Asian American Business Roundtable
January 8, 2020, New York, USA
Asian American Business Roundtable
Request Q&A
Video
AABR 2020 Panel 1: Reimagining The Purpose of a Corporation: Meeting the Needs of Today's Workforce
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Add to favorites
174
I like 0
I dislike 0
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
  • Description
  • Transcript
  • Discussion

About speakers

Lisa Chang
Chief People Officer at The Coca-Cola Company
Michael Alicea
Global Chief Human Resources Officer at Nielsen
Terri Cooper
Chief Inclusion Officer at Deloitte
Anish Batlaw
Operating Partner at General Atlantic

Lisa Chang is chief people officer for Coca-Cola, overseeing the company’s global human resources operations. Chang joined Coca-Cola in 2019.Previously, Chang served as senior vice president and chief human resources officer for AMB Group LLC in Atlanta. AMB Group is the investment management and shared services arm of The Blank Family of Businesses, including AMB Sports & Entertainment, the Atlanta Falcons, Atlanta United FC, Mercedes-Benz Stadium, PGA TOUR Superstores, Mountain Sky Guest Ranch, West Creek Ranch and The Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation.During her four years with AMB Group, Chang led HR strategy for all AMB businesses and was instrumental in the creation and execution of the people and talent strategies that helped successfully launch Atlanta United’s Major League Soccer team and the 2018 opening of Mercedes-Benz Stadium.Prior to joining AMB Group in 2014, Chang served as vice president of human resources for international at Equifax, where she led HR for all of Equifax’s global locations. Before joining Equifax, she was senior vice president of human resources at Turner Broadcasting System Inc., where she led HR strategy for the Technology, Strategy & Operations division and the international division. Prior to Turner, her career included HR roles of increasing responsibility at The Weather Channel Companies, ultimately as executive vice president of human resources.Chang has a bachelor’s degree in communications from the University of Virginia.

View the profile

Michael Alicea possesses a strong background in a broad range of human resource disciplines including employee relations, performance management, training, and corporate initiative fulfillment. He began his career at VNU as Manager of Human Resources for the Media Information Group and he has held a variety of leadership roles within the company in HR, communications, Product Leadership and operations.Prior to his current role, Michael was Senior Vice President of HR for Global Media, and Nielsen Business Media. Before that, he served as Vice President of Operations and COO at PERQ/HCI. Before joining Nielsen, Michael held several HR positions in compensation, employee relations and labor within a large non-profit organization in New York City and with VNU.Michael is presently the Chairman of Nielsen’s External Advisory Board and serves on the Board of Directors for Emerald Expo (EEX).Michael received the Arthur C. Nielsen Chairman’s Award for outstanding achievement. He has been honored by the Imagen Foundation as one of “The Most Influential Hispanics in Media” and was inducted into the Hispanics in Media hall of fame.

View the profile

Dr. Terri is currently Deloitte’s Chief Inclusion Officer.Terri has a personal passion and commitment to growing and developing talent at all levels. As chief inclusion officer, Terri drives Deloitte’s strategy to recruit, develop, and advance a diverse workforce and foster an inclusive environment. She is focused on advancing inclusive leadership at all levels to advance inclusion in workplaces today.Terri has more than two decades of experience working in various capacities of the life sciences and health care industry, including participating in a broad range of strategic advisory services. She has created new global operating models; supported the integration of development, regulatory, and drug safety functions in a number of Life Sciences company mergers; restructured all aspects of the research and development (R&D) value chain; and driven increased cost and efficiency measures.She holds a Joint Honors Bachelor of Science Degree in Chemistry and Pharmacology and a PhD in Pharmacology from the University of London, UK.

View the profile

Anish Batlaw is an Operating Partner at General Atlantic and leads the firm’s human capital effort as part of the firm’s Operations Group. Anish and his team help develop GA’s talent network, assess and develop best-in-class management teams, and provide support on organization design, executive compensation, governance structures and in general providing strategic Human Capital counsel to GA and its portfolio companies. Before joining General Atlantic in 2015, Anish worked at TPG Capital as an Operating Partner and Head of Human Capital for Asia. Prior to that, Anish served in various leadership positions at Novartis, including Vice President and Head of Human Resources for Pharmaceuticals for the U.S. and Europe and Head of Corporate Talent Management. Earlier in his career, he worked at Microsoft as General Manager of Human Resources and at PepsiCo in markets including the U.S., India, China, and Vietnam.Anish holds a BA (Honors) degree in Economics from Delhi University and a Post Graduate Honors Diploma in Personnel Management from Xavier School of Management (XLRI) in India.

View the profile

About the talk

As the workforce and technology continue to evolve rapidly, organizations and their leaders are presented with both a myriad of opportunities and the toughest challenges yet. Today’s workforce is eager to understand their organization’s diversity and inclusion strategies and how this may influence the societal impact overall. Business Roundtable’s statement on “the purpose of a corporation”, issued in 2019, is a direct response to these trends, and also a monumental shift in corporate convention.

Esteemed panelists will reflect on the trend of corporate purpose and will focus on how the growing CEO interest and action in advancing diversity objectives influence the level and focus of internal D&I conversations — the value and best practices of the partnership between the CEO, CHRO and CDO; what challenges they face related to advancing D&I goals within their companies, and how they plan to keep up with the demands of today’s workforce that is currently reshaping the business landscape.

