Asian American Business Roundtable
January 8, 2020, New York, USA
Asian American Business Roundtable
Request Q&A
Video
AABR 2020 Panel 3: Leadership Evolution: Engaging and Elevating Asian American Talent
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Add to favorites
96
I like 0
I dislike 0
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
  • Description
  • Transcript
  • Discussion

About speakers

Karen Fang
Managing Director, Global Head of Sustainable Finance at Bank of America
Anne Lim O'Brien
Vice Chairman, Global CEO & Board Practice and Global Consumer Practice at Heidrick & Struggles
Sharda Cherwoo
Partner, Intelligent Automation Leader at EY
Kim Lee
Chief Financial Officer at Global Atlantic Financial Group
James Kalani Lee
Global Chief Operating Officer, SAP Ariba and Fieldglass at SAP

Karen Fang is on the global trading management team for Fixed Income, Currencies and Commodities division and a member of the BofA ESG Committee. Formerly, Karen was the head of Americas FICC Sales and the head of Cross Asset Solutions & Strategies. She serves as a member of the firm’s Asian Leadership Council, the chair of the New Product Committee, and co-chair of the D&I Council.Prior to joining BofA, Karen was a Managing Director at Goldman Sachs where she ran the Pension, Endowment and Foundation Cross Asset Solutions Group.Karen was named one of Fortune’s “40 under 40”, and a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum (WEF) in 2015. Karen was recognized as a member of the BofA team that won American Banker’s “Most Powerful Women in Banking and Finance” team award in 2017.Karen holds a Bachelor’s degree in Economics from the University of Tokyo.

View the profile

Anne Lim O’Brien is the Vice Chairman in Heidrick & Struggles’ New York office and a member of the global Consumer Markets and CEO & Board of Directors practices. She specializes in serving consumer clients particularly at the CEO and board levels within Fortune 500 companies as well as those financially sponsored by leading private equity firms.With more than 20 years of executive search experience, Anne has partnered with clients globally to solve their strategic talent needs, bringing a deep understanding of the challenges facing consumer organizations, especially in the consumer products and retail industries. Anne started her consulting career in Singapore as an associate with Price Waterhouse focusing on Southeast Asia clients.Throughout her career, Anne has maintained a special interest in CEO succession and next generation leaders – especially in diversity talent, which includes women as well as internationally experienced executives based both in developed and developing countries.Anne has been recognized by Businessweek as one of the world’s most influential headhunters, and has served as a member of the Women’s Leadership Board at the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government.Anne holds a bachelor’s degree from New York University.

View the profile

Sharda is a strategic, global thinker with the proven ability to ask insightful questions that spark new ways of thinking and innovating. She has created a legacy at EY of creating enterprise value through building and starting-up successful businesses; successfully leading complex digital transformations; providing practical advice on existing, emerging and disruptive technologies, to reimagine the future.Sharda has had a 37-year career at EY, serving many senior leadership roles, as a CEO and a C-Suite advisor from Fortune 500 companies to start-ups. Sharda has spearheaded EY’s focus in implementing Intelligent Automation. As CEO of EY’s Global Shared Services, Sharda was an early pioneer and architect of EY’s offshoring strategy, which currently has 25,000 professionals in five countries.Sharda received the 2018 Stevie® Most Innovative Woman of the Year award; 2017 Best in Biz award for Innovator of the Year; 2017 Stevie® for Innovation of the Year. In 2019, Sharda received the Outstanding 50 Asian Americans in Business award. In 1991, Sharda was the first woman immigrant of Indian origin to make US partner in any of the “US Big 8” firms at the time.

View the profile

Kim Lee is the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of Global Atlantic and a member of the Management Committee. Kim joined Global Atlantic as a founding member. As CFO, he is responsible for oversight of the firm’s Accounting, Actuarial, Financial Planning & Analysis, and Tax departments.Prior to his current position, Kim was a Managing Director in the Goldman Sachs Reinsurance Group, the predecessor to Global Atlantic. Kim was named CFO of Global Atlantic upon its separation from Goldman Sachs in April 2013. Kim graduated from Brown University summa cum laude and phi beta kappa with a Bachelor’s of Science in Applied Mathematics-Economics.

View the profile

James Lee is currently Chief Operating Officer for SAP Ariba and Fieldglass, the global leader in procurement solution across all spend categories. The Ariba network is the world’s largest B2B marketplace, powering commerce between millions of buyers and sellers and managing trillions of dollars in annual spend. As Chief Operating Officer, James has operational oversight across the end to end business, including portfolio strategy and investment, business planning, product GTM, sales excellence, commercial model, data analytics, and talent development & learning.Previously he was Chief Operating Officer and General Manager of Sales for SAP Greater China, where he drove 13 consecutive quarters of revenue growth in the region. Since joining SAP in 2008, James has worked across product, operations, and sales in North America, EMEA and Asia. He also launched SAP’s private equity business in Asia Pacific and Japan.Prior to SAP, James worked in consulting at Hewlett Packard and McKinsey & Company.James holds a Master of Business Administration from Harvard Business School, Bachelor of Commerce from the University of British Columbia, and Diploma in Piano Performance from the Royal Conservatory of Music.He is a recipient of the 2019 Outstanding 50 Asian Americans in Business Award.

