Samantha DeBianchi
Real Estate Advisor & Founder at DeBianchi Real Estate
+ 2 speakers
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Inman Connect San Francisco 2016
August 2, 2016, Emeryville, USA
Inman Connect San Francisco 2016
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Stop thinking like a salesperson
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About speakers

Samantha DeBianchi
Real Estate Advisor & Founder at DeBianchi Real Estate
Joseph Rand
Managing Partner at Better Homes and Gardens Rand Realty
Nick Segal
President at Partners Trust Real Estate Brokerage & Acquisitions

Samantha (Sam) DeBianchi founded DeBianchi Real Estate in July 2011, knowing that her unique background in hospitality and passion for real estate could help her provide the market with an innovative real estate buying and selling experience second to none. Sam has represented a number of athletes, entrepreneurs, investors and locals and provides all of her clients with the best-in-class service.Her drive for excellence coupled with her innate creativity and “over-the-top, out-of-the-box thinking” led her to fill a void missing in the industry and obtain positions writing nationally for Realtor.com, Zillow, Houses.com and Condos.com, as a real estate contributor for Realtor.com and Bankrate.com, having a weekly "real estate advice"​ column in South Florida's Sun Sentinel, and speaking nationally and internationally about the housing market on FOX News, FOX Business, CNBC, CNBC World and Bloomberg. Her expert advice and opinions have been featured on major media outlets including Forbes, Bloomberg, Huffington Post, FOX News, FOX Business, CNN Money, AOL, and Yahoo as well as in various publications, radio shows and television networks across the globe. Sam is also the First Lady of Million Dollar Listing Miami on Bravo TV.In July 2016, Sam launched, SamSpeaks!, a real estate coaching platform that gives real-talk advice and showcases some of the best real estate professionals in the world.

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Joseph Rand is the Managing Partner of Better Homes and Gardens Rand Realty, one of the largest family-owned real estate brokerages in the country. Last year, Better Homes and Gardens Rand Realty participated in over $2.5 billion in real estate transactions, becoming one of the top 100 real estate companies in the country.Joe is also the author of two books about the real estate industry. His first book, "Disruptors, Discounters, and Doubters," is about what the industry needs to do to adapt to outsider challenges, mainly by improving the client experience in buying or selling homes. His second, “How to Be a Great Real Estate Agent,” presents his “Cloent-Oriented Real Estate” training philosophy, showing agents how to build their business by being great at their jobs. Both books are available on Amazon and other online booksellers.Joe is well-known as one of the leading real estate trainers in the country, speaking at national conventions and conferences on the subject of professionalism, business development, and quality service. He is a periodic contributor to the leading real estate industry media site Inman.com, and has maintained several blog sites of his own, including the "Client-Oriented Real Estate" site about his theories on real estate education and his "Move to SUMA" blog about his personal experiences moving from the city to the suburbs.

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Nick Segal is co-founder and CEO of Partners Trust — a discerning and conscientious Los Angeles-based real estate brokerage that has grossed more than $7 Billion in sales since its inception in 2009. A nationally renowned real estate agent and noted speaker, Nick was recently named as one of Variety Magazine’s Los Angeles Real Estate Elite.Since launching Partners Trust, Nick has led the company from its five founding partners to more than 240 active agents with eight offices across Los Angeles and an international office in Shanghai. In 2013, Nick co-founded Leverage Global Partners, an innovative and exclusive network of boutique independent real estate firms around the world. In 2015, Nick and the founders at Partners Trust started PT Charitable Giving Fund, a non-profit foundation that provides financial support to Los Angeles-based charitable organizations.With more than 27 years of experience in the real estate business, Nick has earned the trust of a closely protected list of celebrities, business leaders, and many other notable figures. He is fervently committed to raising the bar of professionalism at every touch point of a real estate transaction, a mission he also brings to his position as Chair of the Professional Standards and Ethics Committee for the Beverly Hills/Greater Los Angeles Board of Realtors®. From this organization, he has received two prestigious awards: Realtor of the Year in 2012 and The William May Garland Award in 2013.