00:27 Diverse workforce

05:05 Inclusive culture

09:34 Focus on the purpose

14:41 Whole circle of the world

19:26 History about the company

24:05 Minority investing

28:46 Providing the insights

32:43 Values-based organization

36:58 Great platform

40:01 Providing the opportunity

44:31 Corporate responsibility

48:38 Top leaders in the company

51:35 Budget of the company

Share

We're about to start our first panel discussion of the day reimagining the purpose of a corporation and the focus is on the evolving workplace in the challenges and opportunities that come with that focusing on the context of diversity and inclusion, and it is my pleasure to introduce you to the moderator of this panel. Dr. Terry Cooper. She's the chief inclusion officer for Deloitte or she drives the strategy for recruiting developing and advancing a diverse Workforce and is known among other things for incredible research studies, including

a couple that are really pertinent to the topic at hand today. They're going to hear more about those as well. Please put your hands together for dr. Terri Cooper. Well, thank you everyone. I must mention. I'm Terry Crew for the chief inclusion officer to Deloitte and I'm truly delighted to be here today at the Asian American Business Roundtable and to actually Host this important conversation on diversity and inclusion within today's Workforce. I would also be remiss if I didn't

wish you all a Happy New Year as well. So to kick us all I really wanted to spend a few minutes to level set what we mean and around the definitions that we leverage for diversity and inclusion because I think a lot of times we enter play the two I'm just really wanted to make sure that we had some clarity and how we look at this particular issue. To us diversity is the different skills the backgrounds the attributes and the perspectives that each individual brings to the table. But inclusion is around leverage and what makes each person unique

in a way that encourages them to be authentic and to know they are valued and and you probably heard the saying a lot of times before but I look at diversity is being invited to the party where is inclusion is being asked to dance and there's a distinct difference that Now we know that the workforce and Technology as has already been discussed this morning continues to evolve really rapidly within organizations. And as a result of that lead is a truly presented with both the Myriad of opportunities as well as some of the toughest

challenges yet, you know today's what forces are organizations diversity and inclusion strategies and how this may influence the social impact overall and I think many of you are aware and I know this is having a profound effect on us as well when I think about my role and inclusion and diversity does expanded around social impact as well that as a result of the Business Roundtable statement on the purpose of a corporation issued. I'm towards the end of last year. This is a direct response to the trends. I know such a Monumental shift that isn't

involved in corporations right now. Let me share a little bit with you about Deloitte. We really looked at inclusion and we've really been advancing our gender from a two-fold approach. The first is around our overall organization. I'm very proud of the fact that we've been helping to shape America is inclusion landscape since 1993. When we became one of the or became the first professional service organizations. You should women's and diversity initiatives and over the years but a few things that remain constant

and that is around. Leadership commitment around. Continuous evilution an Innovative approach to fostering an inclusive culture and I'm proud to enough to actually share with you that this is so important that I like a speaker. I asked you to report directly to see you at the firm as a result of the importance of this particular. But it's also important that we as we evolve and we move forward with me. Think about how we really Drive in a culture of inclusion and a culture. That's really looking at social impact for us. It's

important that I caught two really focuses on how do we connect all of our individuals all of our professionals and as mentioned earlier, we're in a unique position where we are already at the stage where greater than 70% of our total Workforce here in the u.s. Is Millennials or younger and so it's really important that we create that environment what each of them feels that they can belong that they can be there all Centex out and they can grow unless they feel the growing within an organization that really has an impact as it relates to the social purpose. The one of

the things that we've really been focusing on his ramp, how do you in French. Inclusive culture and to all service six really key signature traits that every individual really needs to be focusing on and demonstration in the day-to-day activities. And these behaviors are these traits. We also refer to them as the sixties a really around bu show a personal commitment to create an inclusive environment. Are you committed to establishing true collaboration with every individual feels as though they have a

boys. Are you curious about this? Are you curious about finding out about people's strengths and how you cannot Redevelopment them further. All you Coach Lee intelligent. Are you cognizant of your boss and perhaps most important of all are you prepared to be courageous? And that's really a foundation for us right. Now as we move forward another example a mystery wrapped up into the soft Tunes discussion. We've evolved business resource Group Employee resource groups. We still have them but we've created what we pulled inclusion council's as

of way in which we can bring and build a sense of community to encourage authenticity and to bring those connections for everybody together rather than individuals being defined from a one-dimensional lens solution councils are crossed every one of our local offices and they really truly bring individuals of different backgrounds together. Not only to celebrate the similarities but to actually gain a greater knowledge and understanding differences, but also importantly to think about how we can drive more social purpose. Link to that. We have a

significant focus on him proud well-being and he's really out holistic approach that gets that people to support in the flexibility to make daily choices that truly enabled them to maintain that energy be constant in a way that is so critically important in today's technology age where that feeling of being on 24/7 really has a significant impact on everyone. So as we move forward as mentioned we try and do a lot of research in this area and I thought I'd share with you one element around the importance of having

that inclusive culture the importance of organizations thinking about inclusion as it relates to that social impact as well. Recently, we actually put together a piece of research unleashing the power of inclusion. And what was fascinating for us is that 80% of the respondents indicated that inclusion is a critical component for them when they're selecting an employee and a 39% of respondents report that they would leave that Karen Organization for more inclusive Swan if it's not living up to their expectations around that

