 minutes to actually download whatever data is that it's captured. But even when it's 14:30

over a ground station that capacity that band with this something if you are old enough to remember dial-up modems, these are 14:38 38.4 kilobits per second type of speeds. Some of these may be in the low megabits. But again, the bandwidth is extremely extremely limited stuff. 14:47 We're faced with a lot of challenges in space. Oh, I should note that satellite that you see on that slide. Is a satellite that we're 14:56 planning to launch in October. That's our first test satellite that'll be the first actual experimentation of the things were going to talk about 15:06

today. It's something that we did in conjunction with the USC. It was a satellite that was developed by the university that actually created two of 15:14 these one that flew about 10 years ago one that was never put in space. So we've added the galactic Sky capability on the satellite and we will fly 15:21 It's Not Over. That's a good about the size of what I showed you earlier. Okay, existing 15:28 satellite architectures because of all the challenge that I just just talked about have been very limited. They're very custom-built. That's why they 15:38

are so expensive there. Obviously one off every time they build one the hardware and software as I stated are based on standards are too many many 15:45 years old. And again, the reason for that is if they work there were things that were deployed with the early NASA launches. They understand what what 15:53 were escalators continues if it's not broken don't fix it kind of concept. But again, it doesn't Advance things into the new world of technology. They 16:00 don't make use of, components single Mission. They're typically specifically told her to do just what they're going to do this laptop. You can't 16:08

change the mission to can't change what they do to can't change the software once they're sent into space. Again, you don't have very high processing 16:15 power. There aren't a lot of things available to put in space that have been what they call Rad hard in those two particles. I talked about take 16:23 special kind of Hardware to put in space to make sure that there are less susceptible to those impact. And so today the majority of processing is done 16:32 in the ground. They collect the data they get over ground station a dump as much days until the next door. But when I do the same and again at their 16:41

mansion very low bandwidth, so it's kind of a bit of a catch-22. I'm collecting all the state. I can't do much with it and space. I've got to get it 16:47 all down to the ground when I got low bandwidth. So everything's kind of working against me as they talk about their single Mission vehicles are 16:54 generally classified as either government or commercial. There's no satellites that exist in space today that can do both. 17:00 12 Factor doing we're actually bringing the concepts of terrestrial cloud-based Data Center paradigms and us-based were using virtualization. 17:10

Putting standard x86 processors in space with significant loss of memory and up to a terabyte of disk drive. We're actually creating in this 17:19 3u box here 3 processor systems of that magnitude so that we can deal with the second aspect here, which is high availability 17:29 High redundancy. Again, we talked about all those other conditions the things that make it very difficult to operate in Space by having three 17:38 processing units in that satellite. We can ensure we have a method for redundancy and rolling over. We're creating a layer of services on top of 17:45

microservices were creating hyper-converged resources shared and pooled resources across the boards in the processing units within the satellite but 17:54 equally across satellites in a constellation of constellation. Our cluster satellites are satellites are put in the same orbit in Earth that can 18:03 actually communicate with one another again today. No pic no satellites communicate with one another the new space-age is a lot of newer side lights 18:11 going out but actually have the ability to communicate across satellites. You probably heard of one way. I've been SpaceX in some of these other 18:19

companies are putting up communication mesh infrastructures in space. Those satellites are also communicate with one. Another is not actually a very 18:25 big problem. There's no air in between the relief impact the band with you can get a hundred megabit between a satellite Oregon going to ground your 18:34 dealing with atmospheric conditions in a much different radio frequency problems. And then like I talked about bringing virtualization into space. 18:41 Single a multi-tenant architecture stability to do some of those so I multi-mission capabilities were containerizing the application again, just like 18:50

you're doing in modern data centers with orchestration layers on a scale out in space. 18:57 The talk about Mom multi-mission capability uploading new payloads on the fly actually changing the concept of what the satellite might might be able 19:09 to do maybe over one region of Earth over the ocean where tracking us a ship that maybe we were over ground. We're taking pictures again. It will 19:17 depend upon what the sensors are there available on a given satellite. But if I have sensors there I can upload application to take existing take 19:23

advantage of those existing resources. I can fix bugs like an improvement. I can do things that again no satellites do today. I can really make 19:31 optimal use of the resources. I can utilize spare capacity to do different things on different satellites if I want. In terms of the 19:40 problems we talked about about State I can monitor States. I can recover very frequently. If I need to I can do that all autonomously on board 19:50 or I can send updated fixes or or new new payloads when I get over a ground station, or I can actually do something like a pixie boot if you know what 19:59