View the profile

About the talk

As organizations prepare for the generational transition of leadership and power, it is necessary to not only create better leadership development resources, but to ensure equity in access to the “ladders” leading to C-suite positions. This panel of distinguished Asian American leaders will talk about strategies to ensure inclusion of Asian American talent in the leadership pipeline and what, if any, cultural nuances should be taken into consideration for the Asian American business community. They will propose practical solutions that can be implemented to make corporate leadership more representative of employees, customers and marketplaces.

01:03 Leadership evolution

05:45 Becoming a full-time musician

10:10 Some fun facts

15:32 Real challenges

19:53 Tech space

23:50 Using the platform

27:22 Kind of the brains

31:42 Stereotypical thoughts

36:12 Mentorship

41:43 Major issue

45:17 Respective careers

49:38 Democratic debates

52:19 Board search

55:26 Film studios

Share

Alright, please put your hands together and we'll come Animo Brian and our last group of panels. What we should do all of us. I think that we probably need the energy to just be elevated just a little bit. Say hello to someone. I knew I knew everybody wanted to do something. That's right. That's the rest now. I have to get everybody attention. Thank you. Thank you. Good afternoon, everyone and welcome to the final panel at the aabr summit. It really is a privilege to be here

in a pleasure really to experience some of the amazing talent that I met this afternoon. I'll panel is that you know on leadership Evolution, they will discuss or we will discuss how we further Asian American talent and ensure Equitable access to c-suite positions. I'm & limo Brian and my firm is heidrick & struggles. We're deeply committed to diversity and inclusion Alfred's especially as we help shape uShip teams across the globe and here in the US. This is a passion topic for me and she heard me last night and I'm excited to have a panel who are equally

not only distinguish and highly qualified to share their perspectives and experiences encouragement, but they're also I think generationally speaking if I did I think they are probably at least ten years younger than I am. So I'm really pleased to be with the younger folks. They always makes me feel good and more relevant to spend some time together last week. And I trust that you've read the BIOS. I actually would love for them to provide some color on their own Heritage and their own fun fact about why they're here. Why do

feel passionately especially about this and I'd love to start with Kim at the end there. And to share a little bit about himself with us. All right. I don't my name is Kimberly. I am the Chief Financial Officer of global Atlantic. We are a life insurance company just by way of background. I was born in Canada. My background is Chinese. I moved to Hong Kong with my parents in the 80s. That's the reverse direction of where everybody was going every which way from

Hong Kong to Canada at the time. I stayed there for eight years went to school in the United States. I started my career at Goldman Sachs in 2001. How much of this is a fun fact, but I hate my first day of work was September 10th 2001. So I've seen a lot in my career app. We start Investment Banking and one of the like my the most painful decision in my career starting out was joining a group building a business. So we built a business. It was called the reinsurance business at Goldman Sachs Welton, we sold it to private investors in 2013. So Global an egg is a privately-held life

insurance company over 80 Dollars baskets in the CFO for over seven years in terms of fun facts. I live in a household with only women. I have three daughters Charlotte Russe Adam Francis for and Lennie Madeline who is two in my household. I am the plus one in the family. My wife has a much bigger public profiles and I do she's running for office string for State Assembly in lower Manhattan, which includes Chinatown as well as a Lower East Side in the financial district for all those who work in the financial district. So

app. Just seeing her do something that's different from what's really when I think about what I'm good at when I think about the things I would be afraid of doing rain for off is pretty much the top of the list of things. I'd be afraid doing just watching her just inspires me to really to do this kind of work. Thank you. Good afternoon, everyone. My name is James Lee. I work for a software company called sap as a chief operating officer for our procurement and external labor-management apart the business,

you know in my career are pretty much been in the enterprise software space since the beginning in terms of Heritage. I was born in Hawaii. So for any of you are wondering what my middle name kehlani stands for that's Hawaiian. So I let there for the first time in years of my life to move back to Taiwan where my family's from live there for eight years. Then you're just like him spend some time in Canada the parts of my schooling, you know, I've been very fortunate throughout my life to live and work in different places to

know. I've spent quite a bit of time in Europe in my career time in Singapore China, Japan and then back in us since a couple years. Now the fun fact about myself is in a big passion of mine outside of business is music take me to classical music. I trained for many years has Costco pianos made in a parallel universe. I could have become a full-time musician. Who knows but these days I spent most of my time when I play I can't really good at Disney Tunes

because I play for my two kids. I have a five-year-old daughter and a two-year-old son, and I can tell you I know every single song from Frozen one and and Frozen to so I'm really proud of that. Always have a backup plan. Hi, good afternoon. Thank you for having us on stage today. And it's a pleasure to be here. My name is Karen Fang and I run global cross-asset trading at Bank of America and I can explain to you if that doesn't sound straightforward Pepe's academies across all the different

products that we offer in global fixed-income currencies and commodities around the training business, which makes me one of the makes me the only woman on the global trading management team, which I think I do think we have a lot of work to do in sales and trading about some things but very quickly by Bob my background is that I was boring. Mainland China it was boring a city called sujeo, which is very close to Shanghai. I was born and raised there until I was 17 years old. I went to Japan. I got into University of Tokyo after you know how they study Japanese for 2

months and had to take the college entrance exam as I as I now say that's probably the only cool thing I've ever done. My life and haven't really been able to top that learn Japanese in 2 months ago. That was pretty cool. So since then has been so do you know going to new resort Tokyo graduating started with Merrill Lynch in Tokyo moved to London for a few years that moved to the states for thinking 2017 years ago. That definitely makes me a call if I New Yorker. I also have a two and a half year old daughter and 4 and 1/2 year