inclusive environment as well as that there ain't expectations as it relates to the purpose. And in fact, almost a quarter of individuals reported they've already left organizations because they didn't fulfill those requirements. So if we think about the today's panel this title in there on the following panels, it's really important that we recognized and inclusion can truly make or break. Today's Workforce as organizations continue to wage The Wolf of Italian culture can be that deciding factor. We know that individuals of the workforce of today

wants to feel that they can be themselves. They want that perspectives to be heard and they want to feel that everybody has a seat at the table when we Austin Millennials and younger, you know, what is it? That is the most important to them when they're thinking about that inclusive culture. There are really three elements. Old sensitivity that they want to feel that they can be themselves that they can leverage that unique strengths and that they can share that perspectives. Flexibility, I think that was already discussed earlier choose and where and when they were gets done

without having to compromise other aspects of their life and the part that we really want to focus on this morning. That's while he's around purpose. How can they make an impact and understand how that work truly fit into the bigger picture? So with that I'm delighted that we have our steam panelist here. I manage Bachelor and Lisa Chang. And what we're going to do here is reflect on the trends that are developing around corporate purpose and focus on how growing CEO interest an action is truly advancing the diversity

objectives and really focusing on those conversations. I'm really trying to draw a rat. What's the value in the best practices of those Partnerships between the cro the CHR of the CTO on walk challenges they faced as it relates to Advanced and depressing inclusion growth within that companies and how they can plan to keep up with the demands of today's Workforce. That's currently reshaping the business landscape with a real specific photo Focus around purpose. So with that I'm going to join a panelist on the Bayou.

Doing the panel is that buyers are actually in the documents that have all the conference details for love, but I thought rather than me sort of reading out. I said, it'd be a great idea if I lost Lisa and an H2 actually introduced themselves pissed me. So least I'm going to ask you to tell at the oldest little bit about yourself. Hello. Sorry technical difficulties. Good morning. Thank you for inviting me to be here John. I really appreciate the opportunity and I'm honored to be on the panel with you need to today. I'm Lisa Chang and I am the chief people and

culture officer for Coca-Cola. So interesting lady that I follow Indra healthy competition a lot of respect to my Pepsi Compadres over there. I'm obviously we are in the same business together, but I am new to Coca-Cola. I have only been with the company for 10 months previous to that. I have been a career HR leader and general manager working in media and entertainment. I worked for Turner and CNN on globally. I also worked for the professional sports teams in Atlanta working for the owner of the Atlanta Falcons. The Atlanta United Soccer Club

Mercedes Benz Stadium as well working financial services. So I have been able to make a 27-year career out of working for all the companies based in Atlanta. I think that's a unique attributes and you know, my diversity comes not only being Asian but being a southern Asian, which there are not many of us. So I'm delighted to be here and looking forward to our conversation today. Thanks, please citrate. Good morning, John and I'm delighted to be here today.

DNA is very close to my heart and I'm looking forward to learning from all of you leave. That's terrific to be on the same stage of you. I work at General Atlantic General Atlantic is a grill tank with a farm. We invest in growth companies. My role of the company is to help develop management teams and board of directors for the companies that be investing we have about a hundred hundred and eight hundred and ten companies 110 companies of that about seeing our portfolio today. A week college track sometimes because the portfolios Dynamic some

companies are joining and some companies are exiting all the time. I've been in this type of role for about 10-12 years now in in the US headquarters in the US, but also at one point in time headquartered in in Hong Kong before I came into private Equity at work with three different companies. I started my career with PepsiCo in India that was about thirty years ago and the gorge Kapoor if you have we work together and help start-up Pepsi's business and India went from 10 people to about 5,000 a pH of about three years, and then came to the US worth in the US here at

Pepsi's headquarters office office has moved in from Pepsi to go work for Novartis and Switzerland. We live to me and my wife and family live in Switzerland for about five years, but I walked with the water Pharmaceuticals. We came back to the US after that and worked with the Microsoft and also will defend to Novartis for a few years as the head of HR for for the businesses in India. Nautica's and old little stint at Microsoft Word a letter to HR for one of the few divisions and just to round it out with then went to Hong Kong. So we've we've been back and forth

between Asia us Europe Hong Kong and we done whole circle of the world twice Over The Taking of 30 years ago, but but but it's not mentioned in the evening, It's obviously we recognize diversity inclusion is so critically important for all of our organizations, but we also know that purpose is top-of-mind today and that's one of the things that would be awesome or more about and a younger generation of really really focusing on you know, what is the social purpose? What how are we actually time this

together? So I'm going to walk supposed to be but I'll start with you Lisa. Could you provide some background or overview on how your organisation Coca-Cola was truly looking to instill a sense of purpose and the impact that has on your couch because I know that something that you have been working on very significantly as a positive 10 to 12 months. Yes. Thank you. And when I connected with Terry on this panel, I thought that this was just like a plant because that has been my mission really at Coca-Cola for the last 10 months in one of the reasons. I joined

the company from the outside is the transformation of the business much like our counterparts over at Pepsi. We've obviously had to transform our business and what intrigued me about the opportunity to join Coca-Cola at the time was this inflection point of needing to identify. Who are we we are 133 years old. I live a very rich long history and as Interpol. I doubt this morning there, you know is it was it's a competitive landscape and they're bent Dynamics and in the world that have shifted our business models from waste2water to lots of other things