that is from a constellation satellites as my peers satellite things like that are again Concepts that are are are not even thought about today. It's 20:09 so I can clear those faults those system fausto's memory false those things. I can do by taking frequent snapshot in rolling back to the last good 20:18 known operational stage very quickly. It has commissioned availability. This is something that again if you have a Geo satellite has 20:27 basically positioned above the Earth in a fairly stationary concept if I'm trying to look at a particular object of interest on Earth. It's staying in 20:37

the same per view all the time. The Earth is rotating the satellites moving in the same Pace. It's still within my purview all the time. But if I 20:45 forgot these satellites in low-earth orbit that are moving very quickly around the earth and I'm trying to watch a particular spot on earth. I'm going 20:52 to quickly move out of the ability to watch that thing. So what would be ideal as I passed that application workloads to the next satellite that's 20:58 coming into the purview of that object of Interest. I call that persistent surveillance again using a ring of satellites in the same orbit in Earth. 21:06

And so I'm going to be able to use the concept of Zen motion of moving of complete application workload from one satellite to the next satellite 21:16 that's coming over that object. I can transfer all the states sensor data all the tracking information. I need to effectively it looks like it's 21:25 staying on a single satellite, but it's really not. Real-time Advanced processing I mentioned earlier. They really don't do much processing in 21:33 space today. It's really collection of data and sending it down. We envisioned the fact it in most cases what you really don't want is all that day 21:43

that what you really want to see results. You want to get to some actual information. For example, if I'm tracking Cargo in in Planes 21:51 Cargo in the trucks going across the nation, I'm really looking at the sensors that tell me the temperature of those trucks not really 22:00 interested in this. I've got perishable Goods. I'm hauling in the temperature gets too warm. I didn't know that freely immediately. Give me to go to 22:09 stand all that information down about all the trucks and tracking when I really only care about the anomalies only care about the ones that are out of 22:16

the temperature range that's of Interest. So we believe heavily in the fact that processing in space makes a lot of sense. Here's an example of 22:22 imagery processing where maybe they have three different types of camera. On my satellite. I'm regular camera. I have something that's called a star 22:29 imagery think it's more like an X-ray camera. I could do something like a create a composite image in space and send down one and it's kind of like a 22:38 multi-layered photo as opposed to sending the three individual ones as you can imagine imagery is quite large costing. 22:46

Pictures you've taken they can be especially if you got high resolution quite quite a beta bites and so you don't want to spend any more than you have 22:55 to if I could collapse this together, or I can in a lot of cases what happens with imagery satellites up going around the earth a lot of pictures. I'm 23:03 taking get nothing but clouds. I really don't care about those pictures. I'll coming down to earth. It's a waste of time to transmit all that day. So 23:10 if I processed and do some kind of filtering and look at those images for advantageous using my bandwidth coming to Earth. Anakin virtualization 23:18

allows us to run multiple processes and do these kinds of things in space and the virtualization solution 23:27 addresses mangoes shortfalls I can do as I sat multi-mission capability. I can do the rapid recovery by taking snapshots of frequent intervals. I 23:37 enhance my mission availability. I can send out new payloads new work clothes new things over time. I can put my play tennis on there. I can actually 23:45 have a sensor collecting data and I can feed that data to through or three different applications simultaneously that might want to do different 23:53

things with it create different outcomes different action. I can take advantage of other real-time Advanced processing I can use security and 23:59 environmental isolation. If you think about the fact of a VM, I go to VM and the reason I do that is if it crashes were impacts my system affect the 24:07 application running an inn in another VM. And I've got rapid scalability feeling down. So again virtualization with a citrus 24:15 hypervisor solves a lot of those problems that exist in space today. Sodium hypervisor key features were taking advantage of Life snap shots 24:25

will be Snapchatting very very frequently. So again, if it get hit with one of those major protons or or some kind of particle in space will just 24:35 migrate that workload. Use the next element are VM migration to the next processor system in the same satellite. Oregon will even move it to a 24:42 satellite adjacent to us to the space. Again, we can use the life patching features. We can do automatic Health checking 24:51 proactive identify issues and Notifier mission control people of what's going on in space. Again, we can take advantage of the operational security 25:00

