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Can VR Create Real Change? | SXSW 2021

Fifer Garbesi
Emerging Formats Producer at YouTube
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SXSW 2021
March 16, 2021, Online, Austin, USA
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Can VR Create Real Change? | SXSW 2021
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About speakers

Fifer Garbesi
Emerging Formats Producer at YouTube
Gabo Arora
Founder & CEO at Lightshed
Tiffany Kieran
Director of XR Programming + Partnerships at EarthxFilm
Nonny de la Peña
CEO and Founder at Emblematic Group

Experienced in leading cross-functional teams in AR/VR development, optimizing programs for efficiency and quality, and ideating interactive 3D solutions. Expertise building strong client relationships and guiding brands in the adoption of emerging formats and technologies. Garbesi’s work screened at Cannes, Tribeca, and The Nobel Peace Prize ceremony and was awarded a Cannes Lion.

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Heralded by the LA times as "game-changing" and "transcending all the typical barriers of rectangular cinema", Gabo Arora's widely acclaimed virtual reality documentaries have all premiered as official selections at major film festivals around the world. Gabo is an award-winning immersive artist, filmmaker and Founder/Creative Director of LightShed, a storytelling, technology and research studio collaborating with the industry’s leading creative pioneers and entrepreneurs focused exclusively on emerging technologies currently known as VR, AR and AI. He is also a professor at Johns Hopkins University, where he designed, leads and is the Founding Director of the new Immersive Storytelling and Emerging Technologies (ISET) program and lab. Formerly, he was a Senior Economic Policy Advisor for Secretary General Ban Ki-moon; a UN diplomat with extensive field experience in disaster and conflict zones; and the United Nations' first-ever Creative Director where he founded UNVR - a division of the UN focused on virtual reality initiatives and campaigns.

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Nonny de la Peña is regarded as one of the most influential pioneers in virtual and augmented reality and was recently named WSJ Technology Innovator of the Year. A Wired Magazine #MakeTechHuman Agent of Change, she has been called “The Godmother of Virtual Reality” by Engadget and The Guardian. Additionally, Fast Company named her “One of the People Who Made the World More Creative” and CNET’s 20 Most Influential Latinos in Tech for her pioneering work in immersive storytelling. As CEO of Emblematic Group, she leads the company in creating cutting edge technologies to not only tell stories that create intense, empathic engagement. Her latest endeavor, REACH.Love, is a no-code WebXR platform that intends to empower anyone to create and distribute AR/VR stories straight in the browser.

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About the talk

“VR for Good”, “the Empathy Machine”, “Story living”... VR has gotten quite a reputation for creating impact. But does the hype really add up? We are at a pivotal moment in history, with socio-political division at an all-time high and less than a decade left to prevent climate crisis. Could creating virtual realities actually help move us towards a better tomorrow? Join top VR for Good creators and curators as they dig into the impacts of this medium, putting real change and direct action front and center. We will tackle three difficult questions that get to the heart of this issue.

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Thank you for joining us. My name is Pfeiffer car BC and I'm an immersive media producer and director over the past year. I kept being confronted with this question, can be our create real change with wildfires out of control in California, pandemic Division, and the threat to our democracy. I just kept wondering what kind of world is my work. Creating, what kind of world do I want to create? So today, I want to introduce you to three Visionaries who have pioneered virtual reality emphasize impact and do groundbreaking work to ensure. This medium has a positive effect on people and

the planet. First of all, Nonny De La Pena. The Godmother as, ER, I am. Thank you so much for having me in 4, coming to watch and I really appreciate. Entire team is helped by Southwest for their efforts to make the same work. So just as a ward of background, I came from, I have worked on this cover story for Newsweek magazine and that cover piece. Really was about. How do we put you on seeing, you know, to text experiencing, what was going on across the nation Emily? When I worked on. Sooner or

later, we just know. We called Cinema verite, where we tried to record live moment, and he wants him with real-world, wasn't folding in front of you. I took all those ideas myself, the code. I was a lot of help again to make pieces. The first. I think, I think most people know is I made a virtual Festival version of Guantanamo Bay alongside show artist awhile. And I came from a section on one of those documentary films, we learned a lot about Guantanamo Bay prison and felt that it wasn't really being Percentage. I'm you couldn't get there during was couldn't get

there, no one could get there. So, we wanted to make a version that people could be there and I'm just down, is going on in this is in contrast to real but inaccessible prison camp, didn't you listen to class? You will see, which was making a web documentary, essentially about hunger and the 2008 downturn that along with an intern, we started recording audio to Banks. I wanted to use Virtual Reality to put people on seeing during a real incident. Okay, he's having a seizure. Okay, and that incredible audio of a man with diabetes, never getting to food, his blood sugar

dropped too low and claps into a diabetic coma and we decided to make a piece that put you at that moment. When he was there. I have to say, I have to say that, like, it was terrible back then, but apparently, The heads of the national Regional food bank for saying that the hunger in America right now is way worse. I think it's piece. Still has relevant. But you know, my attempt to do this was telling her bucks, my own money. This is what we came up with hunger in LA and even though it was had plenty of drunkenness and problems. It was still powerful bear witness to what was going on. And

I didn't open the Sundance Film Festival, became the very first BRP stair and my career. Tell assistant, we made all kinds of stuff or well-known for making pieces about Syrian refugees in solitary confinement. In many other stories. And even this one which is more recently record out of Microsoft stage, I kind of like this Clinic is the first volumetric kiss. He's too used to compete against each other and then they competed in college and actually now they are engaged to get married. So anyway about me