and so as I started to talk with the company about joining what was clear to me is that we were at a point where we really need to ReDiscover who we were and my first meeting that I joined a Coca-Cola was our leadership meeting. It was the top 200 leaders we gathered together in Bale. I hadn't even started it was two weeks prior to my first day and it was discussing sort of how do we get to this new growth model that we want to be at and the resonating seem was these are the top 200 leaders of the company who are all asking. What is our purpose? Why are we here? What are we here to do and

our CEO James Quincey who has been president and Chief Operating Officer for the last 4 years recently named chairman and CEO in March. They don't know why it why don't they know you know, and then as we we we took it away from the meeting and we said, you know what we're going to figure this out and it sounds like you know, that's really not a good thing that we didn't know that but I think what we did is we took it away and we said to ourselves. You know, what we really need to reflect on. What is it that we're what's the problem? We're trying to stop it. It's not the

business strategy. We have our business strategy beverages for life. We knew that we needed to expand our portfolio and address some of the things like the waist in the sugar in the water. But this was really about personal purpose and about re inspiring this new generation of workers into really connecting with our products are Brands and our company in a way that resonated and so we really went on a journey and I was telling Terry that the journey we went on was one of Nunnally self-reflection. We talked to her employees. We did some focus groups. We talked to ngos. We talked to her

investors. We talked to her board. I mean, it seems like this really Intricate process that we went through but what we learned along the way was that sometimes the answer is so clearly in front of you that you don't see it. You spend so much time trying to develop something that is fresh and new and modern and exciting and you know, we went kind of all of what we looked at. Everyone's purpose statement Vision, let like everyone else probably does and you know, we recently unveiled if you will are refreshed purpose no

pun intended. So if someone could put my slide up its really profound All right. There you go. Refresh the world make a difference. I know what you're thinking it took you that long to come up with that. Yes, sometimes the simplest things are the hardest but I think what's what's important about this? And and the reason I want to show the journey is what we did and what our CEO did with all the state and information that we gave him is he went off and he pulls from the archives a hundred

years worth of history about the company. Who are we what started our business what inspired our company to start? What was the secret formula? What was the partnership with our customers had a we go from a being a US company to a global company and all along the way what was clear to us is our purpose hasn't changed. It's always been about refreshing the world in our customers. The only thing that has changed is sort of the feeling behind it in terms of what the term refresh mean because at the time it probably had a more narrow meaning around, you know

refreshing the palate. And today our meeting is much more around refreshing the entire person this whole the life. And so the addition that we added was to make a difference which is really a meaningful part of our purpose statement because we also feel that we have a social responsibility to be a stellar employer a stellar brand and to support the communities in which we live and Coca-Cola has had a rich history of doing that but even more so to your point, which I'm sure we'll talk more about this new generation of

employees expects and demands that companies be socially responsible. And so the collection of our personal purpose about who we are as a brand and what our expectation is that we expect not only our company to do but our people to do is now reflected in this. So this is a long-winded answer to your question of the journey that we've been on but I'm really excited about this rollout. It's just launched and I'll tell you a little bit more about sort of our plans with it. Thanks, Lisa Anish, obviously, you know we had luck from at least around a little bit from

this morning. Obviously, you're like the businesses is a little different from the point of view of the financial side. I would love to understand similar question around. You know, how is Papa's coming to the Forefront in the work that you're doing? And how does that really focuses while around your time and your professionalism what they're really looking for with it within in a general Atlantic? Yeah, she's probably compliment leave the first by Publix mission statement of the purpose statement was fantastic. It's so simple so easy to digest so easy to remember

we are investors, but but I think to just say that is is not going to do full Justice to who we are prepared to tell that story. I would say we probably would I probably need to take you back about forty years when General Atlantic was formed and GA was formed when Chuck Feeney had sold his interest in duty-free shops and had set up Atlantic philanthropic and general Atlantic at that point in time with a captive investment firm or Atlantic philanthropic and and Chuck Feeney is mission in life was to

give away most of his money during his lifetime and he's credited as being one of the biggest philanthropist office times and it's given away over 8 billion dollars during his lifetime and beeping very humbled to have played a small part and help. And expand the capacity to this notion of expanding capacity in doing good is a key part of the culture that stays away GA and almost every partner than every principal in some shape or form is participating in that now Atlantic as as an investor is is a growth Equity investor and and what I mean by that

is that we try and find first and then partner with very high quality entrepreneurs who have come up with creative a new ideas and then health and skill their businesses. We we started off by being investors in in the tech sector and over the. Of time have diversify into other sectors which includes Healthcare Services Life Sciences more recently technology still continues consumer and Retail Financial Services. Wait for me to explain that would be one way of growth second. We're all about growth second. We are all about being a global firm and a connected

partnership and and thirdly we we we we are all about this notion of of partnership whether it's a partnership internally with NGA or whether it's a partnership with a fellow shareholders the most part we do minority investing with influence or it's a partnership with companies that we work with management team to the board of directors. Excellent. Thank you. I was reflecting as you were both talking about the purpose to also think about values so we know that when today's what falsehoods looking to make that choice is

whether it's for potential employees, whether it's as consumers or if it's as investors that really focused on looking at the alignment around value is not know what the Lord that something that we're constantly when we're looking at a social responsibility around what are our core values and how do we demonstrate those on an ongoing basis? And then also obviously how do we then react to situations that occur in the external environment. About four walls, I would love to get your thinking on. How does your

organization really leverage the role of values as you're designing your business strategy and the communication? He have with your professional so and maybe you could take the lead. They recently about a year or so ago invested in a company which witch is which which has an incredible potential for growth. And and and we we help the company set off their strategy. I'll find you in the strategy with the CEO of was appointed. Can you get me now? Felt so we

messing this company about a year or so ago. The company was formed to serve a purpose which is to support. It's it's it's customer groups and end a week. It was at a very early stage and that's what we had to appoint a CEO help the CEO of Builders his management team also set up a board of directors for the company worth with the CEO at a craft a strategy and in the company slowly started to take shape. However, the company wasn't doing as well as we expected this company to do the pipeline was not crate