old son. She's obsessed with Let It Go Frozen. So I'm definitely have to invite you over to my house for dinner. So I was actually doing a lot of structuring a starting to Road of trading and moving to sales and structuring and kind of move back to trading and do all kinds of different things and very passionate about my job, but it was a very passionate about d&i and Mom the Asian-American Azaria won the Asian Enterprise Council for Bank of America. I'm on the global. Yes G committee. So you can you can tell my passion there in addition to my job and my family. So

again, thank you for having me. Thank you. I'm up short of the Shibuya. So glad to be here and I and I think you and I are the same generation that I have quite sure we are I grew up in India, I grew up in India and arranged marriage at the age of 17 and we've been married for three years now so you can simple math simple math and and I've been here move to the US at 18th, and he might my mother was pretty wise. I think what she felt is so pretty good student did pretty well in school and stuff. So she probably figured we're a strategic for me to get married when she was going to

send me here as a single person back, you know, and I came here in 77 and So I got married there and feel we knew each other's families. And you know, we've been married since I have a wonderful husband. I was telling someone a few stories about him about he's sort of how he's been probably one of those silent Mentor sponsors behind the scenes. That is probably made me what I am today. I never tell that to him in the room because I do for whatever reason why I joined

Ernst & Young and 82. So I've been there 37 years. I've been a partner for about twenty eight years in The Firm of a man of the first woman partner and their Stamford office. I think it was the first woman of Indian origin of the big 8 from his back and I made partner 20-plus years ago. And you know, it's what's been very interesting in a fun fact. I can't think of too many you don't have children. So I don't understand any of this Frozen stuff at all. I have no idea what you're talking about. But the fun facts really

was is when I first came to the US. I was in Atlanta to JFK. They were cars like going at 60 miles per hour at never seen that's what a speed in my life going up in Calcutta India. And the first thing that came to my mind was I'll never be able to drive in this country never right. I just thought I'd died on the highway, right? He was just sort of this Mortal fear and scared scared and you think about it if you land in Connecticut, and if you cannot drive you can't do anything you're done, right? You're absolutely

done. And so the first year was spent just working in a grocery store. I think that is my other prestigious that was walking distance from our apartment. So that was my first job, but the fun fact was you. My my regular I think the minimum wage back then was Adele radio 7 + r and so was sweeping the floors and Someone walked over to me and asked me like where is the Bounty right? And I'm like what it is. She and I just are landed from India few months ago. Right? No, no contact still contacts at all. I've no idea what

Sharman was but found he was I've never seen any of this stuff before so so it was it was quite a learning experience of my my thing was you know, I'm going to start studying these weekly Flyers. There's no internet there was nothing right. So I was like what the prices and I wondered about things like why is the nickel larger than a dime and it's twice though. It was half the little what happened by whatever the back something was so I hate you don't you know that I think what was the biggest thing that I realized over time is how important it is to have context how important

it is to sort of have that I was felt. Like I was like a child growing up not knowing what the currency look like not knowing the brands speak English English, but not really understanding what people say. And right and so that whole learning. I mean I V8 with hands and India you do if you wash your hands regularly and you ate with your hands, right? So what would mortally scared me is my interview with the various people once I get all got out of college was Emma go to lunch and is being a spoon or Fork. What am I going to order? Because if there's a lot of spoon and fork to be had

and I'd learn but I wasn't quite Adept at it in a few years, right? So I used to order sandwiches play easier because you can eat a sandwich of the hand. You don't have to even think about and if you think about the journeys of it all gone through over our lives where we where we haven't had that sort of luxury of context and maybe you've come a long way. You know, I I just feel you know, we all should start already think about about what we've baby. Will Ben and feel hugely proud. Hugely proud of what we will dance so, you know, I am that's what Where

my mind's at Charlotte? Thank you. I wanted to do this because there is a very important aspect of our topic elevating Asian American talent. We all came from somewhere which is modest in very very likely and even if it wasn't modest we all had to go through is something learning. I know I was born and raised in Singapore. I've been here for 35 years. When I first came I thought G I got I spoke with wings English. Nobody understood me cuz I was speaking three times as fast as I'm speaking right now. So we all have We all

came from somewhere into especially New York but into this country. So the elevating of Asian American talent is really interesting and I wanted to be sure you had a baseline on each ball panelists and Kim. I'm I live with three boys including my husband and I have and I have a husband who is a full-time father and for our generation that was pretty bold, but then you know, he says go out there every home the bank and then I Married An American what can I say? So let's jump right into the the the topic of the topic

which is, you know, each of your perspectives. I think he has G has really elevated the conversation on d&i to a degree that is really critical today in corporations. And we have to build in a bath to break the stereotypes. We have to break into the thinking that is going to help us lay out this pipeline. So for each of us as I would love to hear your point of view on what are the challenges that you think effacing organizations today that are maybe the biggest and the toughest to fix. What

are they? And how do we do that? How do we fix it Karen? Would you like to start? Yeah. Sorry to give me the lake. So I'm starting a couple of things that really presents real challenges. The first thing is awareness. So we didn't actually set up. I think I have some colleagues here from the bank that that was you know, what that never runs are Asian leadership Network. It's kind of more of a grassroot and Bottoms Up organization has been with in the bank for a long time, but you think of other where and it from the top and it's at the board level in the c-suite level and sometimes very

senior client. They're not aware that there is a problem about the representation of senior Asian and seeing the very very top of the organization. So I think I wearing this is definitely lacking we didn't set up our enterprise-level Asian Leadership Council until a year ago which which I have now, Part of that's across divisional Council that sponsor by c-suite members. So not that awareness has finally bubbled up. No thanks to the Asian Vision Works jobs at work and a lot of community members work that where it is has now been achieved and now we