isolation between virtual machines creating strong boundaries again allows this even turn out to do missions where we have government applications 25:09 which again they don't like typically running on the same satellite with a commercial application but using virtual machines, we can guarantee them 25:16 the isolation that ensures that there's no ability for their data to be compromised. Oh and we can create Crossroads private Network. So again for 25:23 migrating workloads across satellite sending State information so we can ensure that those are on private networks that again or not accessible to 25:31

other VMS or other application running on the satellites and will take advantage of this an API API that gives us the full open source tools tools 25:38 stock to take advantage of others and features. Why do people ask? What kind of things do people actually really do 25:46 on satellites that again most people are pretty familiar with the satellites exist in space today Who provided our GPS coordinates a lot of people 25:56 maybe you're probably with the Dish Network channel from satellites in space on to your dish. Those are just a couple of cases there actually a very 26:04

broad range of things happening in space even today radio and TV broadcasts the internet and Wi-Fi tomorrow up and coming thing again with some of 26:12 these says next networks are being deployed and spaces in the next couple years in the next 5 years in the new space-age twenty thousand of 26:20 these are expected to be launched into space, which is it going to wife actress creating the launch facilities and Rockets to make that happen. A lot 26:30 of people also ask aren't we worried about 20,000 he's being a space space is very very fast. They're not even going to be anywhere near close 26:39

together as if we take something it in contacts if you look at a busy day on Earth 10000 flights 26:47 operating at the same time around Earth's orbit. And that's only within six miles of the ground as we talked these Satellites with 300 miles from the 26:55 ground. So the way up there space for the slots around for twenty thousand of these is not even a problem again. They're layered in Earth orbit. So 27:05 somebody will get three hundred miles up at 400 miles up some at 500 miles up so that millions of satellites up there and then have no problems with 27:13

them actually interacting with one another now, that's not to say that things can't happen. One of these satellites could fall out of orbit something 27:21 that happened to it could crash into another satellite. But again there usually up in space and in a very separated faction that that's unlikely to 27:29 happen, but can't happen. There are companies who is pure existence and life is starting up to be capturing a space debris so that when these 27:36 satellites in their useful life that you do around like that for 5 to 7 years, but they will stay in orbit for about 15 years. Once they become non 27:46

useful there. Just just building up there in space. There's no propulsion or anything that you can't get them out of space. They will eventually Decay 27:55 lose their orbit come down to the atmosphere because there is gravitational pull it will eventually take over and they will burn up. So most of them 28:02 will never cause a problem but there are company to feel like instead of letting them hang around out there for 15 years. Let's go out and capture 28:10 them and bring them back. And again, what they do is they use some kind of mad or something where they'll drag it down to Atmosphere where I can know. 28:18

But other applications in space Banking and finance use a lot of satellites actually transfer data between locations on earth a lot of atmospheric 28:27 monitoring a lot of your weather this lot of scientific experiments. Actually, there's being sent to space a lot of universities have satellite 28:36 programs for their teaching in their curriculum information about satellites. They create small cubes ass again. This is the size of satellites that 28:44 create that they launched into space and do some kind of experimentation. A lot of the imagery have bought probably 60% of the satellites in space 28:52

today are imagery satellites are actually satellites that take free pictures of every place on Earth every day. So you can imagine that a lot of data. 28:59 They collect that data. Can they download all the Earth over time? So it's those are collected from about to 925 satellites from companies like Planet 29:08 Labs. You might have heard of them or Squier bass VI taking continuous pictures of Earth to use for reconnaissance purposes. Obviously weather looking 29:16 at floods looking at routes looking at the polar ice cap melting. All kinds of Earth observation watching whale migrations. I mean anything you can 29:25

think of you can look at pictures in and get a lot of information hedge funds use a lot of data from satellites believe or not. They get the a priori 29:35 data by the information until you and I don't even think about they look at cars in parking lots at Walmarts and targets to get an idea of how many 29:42 people are shopping at this location. So they have some extra information that we don't have when they make trades about what's going on in sand 29:48 companies. They actually monitor stock piles of things like oil and oil tanks around the world and things from satellites cuz these oil tanks have 29:55

floating tops and they can look at the Shadows. I know exactly how much oils in an oil tank. So they do some pretty interesting things with satellite 30:03 data is worth a lot of money at the track this kind of stuff search and rescue operation tracking ships most ships that go across the sea. I'll have a 30:11 beacon on them. Like an iot device basically work. They can monitor where that ship is it on. Is it on course, is it on path 30:19 tracking of herds of cattle think about anything else mobile? Basically, that's not in an area where I have constant connectivity. I'm tracking herd 30:27