2022 not look fantastic. And so we bought a little watered about what we had that signed up for and at about this time there was a strategic who came to us and made us an offer for about to ask the money that we had invested in this company. Now, you know, it would have been easy for us as an investor to say. Caution one. Yeah, we are doubling our money. Let's just take it and go right my my partner who leads this investment. He made a pretty gutsy decision where he said that the right thing for us to do at this point in time is to stay true to our purpose and and we

decided to double down we said no to that offer because we truly believe in the in the value that this company is going to create over the long term. We have to let the CEO go because he wasn't performing well, so even if you think about the investors, mine said it would have been so easy for the semester to say I do not have a leader in the company. My company is not performing. Well, let me take let me double my money and get out of here, but big Cosby a long-term investors and because we truly believe in helping the company's of find a path and skill them appropriately. He made that

got a decision to say no. I don't need I don't want to make that struck dumb decision that real estate investment in the car. That's that's one way our long-term orientation on grill plane out in this thing. I really appreciate that around the values. Maybe we can pave it a little bit from the point of view if you can believe in anything around from A diversity and inclusion lens because I know we at Deloitte have challenges at times around adhering to our values and then thinking about the type of

work that we may do with other organizations and so really and that's becoming more and more challenging as we move forward in a while to see we work with the whole platter of different clients in different Industries across different sectors excetera in the time. So we got challenged by our employees around why we doing that type of work and I didn't thought that you know, if you can perhaps provide some insight that from a Coca-Cola lens as well. I must start with also mentioning that when we redid our purpose statement and went through sort of the

exercise of who are we and we danced around as most people do between Mission dishin values purpose. What's the difference in you know, kind of the whole Smorgasbord that's there and what I would say about values just generally is Coca-Cola has had a series of five values for a really long time and their inclusion collaboration and communication in the typical ones that you know, if you type it if you Google values they all come up at what we decided to do this time is not get rid of them because some of them have been reinvented into things like we have growth behaviors that we're really

focused on is what's going to drive the growth of our business and it's in a it's mines at its being inclusive. It's making sure that we're collaborating and communicating but to your point about sort of where does that lead us? We feel that one thing Coca-Cola has pretty much the treaty with sort of doing the right thing. It's something that although I'm not really a formal tagline of ours is something that we feel like we have always done. And so we as part of our purpose sad to ourselves we're going to use that as the guy post to

make decisions about is this the right thing to do or is this not the right thing to do and we wave factors including what's the impact to not only our business and our people but just Society is a Holter constituents in our stakeholders because again much like a lot of other consumer companies, we don't think about our employees. I mean our consumers are I can switch with bass as well. And so hopefully that's something we take into consideration The Challenge and the dynamic that we're dealing with is a very polarizing world and no matter what decision you seem to make you are

alienating a good percentage of other people, you know, because whatever your political views or religious views Environmental views there's always sort of the opposite side think the approach that we tend to take though is not trying to beat people over the head with the decision that we've made but to really stands true and be honest about why we made that decision and linking it to the values of the company to the business models of the company. I think there are I believe it CVS that made the decision to stop selling tobacco in there and in their stores when you make a decision like

that, it is controversial on many levels. But if you stay true to your purpose typically all you can ask for is respect of the values that you put out there as opposed to necessarily 100% agreement. So we feel that that's an important part of its diversity and inclusion is what makes this world as great as it is and if we all agreed on everything it would not be quite as interesting and many of us wouldn't have jobs. So I really appreciate that beautiful. What we will have to contend with we have you know, every organization has that values every organization is really trying

to do the right thing for that business for that people the right thing for Society at large. But you know, that's what makes our role so challenging right now to be completely candid is whenever going to keep make everybody happy all of the time but it's awesome. Italy I think from a corporation to have a stand and be clear and to bring everything back to the ground and around the volume is the only thing I would add to that is consistency. So I think the credibility of an organization and the sustainability of your values has to do with how consistent you are and exerting those values and

when you bring them up, so if you are changing the decisions that you make based on what I've what's the meaning of topic does your then? It is much harder for people to feel like you are values based organization. But if you're consistent with that that is extremely important. Known that I mentioned in the opening comments around the Business Roundtable announcement of the statement and really from the point of view of moving away purely from Drive-In Financial benefits for organizations, but also thinking about how do we really address this whole issue as it relates to

social purpose and obviously Alex gorsky. The CEO of J&J is really challenged everyone in that regard and really made this a call to action Anisha be interested in understanding from your perspective how you move forward with that calls to action and how is that inspiring your sense of purpose when it relates to your approach around corporate responsibility or diversity and inclusion. It's it's so important right? I mean if you think about not just one stakeholder but shareholders but all the stakeholders in the business which which