have a solution which is okay. We're going to have a c-suite sponsored enterprise-level Council. We're going to drive metrics and it sounds boring but I think she was Asians that the numbers are really good because now you can actually measure progress. I can make it very tangible very measurable. So that's one to his I think you know, I don't have to make the distinction between mentorship and sponsorship anymore because I think that concept has been well understood but again the top-down sponsorship of someone who's very senior who has the reach-in organization the

capacity to make things happen, but that person were for that group of people to sponsor. emerging Talent emerging leaders and actually making their that their own no soda part of their mandate and part of their goal to really make this happen increase our penetration at the c-suite of Asian Americans and asian-americans Asian leaders in general and to really make that racial go higher may we see a lot of drop after we do typically Investment Bank Saint Elizabeth's associate vice-president directors managing director who have a lot of entry-level

representation and maybe to the vice president level, but it really drop stop a director in managing director level and you look at functions the functions that's quantitative risk based or a quan spaced fill with Asians, but when you look at Investment Banking and sales and trading and you know other client facing for online jobs that again that representation racial comes down, So I think that's where we have to be honest in Gillette really honest about the issue be aware of the issue do something about it and really making very senior members of the organization

Barry accountable for driving metrics and making measurable progress. He's otherwise, it's just all talk. So I think those are teens that I I have observed agree with you more, you know it in my opinion that the biggest challenge that we face is that the de pesame were stifling Innovation because we are not fully embracing diversity in my opinion diversity is in a nice to have but necessary to move the business forward and Os Asian Americans as a group just like every other group we

come with artistic background way of thinking and we come up with a lot of different new ideas start different from you know, what some of the other crew switch come with To not have that boys at the Executive Suite I think it's quite damaging in terms of just how much Innovation and new ideas that you can get. Right. So I think you know you were talking a little bit about the statistics in the banking world, you know in the tech world. We have a disproportionately high percentage of Asian Americans in entry-level and mid-level

jobs, especially when it has to do with your product development engineering but when you look across Senior Management executive management, there's a disproportionately low percentage of Asian Americans being presented are you know, that's a bit of egg nigma in my opinion because I absolutely think in the tech space with all the industries that Asian Americans will half a lot to contribute. So I think that's certainly one of the challenges the Second Challenge dicey. I feel that the the definition of leadership or you know, what it takes to get

to the c-suite is rather narrowly defined in the North American contacts. If there are certain traits characteristics. I'm sure we'll get into later on and are very North America Centric and you know as I've had the opportunity to work and live in other parts of the world leadership styles really differ from one region to another there isn't one that dominates right and two Arachnia teacher promote Asian Americans into the sea Sweeney or together more opportunities. I think we need to start by revisiting

how we define leadership. And what are the criteria that go in to red? And what is a process that we take to evaluate leadership? It's not meant to say it's not an easy problem for us this all right, if it already the problem, we would have already solved it when I give you an example when I say I do a lot of hiring of senior Finance Executives at my company and I asked for divorce late singer from the recruiter whether it's internal or external it's a struggle to women and you

can't just all this by making sure you get diverse lace and higher higher diverse candidate. That's a part of it doesn't exist yet to go one level down or two levels down it if you can like if if the entry levels are full of Asians women people of color if they're all in accounting or orc wants like it's the job of the corporation to move them around moving sideways and move them up and that's where the sponsorship comes in right so you want You're cute. You want to

work with your company your HR your leaders to promote this not for just this next promotion around cuz you know what you're going to choose with whatever available candid is this round to three or four around the head and then we're all leaders in some fashion or company. That's why I that's why we're here. We should bring we should bring people with us and don't bring one for one person. You need to bring at least two and then you need to teach the people you're sponsoring to bring people with them. That's that's the only way we can lift as a group together.

Yeah, that's a huge point. I think one of the things I mean, there's lots of things that companies are doing and they've been we've been on this journey for techies writing and the needle hasn't moved. How many on the board side right the Asian numbers on Independent board numbers. What is a 3% yet? But they told me things and a half percent right to the average is still around for Rite Aid in the Asian population being about 6% of the US so it's a huge butt but this thing out that he what you what you just said getting is we have to figure out a better way to

pull each other along and and we don't have to wait till I'm 37 years of the firm, right? We in our each other you're one year in The Firm 2 years in the front field. We have more power than we think to pull people off. To recommend people to get people hired obviously, how do I qualify for? That's a baseline, right? You have to give people more of a Johnson every night. You know, it's a journey That Never Ends, but I'll take much of my time is spent in using my platform to try and connect people with people

and I know a lot of people around a table outside and and I am just getting people connected and being getting them at the spot and giving them the chance and then obviously it's theirs but the one thing that I'll tell you the story. This is what about my husband again, but it's very interesting because it takes a fair amount of Courage is not really easy to feel like you belong all the time, right because there is no difference. Is there things you think differently whether it's your man woman different place is all kinds of Dynamics write this was 15 or so years

ago, right? We had we had a new managing partner that was brought in from Minneapolis Jim Charlie into the New York office to manage the New York office. Right? So we had Tom Hudgins was retiring Jim Turley was brought in to manage the New York office now in New York office and he's already come from if somebody was brought in from our Minneapolis office. He was managing Minneapolis office. He came here. And my husband asking the next question thing. When is Phil laskoviy retiring of Alaska? It was a car in German. I just for last waiver time so I don't think he's a