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About the talk

Topic: Business

Think and act like a hustler? That is how your customers will view you, treat you and you won’t have many long term relationships to create asset value for your hard work.

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Thank you. That was a wonderful bit of applause for someone you've never heard of. That was great. That was entirely appropriate. I want to thank you all for being here, I want to thank Inman for having me here. My talk is basically designed to have you stop thinking and talking like a salesperson and what I mean by that and the reason for that is that you're not a salesperson and I know that is tough to hear because everyone has always told you you are

a salesperson like you're going to sales meetings and you go to sales conventions and conferences and you get sales awards and you say you're in sales and it's all about sales. If you're in New York they even make you put licensed salesperson on your business card because the government is stupid and makes you do dumb things like that. But here's the thing. You're not a salesperson and when I say that I'm not being derogatory to salespeople far from it. Sales

people are so important to a business enterprise that every other industry takes that role and divides it. Takes the salesperson role and prioritizes it by making someone do something to only exclusively do sales. Think about like you go to the car dealer. There's a car salesperson there that car salesperson sells cars. That's all he does. He doesn't design cars. He doesn't repair cars. He sells cars if pharmaceutical salespeople they go from doctor to doctor trying to get those doctors to order their prescription drug, but if you get a rash you

don't call the salesperson. There's someone there who stands a question is a service person and design person in other words. There's a handoff. There's a handoff from sales to service in almost every other industry. Even in real estate think about the mortgage. Think about the mortgage people you work with right? On a day-to-day basis. Mortgage loan officers are just salespeople. They  they don't call themselves that because salesperson has kind of a weird ring to most people. Loan officers what they do are they take the order they sit down with a client their job is to

curate relationships. Their job is to canvas their job is to generate opportunities to get an application. They then take that application and they hand it off to someone supposed to service it. Title salespeople total salespeople, you know. Escrow people they either do sales or they do service almost nobody does both except you. That's why your job is so hard. That's why you're so tired. You're doing two jobs, you're doing everything that you need to do as a salesperson, but then, did you get to do a handoff? Wouldn't that be great? Would it be great where you going you sign a

listing agreement shake the person can say good luck selling your home. You can be working with them from now on so long. And you hand it off to somebody else who actually serviced that sell or where you work with buyers and you sign that buyer an exclusive right to represent and then when you're done handing off you go give it to somebody else. Go take these buyers out. Now what we see in this industry because people are recognizing this need to change out the rolls into separate out the roles. Is you get these big teams where the person who leads the team is essentially doing sales and then

has diversified rolls on their team of the people who are actually handling the service aspect of the job. But for most of you, you do it all. You do it all, you do all the sales and all the service most of the other industries they don't do that because they recognize that it's a lot of work and it takes two very different sets of skills very tough to be really good at doing all the sale stuff you need to do, but then also be really good at paperwork. That's why other industries they separate it out. Okay, but here's the thing. It's not just semantics. Okay, it's not just about

well, if we don't call ourselves salespeople that everything's going to be okay. It's not about that. It's about the fact that the sales mentality in real estate has affected everything that we do in this industry. Think about the training that you do how many of you have been to train to go to his coach and these national coaches. What do they coach on? Prospect in sales training is almost all about sales and very little about service. Think about the harvesters we have in the industry in a sales organization. Yeah, you hire everybody you can because the more people you

bring into the industry they bring incremental sales to you. But what does that do to the general level of service of competency we have in this industry. Let me ask you this question. You've been getting asked a lot of questions today so I apologize for this. But how many of you raise your hand if knowing what you know, but if you were no longer in the business, how many of you would refer your best friend to more than half of the agents in your market? That over half the agents in your market are good enough to handle a referral from you of a really good friend. Is anybody hearing there's nobody