are employees communities that we serve. It is so important for a company that wants to sustain the performance over the long run that it finds meaning and purpose and Subs all the different stakeholders are so critical to do that. What do you think about how we've been trying to approach it and be a growth Equity investors? So so so we've we've looked at obviously topics like what's the diversity on on the board companies that we've invested in? What what is sorry. Is this better? Diversity on on Boards of companies that they've invested in

diversity on on on the management teams in in the company's again that we may invest in but we we also look at what does diversity mean two different people around the world diversity in for a company which which serves customers in India could be very different from diversity for customers for companies that sell cast Amazon Germany to to custom two companies that that work here in the US and until we we brought with a different offices around the world. We found a phone to diversity Council which post together all eye professionals from different not at all but a representative

sample of professionals from different off assistive Define, what does diversity mean in different countries and then partnered with local companies to that? I'm sorry. I lost it was really around the social at the corporate responsibility how it defines you as well as to look at what it what is diversity look like on the boards. And a non management teams. And what does it look like internally? Add GA the second thing that we look at is we look at engagement and inclusion score. So when we invest in the company, one of the first things we do is we run an employee

engagement survey to understand how do the employees feel about the company in through various service. I think your phone's done a survey or a research project and so has Mackenzie and and you've clearly identified that when you have diversity on boards and companies the performance of the businesses tends to be consistent consistently high. So so we certainly strive for that. We also partner closely with organizations like goes to invest and and to to catch people young and bring them into our form and give them the exposure

are models more of an apprenticeship model of development, but partnering with firms like those two bringing to help us bring in talent and then groom them with The organization we also work very closely with our companies to to come up with Community Development action plans. That'll give back to the community. And yeah, I talked about this initially. We have a culture of giving it a ga and which was which is based in The Roots right Chuck Feeney a phone the company and and that culture of giving a Finds Its way not only inside the farm but also in the Investments that we end

up making recently invested in a company called benevity which you know, if you if you don't already know this company, I could probably pull and put in a 2-minute plug for a great platform. Which which would you help you organize your your goodness work that you do inside your phone. So we we invest in companies like those as well. But those are some examples of how we thank you so much, and I'm sure you're in a similar situation to us that you got. Thousands of requests around how Coca-Cola

could perhaps pull mold from a corporate responsibility perspective definition of programs in particular being such a large Global organization. How do you set up look at that is in a hand. Do you have an overall strategy around the focus around your corporate responsibility and again, you know, how does that tie back to the diversity and inclusion within your organization? Yes. Definitely. We do have a very key pillars that we focus on and we're sort of rounding out a couple of key commitments that we've met water obviously an important one sustainability

and Plastics. We obviously make a man or making normous investments in that space with other partners in the industry. And then one of the big things that we have been working on his women and the advancement and empowerment of women in the organization we have publicly Stated that we want to be 50% lead by women. And so the plan for that is active sponsorship support development recruiting retention and sponsorship of organizations that promote women. So you may be familiar with it. I program at Coca-Cola called 5 by 20. It

was a program that our previous chairman and CEO muhtar Kent put in place. Whereby we committed the power 5 million women by 2020 and we have nearly completed the achievement of that goal and will complete the achievement of that goal this year. And this is through investments in communities where women are suppressed and oppressed. So if you go to places like Africa and Indonesia and India, we in the Philippines, we provide business training and Investments and small businesses to help them learn how to make business owners and and how to give back

to their own communities provide personal support to get themselves in a Not being able to support future generation had the opportunity to travel to the Philippines early in my tenure and I met with a group of about 25 women that had been impacted by R5 by 20 program. And these were women who had previously Ennis cabbage for a living they weren't business owners, but 3D Investments, we made in education training and Investments that we gave them they were able to start small businesses. I'm called sorry. Sorry that are very small little and convenience chains and I sat and had

lunch with one woman who told me that she had pretty much gone from going from meal to meal to being able to provide an opportunity for her own child to have an education in her aspiration was for that child to eventually come to the u.s. And Scotty. So I think they're programmed like that that not only link back to who we are but invest in the communities in which you know, we have consumers that we support and Much like again our counterparts some of the products that we provide our special things and so it's important for us to make sure that we're able to help them

provide for that. So some of the Investments we've made are driven by the strategy that we have. We are amplifying obviously our support to Multicultural as well as women and then again in texts and ability front that's just going to continue to be an important part of of of what we are focused on I loved interest story about sort of going back to simpler times. I think that's really well. We're headed back to the days of having are bringing your own receptacle as opposed to getting paper cups as it's just kind of ironic that that's where we're headed. But you know, I think that's

that's a key driver Who We Are So I'm going to ask one more question and whilst I'm doing that. I'd love the audience to think about any questions that you might have for a nation for lease or as well. So it's a male swan and then we're open it out to all of you. I also mentioned earlier on and you know I said, do you know we have over 70% of all professionals here in the US are millennials or younger and so they certainly keep us on our toes as it relates to social purpose and being a particular because we know that 39% of individuals. I likely to

leave an organization if they don't feel that bad day today, what is also linked to how they feel personally that the drive-in pup has I'd be curious to know and he's how do you engage with your professional find ways in which they have the time and opportunity not I need to do that the day-to-day business, but how do you help me get engaged and to really Drive Martha Subs? Empire Pets from a GI perspective a small firm from a headcount standpoint we have about 400 watt professional. So it might be easier for us to do