couple years out. And the next thing you tells me is Jim truly has been brought in. To take the last of his job and this this was two or three years later that is actually happened so that he tells me this and then he's precedes very quickly say and I was already a partner right? I was pregnant for number two years. I think I'd like you to go and meet Jim Curley and just go meet him about Southern Cross at 4 months and he kept us through you have to get on this calendar and Needham, right? And so finally I like I have to do this just check that box and

got on this on Jim's calendar and met up with him a tremendous. You know, you can you feel like it or he's like a friend. I don't feel like he was a long story short that thing 15 years ago than every quarter. We should catch up every quarter. And so every quarter for 15 years. I was in whatever till he retired. I was in his office and he just talked about all kinds of these anything. There's no formal. Agenda. I wasn't like I was making the ass but that was the other thing. I probably could

have made asked that I never did but but the point is that's what's up the relationship up and that I think the lesson for me and that is we have to be able to get out of our thing and make connections and reach out to people that we think might not be as approachable and makeup and it's a cup of coffee where there's some connection that has to be your I've always said this to everybody is like you can be Albert Einstein and you will fail if people don't want you to succeed you have to have people around you the ecosystem and wants you to succeed. You have two people that want you

to succeed if people don't want you to succeed then matter. It doesn't matter. What kind of brains you might have. You might be an Einstein so that the point is you have to say Around how you find those connections and then be able to either to pick invite someone over for dinner or something or coffee that has to be a regular part of everything is at the end of the day people who are people who they feel like they trust and they can or they promote people or they pull people of them opportunities. They think of them that has to be the core of a person's life other than the United Nation

are not early on and I think for us it becomes even more important to do that is really find his riches and be 10 to 5. Bridges with other Indians are other Asians, whatever else a lot more we have to find the non easy route. So to me that's sort of been the month are we have to be able to that I suspect a lot of what I've been able to do. All these years is because of being pushed etcetera and finding those little Bridges and constantly being, you know, you have 280,000 people around the world at 90% but the point is being finding those little connections.

Inside and your peer group to the one group that you can never never never forget. Not only the people who work for you is your peer group because the peer group the other ones you competing with and you don't beat me talk to my boss has a lot so I can press that bosses. But you have to have peer groups that are friends and that is critically important because you could be undermined by quickly if they're not ready for a real good friends of yours a very informal networks.

And there's a lot that can be said about setting the tone at the top. You know, sometimes I always a specific culture issue. Is it a structure issue? Is it an accessibility issue? Is it an availability issue supply and demand of it or is just an awareness issue? I do think that we all have to give really really careful thinking. Around what it is. The each of our organizations are facing. What do we have? And how do we Elevate that Talent? How many of you were at the last Summit last two Summits last Summit last two Summits? Okay. Great.

Thank you very much the new majority and I think that was something that John was coined phrase in the last Summit that reflects the whole diversity movement and how in time maybe in 2030 that will be the new majority. And so when we think about today 2020 the pipeline has to be built. So whose responsibility is it? How do you see it maybe from your own experiences who is responsible for making sure this pipeline is probably laid out Karen. I see you nodding away.

I do think it's all stakeholders. I don't think it's one particular group. I think obviously within the organization as we can all agree with short of more you have to build Bridges with the same race, and then you have to build Bridges with really all Races all genders and all different city peers and bosses and subordinates. You have to build the meaning phone that works and I do think it's so internally, I think the stakeholders really matter. I think across your client supply chain, you know those, you know, so that when you think about the ecosystem, I think those stakeholders obvious a

matter and then I think it's very important you having neighbors. I view ABC as an enabler organization of you heidrick struggles as a neighbor or university Talent identification, you know, identifying organization. I think all of those in neighboring enabling organizations are equally important to me how you place c-suite how your place board members. I just give a tremendous amount of visibility to the talent. That's Going our community and I think the more success follows success when people see that when the people see that level of Gravitas and visibility and people automatically

assume that we have a lot more to offer then maybe we'll be historically have been given credit for and I think the stereotypical and functions that Asians tend to be associated with again does pipeline building of eating other non-stereotypical functions? I think my responsibility lies on all of our shoulders. James and Kim perhaps perhaps you could tell us your own view around what can the individual do to own that responsibility because I think you know, you don't want to go into a mode of learned helplessness. We learned it from actually the other diversity

groups that are ahead of us because the Asian Americans are probably as Julie would say the lost the Lost diversity group. What can the individual do to take responsibility for your own future? I think the most important thing in Ennis is a word that can use earlier. It's awareness but it's self-awareness. I mean, I don't even need to ask everybody. You've all been in the room. You felt you felt like you didn't belong you felt like you were placed in a roll whether that was your role or not. We've all had that experience. I think the

one thing I was just like a light in my head is like you have to use the tools you had use your eyes and use your you can see what's going on in a room rights do in if you're in a company there are written rules. Are you have your HR policies your promotion criteria, but there are Unwritten. There's There are rules that people automatically play in any room. That's the man's plan that person that's always talking over a woman. There's a yes man. Usually at the man there's the Asian person whether you stay. He's not even if they're not the Qwaser ass to hey, can you can you

do the math? Your eyes are open in your ears of yours. If you can see it happening, then you have a choice, right? So we're talking about you know, making that extra connection networking going back against them and play or I'm not your client or I'm going to speak first. Normally, I don't see first because if we don't speak first and we'll speak when spoken to it's your choice. We don't have to you don't have to shed our cultural heritage. Right if we're if we were brought up we humble brought up respectful when the goal is not to act like

like a white man to 60 or that is not what we want succeed if we work cuz nobody will treat us like that. But if you know what's going on around you if you can see that you can see the institutional scaffolding around then you can then you can make a difference every situation is going to be different. But what if you can see it then you can do so you can choose what you want to do if you have the right relationship with your leader your boss you can Help him or her be more aware. That's how you Altima can change advice on what you can do today.