like three people's hands up. We have a really really industry-friendly group right there and nobody else have their hands up how many of you would work with 25% at least 25% of the people in your market? When I ask that question I usually get a little bit more hands. What does that tell us? It tells us that we know there's a problem. We know there's a problem with competency in the industry. And where does it come from that comes from the fact that we have this mentality that focuses entirely on sales. Even the way we innovate. Think about all the websites, our websites are great

for lead generation for sales. They are shopping sites. Your website is great for someone who is thinking about buying a home thinking of buying a home. They found their home the site becomes useless. Most Real Estate websites provide no service to a client once they actually find the home that they're going to buy and they decide this is the one but that's the hardest part of the job, right? The hardest part of your job is getting someone from contract to closing and our websites does nothing to help us with that. It's not just semantics. It's the idea that it changes

the way we have built this business and it changes the way we are perceived that the other big problem with being thought of as sales people and you will know this cuz you've all been an open house and you've all met somebody at the open house you go to shake their hand and you're trying to be helpful to them to go. Hi, I'm Joanne for Better Homes and Gardens Grand Realty. And what do they do? Who hey ho hey. They don't want to talk to you they're afraid of you because people are afraid of salespeople. They don't think of you as a service person. They think it was a salesperson

and that's a problem. Even our clients are buyers. How many of you worked with buyers with the buyer wants to play the field the buyer is not willing to commit the buyer called you on Monday morning and they want to tell you about the house. They just made an offer on Sunday at the open house. And they think you could be excited about them. It happens to almost everybody. So what are we going to do about it? We need to change that mindset. We need to stop focusing so much on the sales mentality. Not that you're not salespeople. You're not just salespeople and we

need to start catering more to the fact that a lot of what you do most of what you do on a day-to-day basis is not sales but is actually servicing the needs of clients counseling people's transaction management. It's problem-solving. It's all of these skills. These robust skills that we don't do enough to develop in this industry. So how do we do that? Let me bring out. We have a great panel people talk about this issue. So I'll let Katie bring out her group of Nick Segal and Samantha DeBianchi. They're coming out right now. They're they are and it's Katie Maxwell. Hi

guys, I own a company of ten in South Florida DeBianchi Real Estate. And I also am now launching my coaching platform SamSpeaks. Nick Segal. I am CEO and President at Partners Trust. We are Beverly Hills based. We have 8 locations in Los Angeles one in Shanghai about 250 strong and there we go. All right. So when I was formulating questions again, I hate to keep saying it but when I deal with 110 millennial agents in my office like a whole another you breed of an agent, you know to say it that way with that being said, they all want to be

famous. I see more selfies then I would like to ever even mention and they're really looking for fame by hashtagging like realtor and you know, it's just it's insanity to me. I think the reputation of us as a whole has come down a couple of notches because of things like that tonight and talk about a bad sales pitch. It's worse than going into a car dealership like I don't care about your face. Like you know, what you're doing here. Are you a human being what it what is your opinion? And what happened? And how can we return the reputation of the agent

around so people again respect us like they should. So I was actually on Million Dollar Listing so I can attest to that cuz they're also hashtagging and MDL Million Dollar Listing everything else. I was just telling everyone a story prior in The Green Room about how I had an open house and I had a couple of agents come by and they're like we follow you on TV doing all these things and really want to work with you. I said, okay, why do you want to work with me? And they couldn't really answer that. So I sat them down for an interview, which is interesting because they were

actually very professional but I said, what are your social media platform handles, I'd check them out on Facebook and it was exactly that. Selfie central it was just I was embarrassed for them. And I said guys you have to remember while I don't believe in being the salesperson people will look you up people will want to work with someone they connect with and if you're trying to be professional in this business, if you want that million-dollar client or you want the $200,000 client. How about the level of professionalism and make sure to monitor your social media.