this are our model is an apprenticeship model when we hire a person into the firm. They work very closely within their teams which could mean working closely with a partner or the principal internally IGA and then working very closely with the management teams and the boards of the company set up very early stage. They have an opportunity to serve on a board or a be an observer on a board. So so they do from a professional standpoint the they have the opportunity to to express themselves and

participate in different ways from a social standpoint. We encourage them. To do a couple of things one. We encourage them to find their path. So if somebody's really interested in say investing in his face and ESG badly popular right now, we encourage them to move in that direction if they would so want to move if somebody is really interested in exploring HR little related platforms and they they want to work in identifying investments in that space. We encourage them to do that the second language try and do as we

really encourage them to to work with non for profit organizations that would be important to them and and provide them with opportunities to either work directly support them as a firm in what does organizations might want to do, but also help them get bored opportunities with those organizations and help them be a better board board member for those company. Different ways of supporting them those of being exempt organization and not regard Lisa from a Coca-Cola

perspective. How do you think about your Millennials and younger and how how do you engage them? Because I know we have the same sort of challenges from the point of view. There's a lot that we do from a corporate responsibility perspective, but there's an olive and around how do you communicate that down and how do you get the engagement of your of your own people on those initiatives as we were going through our purpose Journey one of the things that we really focus in on his what does the millennial generation think of purpose and what

does it mean to them? And how do we make sure that it resonates with them? So they're a couple things that we did. The first thing we did with the launch is counter to traditional Coca-Cola ways because we have primarily been a marketing company. Are we defined the campaign from Soup To Nuts it's perfect. It's well produced their posters and cups and t-shirts and buttons and you know the day you walk in the whole place is plastered with the new purpose and everybody know it's sort of like here it is, you know live it took

a different approach largely because we listen to people that work on ization and the younger generation who basically don't want to be told what do you think? It's sort of condescending to put it in their face like that? So instead our launch was a much more humble our chairman CEO got up at a town hall and basically said the people look this is what we've come up with. We think it's pretty good. But we want you to soak in it and live and swear to tell us what we're doing right and tell us if we need to refine it a little bit and make it your

own so we didn't do what we did in the past which is Made everybody cookie cutter think about it. What we're going to do instead is have different groups of employees whether you're with a brg or you're at a department or whatever really spend some time talking about what does purpose mean to you? And what does our purpose mean to you? And how does it show up where you are? So I think the shifting from you. No, thanks. Just as it extremely. Well, I mean they've done amazing things that Microsoft under his leadership is you have to go from a know-it-all calls her to learn it all culture.

Right? And so we're trying to shift our own mentality from you know, we don't know all the answers to giving people the platform for it. So I think that's that's one thing we did the second thing is it's going back to this listening. Peace because I had to present our new purpose and culture with our chairman to the board and one of the most impactful things we did as I gave the assignment to a group of Millennials in our company, and I said go produce a little, you know, 3-minute video. On what culture and purpose means to you and they said well what you wanted to say what

I said, it's it's it's yours and it came back and it was spot-on. It was authentic and this really impactful and I think if you listen, it makes all the difference if you have that flip between in the past, you would brief the senior Executives and train them all Junior and that flip now from the point of view of actually really training our Executives around things have changed and we have to think about how do we bring that broader perspective and how do we pivot on the way

in which we've done things in the past to ensure that we bring that thinking the opportunity for our younger generation to really have ownership around Howard driving things for it. So, that's great. Thank you. I'm quick any questions from the audience. back to the back Thank you sis for Lisa. You mentioned that your goal at Coca-Cola has to be 50% male female at a certain point. I'm curious about how you're engaging men in the discussion around elevating Women Within the organization question. We definitely have involved all the men in the

organization around it from our CEO to other men in the organization. We have a global Women Leadership Council, which is comprised of top leaders in the company that are specifically asked to elevate the discussion and agenda on how we achieve our goals and objectives with the senior leadership team and there are men on that committee who are at the table helping us understand what we need to do. We try to be obviously as inclusive as possible even in our aspiration for that and it's it's it really is about inviting them to the table and making sure they understand that it's not at

the exclusion of men but it's sort of in collaboration with them. So it's a journey we're all learning it. We're very grateful for all the support that we have from her our chairman and the board down great. Thanks, Lisa. Anybody else has another one at the box for public companies which are constrained or have a quantity and annual Financial targets to hit. How can we make the case inside companies that all these social purpose and do good kind of things can translate into commercial value and drive growth in top-line and bottom-line.

How do we make the business case? Did that to Lisa? I mean, it's a great logical question. However, there are studies abound if you look on how being socially responsible being culturally responsible being focused on people all the softer stuff does directly translate into better financial performance. I mean, it's the impetus for the Business Roundtable actually Bucyrus, Ohio State Street Bank put out it it's it's just a fact it happens. I think what what you discover is overtime businesses are run by people. And so you have to really

focus on what drives people what motivates them in order to turn that into productivity for a company. So, you know, I would say that I think it was harder. Yeah, probably 10-15 years ago to have this conversation. It's not hard today. I'm sure that you're probably dealing with it a little bit too at these. And the startup companies do not underestimate the pressure on private companies to perform on a quarterly basis either when when does Capital that's invested in the company and the people who provide the capital do expect performance and consistent set of performance against the

budget that have been laid out. So I think the pressure is there on public companies and we have both public and private companies have pressure on public companies results of pressure and private companies. The only difference I think would be sometimes in private companies are easier to make a longer-term bath and take some pain in the shock them in the interests of developing a stronger and more healthy company longer-term. That's fed. I think. Programs and investment in program should be part of running a business should be part of the cost of the business, right and that needs