It's more if you go on with your eyes open and your ears off and you really can see what's really going on. I just want one more thing. It's not quite as little bit. Like what the hell this is the role people expect me to be there. And if you're mad you can do something about it. And by the way again, like we don't want to speak out we don't want to do you want you don't want to lead when you look around the room like if I'm a little bit mad and I actually in this Tramp I should feel a

little more powerful little stronger. So if your little mad and if you want more power, then you can do the things that are I know I heard you to guess it's hard for me to do. I know it's hard for all of us to do so, that's what we can do. It's true do something from Eleanor Roosevelt and I wake up in the morning. Go. What is the one thing you don't want to do? What what's one thing you fear doing? Do it challenge yourself? In fact, I don't I'm not very good at

moderating and John said you going to moderate. I'm like, alright, I'll moderate but so, you know, you are James. I know you want to share something. Shut up. My advice for people who are in positions of power to recruit for leadership positions, you know, it goes back to what I was saying earlier. It's about mentorship but also sponsorship write the mentorship is about actively working with Asian Americans in your organization's especially those were earlier on your career to role model for them by to show them a career path and you know

to inspire them. I think that's very important but that in itself is not going to be sufficient. You have to take the extra step of sponsorship and difference between sponsorship in mentorship is sponsorship. You're actively going out there. Are you putting maybe you're taking some rest you're putting your your own reputation to line to go out there and say Hey, you know, I believe in someone so I want to give this person an opportunity right to rise through the ranks and I'm going to personally work with this person to nurture him or her to ensure that this person is successful. I

think there isn't enough of that going around. I think it's very important now on the flipside my advice to individuals who are looking to you. No breaks through the ranks. This is how I think about things myself. There are certain things for me. Non-negotiables part of it is maybe my culture my Heritage the way I think about things, you know, my moral compass Etc. No matter what the situation is. I'm just unwilling to break those things and change but then there are

things that I see as adaptability topic right the way you communicate with others the way you position yourself the way you manage confrontation. These are things that can be learned. Right and sometimes I care in corporations were people say Hey, you know that goes against my culture. You know, I'm Asian and can't do that while I was only partially true right there certain things at the Asian you need not change and you should really work to your strength, but then there are other things that have nothing to do about being an Asian their skills that we pick up

along the way. And my advice to especially the younger generation is to think about what those adaptability topics are and how you can shape him or herself to become more effective leaders. The whole balance at Rauch referred to earlier about being modest and at the same time being confident so should I know you want you want to share on that one. Kim said earlier again you do I ask my husband one-time thing. What would you have done differently and your career that you fear to read it back again? And what would you've done to flee? And he said something that I can

shut off 8 so so true. He said, you know, I would have spent more time after work at when he was a is a traitor and you know the holy proud man and in in a trade on the trading floor. This is a long time ago and he said I would have spent more time after work when folks used to ask me. You don't want let's just go out for a beer or whatever else and I always chose to go home right always chose to go and I rarely ever went and hung out with the boys after work and he said you don't have any happens is the you find out. What really goes on inside the

context and you know, who knows who and what's really going on, you know when you're in at 9 to 5 or so busy with work and everything else. None of that stuff is transparent have no idea and and when you are entering a setting where people are a lot more open and they share things share things that are Peta personal or going through a mine and that post I posted a soda over a beer or whatever our coffee wine. Whatever else it is. You learn a lot more about in that time that gives you a lot more context about what you would u r e d you to

understand the you have your antennas up about what's really going on understand politics a lot better understand people a lot better MN of those very well could be your something comes up and that person you are the end the bar with that you just had a beer that got to know you that wasn't a different floor might have an opening that gives you a break on something that you may Never have gotten the break on you know, just do something because you were you were visible you were there. So I mean to me it's so that again it's about connecting with people and being able to be you don't

find that extra time to take to get to know him because all human beings. I don't have the best of intent. There's just no one that doesn't it just a matter of getting to know people and also opening yourself up. I think I just found out early on in my life. I had a big Shield I wouldn't talk about things that were important to me. Most people you don't didn't even know what the vale was and I never even to be quiet nothing right for the first 25 years ago. He why because I even talked about was a big thing for us and we never talked about it and end in at work. But until

it was a big thing that I had set up an artificial ones people got to know. Well, do you know tomorrow is the volume is it between here and I used to get start getting notes from people Americans. Hey, Happy Diwali in this opening yourself up also and Enable to be to share stuff that that you know that that you might otherwise not chair. So I think you're absolutely right. Every one of our panelists that I think is Asian Americans Asian mother coming out for me. I think we will have such a major issue with control. We want to make sure

everything gets done exactly the way win fishnet. So in the organization context, well go out with the boys. Okay, maybe I won't say anything. Maybe I will and I will come in the next day. What can I say? What can't I say, so I think there are few points here awareness and adaptability which brought up I think you talk about the willingness to be vulnerable. I think the vulnerability keys. I'm still learning it because the control person and you will never want to show everything. I think it's goes with success and confidence it comes with