of cattle. I'm I'm measuring enough temperature so I can sense when a car might be sick and I can go pull it out of the herd tracking as I mentioned 30:37 earlier trucks going across the nation hauling Goods all these things are being tracked by satellite today and we don't even probably recognize and 30:44 realize it a lot of these cameras on satellites are obviously facing the Earth and taking pictures of Earth, but there's also many satellites with 30:51 cameras on the other side facing upward and they're doing things for astronomy. And then there's other things we've actually got one customers 30:59

interested in putting distributed blockchain constellation satellites that we're going to send into space shortly and we mentioned GPS navigation are 31:07 these are all existing satellite applications. Think about the fact that what makes your cell phone. So powerful is not the hen that has set itself 31:16 for the carrier's it's the applications that have been created put on here. So again are our long-term Vision at Vector by making space more 31:26 accessible by dropping these barriers is Wheel out companies that aren't in the space business today in space is completely managed and owned by 31:34

people who are in the space visit who know how to build satellites who have the ability to spend money to to launch rockets. What if I put the 31:42 platform and Spacek in the AWS in space and I give people the ability to upload any kind of application. You can see the power of En Chile that will 31:49 happen. I'll be like your cell phone. It will people have all kinds of Imagine of ideas. We we really sick Innovation and real advances in technology 31:58 coming in space when we get an environment like that available to those kinds of companies to take advantage of That's pretty much it. Turn back on 32:05

The Bob was going to say before it's a fact maybe it's me. Do we have any questions? the audience questions Yes, sir. Step up to the mic. 32:15 Yeah, I guess it's working. Go ahead. So it took today, I know they're pretty old. But Motorola has the 32:25 Iridium satellites and think right. There are low Earth orbiting a bunch of them though that are like five six hundred miles. 32:34 Do you think you see this right now? You mention this very low bandwidth. I'm assuming you're picking that eventually will be more than 32:49

enough process right now that I'm working on things like Optical radios and things that are going to increase the bandwidth. 32:57 There's some challenges there too because they are much higher bandwidth, but they're all so much more impacted by weather and so it's kind of 33:07 trade-off there. But yes the band with will increase reduce the lot of work being done especially if they're trying to put message internet in space. 33:14 They're going to have to increase the bandwidth considerably. So that's that's some real work. When is that sweet? You see this eventually eventually 33:21

giving internet to everyone that doesn't have internet today. And also possibly there's a lot of places even in the 33:29 US where people don't want cell phone towers and there's Suburban neighborhoods things like that possibly helping 33:38 Lights will become as you said cell towers in certain regions. The thing is interesting about low earth orbit as we talked. It's only three hundred 33:49 miles up so late. And so you were talking about 10 milliseconds roughly so it becomes very viable as ASL power. 33:56

Yes. Right now go away latency to the current Geo satellites because they're twenty-three Thousand Miles up. There is 900 milliseconds 34:07 in low earth orbit Unit 10 milliseconds, so it's going to be a breaker questions. Any other questions from the audience? 34:16 I guess we answered everything. I really want to thank Citrix for a partner in with us. We we see some very strategic areas that there were working 34:28 together on we definitely believe that the spaces not the final frontier maybe anymore. It's the new frontier for sure and a lot of activities 34:38

happening there and we're pretty excited weekly patented many of these ideas and Thoughts with Facebook and Pinterest real data centers. These have 34:46 been things have been working for 10 or 15 years or tried-and-true. We believe these will be adopted very quickly in space because again, they been 34:54 tested they work off some of the concepts of everything being custom-developed hardware and start to get more off the shelf Hardware this again read 35:02 harder for space. We see the advance is happening very quickly. Thank you, John. 35:11

I'm so just to wrap up before you leave. There are a couple of related obvious that you might want to go and have a look at the first do stevia side 35:25 effects of boosting the Citrix experience Center. Just look out for the big truck is actually I said size model rocket and I can have a 35:32 chat with John about some of the other challenges in space as well a couple of sessions that I have to bring to my right one on Citrix hypervisor 35:42 801 on what's new in Vestal apps and desktops that could also be really interesting. 35:51

Please also write the section in the Bible. Tell us what you think. Can you get 25 points? Thank you very much. And thank you 36:01 to John there. Any questions, please do you want to stay behind and let us know? 36:11

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