to be built into the into the budget and and the company would then need to deliver on those budgets are like, yeah, I think one of the company's public or its private they need to think longer-term and when the Tango longer-term sustainability is usually important sustaining a business performance is hugely important to an end and so is there for satisfying the needs of all the stakeholders totally agree because they're not at the exclusion of each other right? If you don't perform you're not a business we have sort of an interesting internal comparison in

being a company that's a hundred and thirty-three years old. Some of our cultural revolution has been met with a bit of skepticism by people that have been with the company for a long time. Where would I feel we're not a family culture anymore what happened to the family environment and our CEO makes it very clear. We're not a family. 14 and the team is required to perform an absolutely we're going to take care of of you provided the company gets what we need out of it in a meaningful way. So I think the short-term and long-term have to balance each other out,

but they can't be done at the exclusion of each other. So sorry, we're almost out of time another few other questions, but I think you can grab a panelist in the break just in passing comments is that one thing one piece of advice that you would like to leave with your audience. I know mine from the point of view. We think about everything we've discussed is really around being authentic as a leader actually really ensuring that you are spending time in actually really communicating and embedding yourself in the team The North Face of the In-N-Out in Christ hierarchy,

but I actually really be authentic be that listen learn and as we said before let out of Junior generation really trainer so that be my word of wisdom, but I'm uneasy about yourself. Yes, I can. I don't know but Vice to the audience, but I can probably share with you advice that I constantly give myself a hand which has to come in every day and and do something a little bit better than what I did yesterday and and and it's it's it's just having belief right that we've been given this gift of his great machine, which is a human body

does incredible things and can change and evolve as time goes on and and the belief that if you set your mind to it, then you can pretty much eat anything and and taking the time to take the air out of the mind right because quite often it's the fear of items look like everyone else around me and therefore they may not accept me or or that I need to work and I need to pay the rent check and so I need to confirm and so on and so forth. I would say you to find the creativity in the energy and that's what I keep telling myself come in every day and do things a little bit better at 5.

Selecting a person come in tomorrow. I should do be better at assessment. If I'm coaching someone come in tomorrow. I want to be a little bit better than what I did yesterday. Yes. So I think I would sum it up is Twitter show me don't tell me or lie by example. So everything that you know, we sort of talked about today intensive listening to others. They sample I gave about us not putting the campaign out there but instead letting people going to come up with her own I think corporations in the past. We we got a little too

preachy with people and we sort of told them this is what we're doing. This is how we know what we have all the answers my daughter who graduated from college. Lee recently got into the workplace. I was having dinner with her one night and I said, what's the most profound thing you learned as an adult, you know being in college what surprised you the most? And she said you know, what surprised me the most is that adults really aren't as smart as you think they are and they don't have all the answers and I think that's really profound because I think as leaders and managers and and and

Executives we all grew up thinking that once you got to the Sea you had all the answers, but we realize that we don't and so the best way to connect continue to propagate the learning is to just show people your listening show them nothing is beneath me show them authenticity and transparency at and you know, I want to get better every day and there's still more that I can learn. So that's the advice I would give and I think that's the aspiration I have is to continue to do that every day. Jones. Thank you so much for the invite. Manish and thank you all so much.

Cackle comments for the website

Buy this talk

Access to the talk “AABR 2020 Panel 1: Reimagining The Purpose of a Corporation: Meeting the Needs of Today's Workforce”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Ticket

Get access to all videos “Asian American Business Roundtable”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Ticket

Interested in topic “Business Services”?

You might be interested in videos from this event

April 29 - 30, 2020
Online
14
240
b2c, covid-19, customer, ecommerce strategy, gmc, growth, marketing, martech, monetization, seo

Similar talks

Indra Nooyi
ormer Chairman and CEO at PepsiCo
+ 1 speaker
Mehmood Khan
Chief Executive Officer at Life Biosciences
+ 1 speaker
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Karen Fang
Managing Director, Global Head of Sustainable Finance at Bank of America
+ 4 speakers
Anne Lim O'Brien
Vice Chairman, Global CEO & Board Practice and Global Consumer Practice at Heidrick & Struggles
+ 4 speakers
Sharda Cherwoo
Partner, Intelligent Automation Leader at EY
+ 4 speakers
Kim Lee
Chief Financial Officer at Global Atlantic Financial Group
+ 4 speakers
James Kalani Lee
Global Chief Operating Officer, SAP Ariba and Fieldglass at SAP
+ 4 speakers
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Kathleen Navarro
Head of Talent Management & Chief Diversity Officer at New York Life
+ 4 speakers
Shital Bhatt
Managing Director at Goldman Sachs
+ 4 speakers
Hernan Celis
Commercial Banker at JPMorgan
+ 4 speakers
Jean Luna Lau
Executive Director at J.P. Morgan
+ 4 speakers
Priya Rajani
Client Strategy & Analytics Lead Analyst at Citi
+ 4 speakers
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Buy this video

Video

Access to the talk “AABR 2020 Panel 1: Reimagining The Purpose of a Corporation: Meeting the Needs of Today's Workforce”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Conference Cast

With ConferenceCast.tv, you get access to our library of the world's best conference talks.

Conference Cast
577 conferences
23287 speakers
8705 hours of content
Lisa Chang
Michael Alicea
Terri Cooper
Anish Batlaw