experience. Comes with really all of us. I bet a subject subject matter experts and if we go into the world, we need to broaden that subject matter expertise into something that goes up on the leadership scale goes up on the communication capability and broadening your network over dinner last night. We talked about something which I would love to share because I think some of us felt. Oh my gosh it to me. It was a no-brainer because it happened to me, but I was watching it and not to have a gray sponsor in a

mentor in our chairman. When I first came from Singapore really green, you know, just so green. Really fresh face and he's the one who said stop talking so fast, but he also was a great role model for me to look up at what really made him. So successful that he was named. He was named record of the century name is Jerry roach bless us all but he did one thing for me a few things but one is always be the best at what you do, but she's the one thing that I learned and realized that as an Asian and maybe just as a woman executive that I

really appreciate he's he's such a sociable person very appropriately sociable, but a lot of the times when we walk into the room for a major meeting his first instinct was to connect with the next person and what do they talk about nothing about the business of the business it was an all-around. Who are you you know, where where'd you go to school for Uconnect if we would you call? You left your vacation all the things that our life experiences so that the the fact is I think we're all so wrapped up in

trying to be great at what we do. We don't give enough time is like a muscle that you could have one exercise, you know, you've got great muscles in one hand unless exercise does muscle. Let's go to make sure we get enough time to balance all cells and B total people real people people that other than Asian Americans can connect with and we can connect with that because at the end of the day, we're all just human beings and sometimes being Asian-American me get in the way of that because we see ourselves this that and we forget it would just another human being so that's

my wonderful thing Karen. I know that you would Notting away. So did you want to share on that point? I think something down on me as I was listening to all of you and I actually so it's quite interesting to talk about this. And I bet all of you have felt that way you wanted to succeed. Do you want to be recognized and you and your respective careers? You probably want to say I'm really good at that right? I'm the best at what I can be in doing this and don't don't give it to me because I'm I can talk now from my own personal Spears still promote me because

I'm a woman don't promote me because I'm Asian American don't promote me because because I'm like in check three boxes in your dni form or something like that and don't promote me because whatever makes you look good on me because I could promote me because I know my I know my stuff and you know, I can deliver value. So we wanted them. To be gender-blind and race-blind and we wanted them to be. Like objective and we almost wanted that because of our pride of our educational background our ego or

whatever our values and ethics then we are that good. Let me be promoted for my own merits not because of all these other labels. I hated labels I hated label is like your Chinese your you went to Japan and you were Japan and you know, whatever Japanese raise you went to England and you have all these labels in your woman and your trailer or are you just saying that I hate labels just promote me because I'm good. So we wanted them to be gender race blind. We almost wanted them to be like nandi and I sensitive but now we're sort of talking to the reverse where they

Embrace this and I should think that I think the decade now it's a new decade and send you not just a New Year's and you decorate a new century all that stuff like you as you believe people should embrace that individuality the diversity we should embrace we should be very proud of the fan. That we are Asians and where women and wear whatever that we are in the sexual privacy. No preferences and many different axes that now is called as diversity Fabric and we have to embrace that so we go from being blind and objective and all that stuff to now actually using

that to our advantage and very personal fact about my parents were College professors and my brother, you know, I'm the black sheep. My brother is a college professor in the states. Then he is he is gay, right. He doesn't really want to come out and he obviously come out like gradually to family and part of his close friends and that he is still not embracing his individuality and I'm very proud of the fact he is a professor in one of the toughest objects at American University, but I I used to joke with them. I say if you told the faculty that you are gay you

probably would have learned Tender Years faster. I want to learn this on my own married and I'm going to do this. I'm so proud of him for see you still made it when he was super young, but the fact that I still think a lot of us doing brace that we are not proud of all these labels and maybe now it's a no time to turn it on its head and I should embrace that and using that to our advantage and actually really helping our fellow Americans Asian Americans are Asians. So I think in a lot of for so many years I think I wanted people to be blind about this the labels and now I am very proud of

it. Well spoken well spoken and I would love to open the stop by Sita 5 minutes signal so we have room for a few questions, please I left open this up to the audience. Yes, thanks for the conversation. So it's great to see Asians Americans are represented pretty well and final subject, but I'm curious to ask you what about places? We are under-represented like Chapel Hill or law enforcement or sports leagues or even certain place where I feel that we can improve on in any other discussion on that for the start before we look at Archie much as well.

I was hoping the someone in the panel would volunteer for that. I think Emma will do it. One thing one thing you see when you think you've seen in the latest Democratic debates has two days ago. There were three Asian Americans on stage. Right and the next one they will be zero so they're closed but they're still this bamboo ceiling but there's one of each. There's one maybe two of each in the population. There are enough so that the way long-term ultimately is to encourage people to get involved. So we talked about

supporting each other. It's also getting involved in your community support in your community part of that is ultimately getting involved in many organizations being an activist being in politics. If you if you get on the ground level now a generation later, and it's going to be a generation later. Be at least decades later before that's that's the rising different issues. And the corporation would have lots of people in the bottom of the triangle very few at the top. There's nobody at the bottom of the triangle to the kind of things. We need to focus

on and encourage and help and donate and raise money and support. Thank you Kim. I think it's an acceptance issue. I think socially we might be behind because a lot of our struggles are all related to Performance and Rewards. You know, I think that if we brought an hour our scope and I were at my side and help others in The Firm or known as Asian do that in the acceptance level is there then maybe we'll have more people you like to do that. I have room for one or two more questions. I know I'm I'm standing between you and the and the dreams and Michael Chad, so