Keep it classy or put it on private, but I'd still keep it classy. Yeah, just stop, like you are in the business so stop doing keg stands. Nick tell me tell me how important is it for agencies days to get out from behind the computer and start connecting again. Yeah. I just to the point of reputation. Here's the great news. You don't have to change the reputation of the real estate industry. You just need to take care of your reputation. So first inform, And whatever you do from that perspective beef be cognizant conscious of what your reputation is and how you want to present yourself

go to that point of getting out from behind the computer. I had at one of my associates was doing 10 million dollars, you are not that that's a great number and he was doing that year after year of the year and we had lunch recently and he says year-to-date. I'm going to be over thirty billion dollars by the end of this month. I said Okay. I need the secret on this one. And he said I realized about 18 months ago. I needed to get out from behind my computer you talked about this morning. How much time you spend on a logo is and how much time we spend on those other things at the end of

the day, it's how do you connect and how do you educate your sphere of influence that you are relevant that you care that you have information that can serve them Joe talks about it out of the gate. So from that perspective what you did? Is he personal notes you had lunch is he picked up the phone and let people hear his voice? Auto away from it. I don't my entire business off of Facebook and I tell people all of the time it's great. If you have the post is going to be at the information but you need to bring old school back

old school is New School these days. That's the best thing that you can do the personal notes. Like you said, if you're not free with handwriting get someone else to do it. There's I know that there's some company out there that right things computerized but it looks like your handwriting which is phenomenal because mine's not so good. But you have to bring that back because that's what's making the difference that Personal Touch that personalization meeting somebody let me ask him real quick when you're coaching or agents along. What do you wish that they would

say when someone says hey, what do you do for a living? Are you can say I mean, there's nothing wrong with saying I'm a real estate salesperson. I help people buy and sell real estate. You could say I'm a realtor if you're one of the people you can say you were real poor because you sound stupid when you say D i s h s Realtors fine. I mean it's the attitude that you bring to it because that's what spread to your clients in this press the people you work with think about this way.

What do Architects do you've never met someone who's an architect salesperson somehow they get business. Why do they take a picture of big business because people recognize that a really good architect is a good thing to have so when they're thinking of hiring an architect where they do they ask around they ask for referrals, they have to find some who's really good. The challenge we have is an industry is that that Asian you talked about who generates all his business or her business by referral is fighting an uphill battle because if they did they have to change the perception that people

out there that people recognize that a great real estate agent makes a difference in the transaction versus a mediocre one, which you don't think about sales people knowing ask for referrals for salespeople. If you're buying a car you don't say I'm thinking of buying a car did a really good salesperson. You don't do that you go. You think about the car you think about the product so we have to we have to convince the world darts with us, but then also changing the mindset out there that people recognize that what we do makes a difference and that a good a good realtor is a lot better

than then makes it can be a big change in the experience that you have. I think we're more of advisors than absolutely to that point. We just need to educate our people but we got to put in the work first and you got to know your markets. You got to know your contracts. You got to know what the value propositions are. You going to know what the statistics statistics are of a Marketplace and then put that out there and people will resonate with it. If you're just asking for orders, you haven't earned the right to ask for that order that's important to know you can use the social media

you could do all these old school methods and you can have great marketing and great advertising, but if you don't have the knowledge to back it up if you haven't done your homework. You don't know the inventory. I tell if anyone wants to work at my company. I say to question. What's the average price per square foot in your neighborhood and name three buildings within a 5-mile radius tell you how many people can't answer both of those questions. Let alone at least one of them sometimes and it's embarrassing and these people are getting a real estate license.

That is scary beforehand something when someone asks you what you do for a living is like I failed home. So I think that's a good takeaway. You know, what all really great real estate agents have in common, then, they're actually really good at their jobs. Like they actually good at helping people through buying and selling real estate and that's how they build their businesses is because they take listings in their listings actually sell them to sit on the market they work as far as they learn those bars and they learn the inventory to

find the buyers the right home and then they know how to take a client from transaction from contract to closing. That's the difference if you're good at your job all sorts of good things happen. They're good at the stuff that goes into doing the job. Thank you. Thank you.

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