Hi, I'm a member of the Asian American journal Association. I've been covering diversity many many years and it's Segway from what you're saying in this gentleman said over the years. I've wondered or felt that too for Asian Americans to advance. We have to advance and entertainment and political office social media. Now own the means of production fight racism at all levels soda vs. Except Vivaldi's I found over the years I felt for Americans and so many Americans get their information from entertainment that entertainment in social media is really critically important. How do you feel

about investing in movies and Netflix and programs and entertainment that emphasized and promote asian-americans, you know beyond awkwafina. If any of you would like to respond, otherwise, I'll jump right in just an interest of time. I've had the great Fortune of walking on very important port search for El Sayed and please keep this with discretion Brewery. They wanted us at Barbary to bring in a cultural event because they were going from luxury Heritage

to Lobster contemporary so is streetwear and with streetwear comes the the need to really know what goes on at street level and in the process of doing that I met so many diverse two candidates and the ones that I met were in the meeting and change the world and I'll placement was at the end of the day Co ORD retired CEO of like a Black Entertainment TV Debbie Lee but here's what I learned. There's definitely a great movement at Netflix at all, the all the media companies One content and what I'm hearing the produces do and how their Thinking about it is

content as in from a different standpoint. They are going to create programs and films that really relate right across the board, even though they're very athletically driven. So fresh off the boat, for example, it's so relatable or black panther the heroes is that true. So relatable even to her total brought American audience crazy Rich Asians, you know, I related to that cuz I'm from Singapore but they have all these Concepts. I mean put crazy Rich Asians a girlfriend. I will talk and she is really dating someone

who is a very accomplished investment banker, you know, Jewish descent but very New York and you can you get a picture. I hate stereotyping but she's like, oh my gosh, you know those That's like West Palm Beach and New York. And the important thing to know is it doesn't matter. It almost is an advantage that we have a cause of our own but whatever we do. We need to make it relatable on a broader level. So I would say the meeting and say Manuel is coming right around that they've done it with a lot of

African-American series. And now they've gone right through to asian-americans the Latina did well, you know, they have their own media channels. So I hope that is a little bit of a response not quite on and maybe I'll just add to what you said. I think media and entertainment industry and what really drives the taste of meat and entertainment on I'm by no means an expert on this right. It's about viewership by day. They will invest in the genres or the type of cat. Earned them the big bucks in

the box office. And you know, I I feel pretty optimistic about how things are progressing, you know coinciding with the rights of China and all the consumerism in the Chinese market being, you know, what the largest entertainment Industries outside North America. You can see more more film studios, especially if you look at legendary pictures, which is owned by Wanda group placing very Kyros of you know, international movie star started by in a few know Asian actors and actresses and I don't think that they're doing that for the out the goodness of their hearts they doing

that because they can drive viewership in the mainland China Market by so As long as we continue to do go out and support the beat entertainment in street with our wallets, right and speak with our wallets. We will start to see more changes. Can I think you're touched upon the fancy aspect of it. So, obviously if I'm going to yes G financing standpoint, just like now we focus on more SME Phineas, and we women entrepreneurs when you look at ESG and go for media and entertainment weather is looking at film, you know, where house lies where there's

looking securitization ABS. A lot of that actually is emphasis has been given on the different filters. You can apply whether it's Talent whether it's directorship weather is actually a no-sew dress wool market. I do think those financing will receive its rightful market share if you well with it, right? Yes, you can go an extra penetrating Asian market. I think we're a really flat out of time Mike over to you. Thank you everyone. Please give a hand to the panelist. Thank you.

Cackle comments for the website

Buy this talk

Access to the talk “AABR 2020 Panel 3: Leadership Evolution: Engaging and Elevating Asian American Talent”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Ticket

Get access to all videos “Asian American Business Roundtable”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Ticket

Interested in topic “Business Services”?

You might be interested in videos from this event

April 29 - 30, 2020
Online
14
240
b2c, covid-19, customer, ecommerce strategy, gmc, growth, marketing, martech, monetization, seo

Similar talks

Kathleen Navarro
Head of Talent Management & Chief Diversity Officer at New York Life
+ 4 speakers
Shital Bhatt
Managing Director at Goldman Sachs
+ 4 speakers
Hernan Celis
Commercial Banker at JPMorgan
+ 4 speakers
Jean Luna Lau
Executive Director at J.P. Morgan
+ 4 speakers
Priya Rajani
Client Strategy & Analytics Lead Analyst at Citi
+ 4 speakers
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Lisa Chang
Chief People Officer at The Coca-Cola Company
+ 3 speakers
Michael Alicea
Global Chief Human Resources Officer at Nielsen
+ 3 speakers
Terri Cooper
Chief Inclusion Officer at Deloitte
+ 3 speakers
Anish Batlaw
Operating Partner at General Atlantic
+ 3 speakers
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Indra Nooyi
ormer Chairman and CEO at PepsiCo
+ 1 speaker
Mehmood Khan
Chief Executive Officer at Life Biosciences
+ 1 speaker
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Buy this video

Video

Access to the talk “AABR 2020 Panel 3: Leadership Evolution: Engaging and Elevating Asian American Talent”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Conference Cast

With ConferenceCast.tv, you get access to our library of the world's best conference talks.

Conference Cast
577 conferences
23287 speakers
8705 hours of content
Karen Fang
Anne Lim O'Brien
Sharda Cherwoo
Kim Lee
James Kalani Lee