Hi, I'm job over and I'm commercial artist. Professor at Johns Hopkins University, and a former US Diplomat that the UN unbr, where I had my first for a virtual reality, I was trying to be our because that was around 2014, Toronto, BR because I have this feeling that it was going to help communicate an emotional engagement issues. A lot of our other traditional ways of communicating weren't doing, I was mostly writing reports and trying to get people to care and understand about what was happening

all over the world and met with consistent. Sort of indifference until I was able to make my person. They are documentary. Procedure in partnership with Chris milk in company with in and making clouds are procedural. Incredibly eye-opening experience, made it 48 hours in Zachary camp where I went without it pausing and we went to we just to know what we're doing and we just tried to get whatever put a tree. Cut the idea, was it to really give a sense of the

reality of a young girl, living there on a day in the life of what it would be long. And we made it and it was then premiered at Sundance. In 2015 has also shown a lot of Peters and her husband got on to Ray's in normal amount of money for the steering causing. I think I've made a lot of people understand what the emotional tone as who I am. And that's how I got started. And keeps me going. The technology continues to evolve the possibilities also. So

I am Tiffany Kieran on the director of our text, our programming and Partnerships. I'm also super excited to be here. I come from a background. Having worked a lot in live-action and animation and also having a strong history and nonprofits and causes the song from Refugee relief to shelters and immersive. Breach of Ethics, which is the world's largest environmental experience for the whales and dolphins and the elephants and rhinos and Mr. Immersive experiences under the door and get them to Thank you all. So, so

much for taking the time to dig into this today. This is more than just a panel about the yard, just the panel about how media technology shape the world and CR is an excellent way to the media. Technology space is, it amplifies all of the key issues from privacy to psychological effects on time and nor understanding what makes you be? Are you sure what made you pursue working in this medium before most people had? Even heard of it really interests me. Is this idea of duality of present presents? Basically means that you feel the Sensation that you are two

places at once. And that's truly, there is really is from opening night of hunger and Sunday as well. You already know if you were going to react but did the Dirty War down on the ground with a person who wasn't there? Trying to touch them the goggles, you can see out the side so it wasn't like I didn't know, they weren't in that room. I just feel like they're both places at once. I think that impact is really important, right? As a really interesting, an extraordinary impact and for me to tell stories about The Strokes on the left was beaten to death and take her to death

by border patrol or Kenny who's on the right. He spent and was literally, cause mental break for him years. In solitary confinement, do you just have a very difficult time putting people on scene in the stories that access and they are let you do that and Dad. This is a short little clip. It also shows you what happened 40% of homeless youth come from the lgbtq community because they've been thrown out in their homes due to their sexual orientation. After I gave my head women, the actress has approached

me and she really wanted to make this piece about homelessness in the lgbtq community in collaboration with the true colors find. I was lucky enough to begin working with them on finding the right materials to tell the story. We ended up using the audio of Daniel Pierce, who was thrown up by his own family and having to record the terrible compensation and choose? Why don't you tell me what's wrong with you? So I put in the audience in the middle of this physical moment, you know, using the motion-capture putting on digital

characters and then making a life-size, what happens all around you. It's too startled to listen, you've heard, which is disturbing enough, and maybe watch videos of this type of steam. But if it's there and you feel physically vulnerable, you connect to Daniel, and what he's going through in a way that I don't think any other medium afford it, if it is a really significant and powerful woman to be there with Daniel, when, when he that venerable, when he's surrounded by people who hate him, just for being who he is. Requesting my work. Do you want to come?

We also use new technologies, something called volumetric capture, which is with a company called it, I assume from every direction around a person and it creates a hologram. And we use that moment that technology as kind of a PostScript to offer messages messages of. Hope, you'll give people some ideas of who know how you can get to the other side. Alright, thank you. Could you share a little bit about what made you start creating VR and why you continue this mode of Storytelling? I have a few,

you know, that a lot of the traditional media. That's out there. I, Never really felt. We could express what I would feel about living and working in in places all over the world that I did when I was with the UN and as a humanitarian and I think it was more a way to find a medium. That would help Express a lot of the, the the respect and the all one feels for the human Spirit. When it's kind of embarrassing, different, and challenging circumstances. And I think we have very

stereotype view of what people go through and how people live. And I think There there is a chance now with this medium with virtual reality, to kind of give some of the nuance and help understand something in ways that are not just binary like good or bad or you know, or or other ways that we think about it. And I think we also don't understand as much cuz it's still a medium. That's not been perverted by advertising and propaganda yet and I think we don't realize

how much traditional media is in a way manipulative. And I think, you know, why do we have to keep fighting to make sure this is not manipulated. I completely agree. Tiffany. Can you speak to your journey into the VR space? So it kind of started with me. As I mentioned, I was like, working in the studio systems, we were actually couldn't really starting to take on a lettuce like entertainment, the, our projects, and it was around that time that I, you know, I was working on a fundraiser with, not a whole lot of projects and out to the reservation. And I

was seeing this kind of like devastating, it was extremely difficult situations and starting to look into more of being used for social good. Definitely one of the early and I kept thinking that, if you could put somebody in a VR headset, you know In that huge landscape, you could actually really get somebody to feel like they were there. And when I was working with jameisha Patel on that's my Father which is a piece about a child trafficking Survivor moments in that we're

very difficult place to get people to relate to and there's a moment where this young child is on a train and she's being leered at by all these men surrounding her and Spooks so many people out and it was so disturbing. And that's when I started really realizing that that was where people were going to start to have these kind of far more critical accelerations of compassion for issues that they normally my remote or that's too far away from here. I can't relate to that they

are just so impossibly makes you feel like you're there. And it was also from there starting to hear. And we were also seeing that this was having like, really great impact with the fundraising and it's been in, you know, they growing in a Wonder World discuss is how it helped raise billions of dollars. So thank you so much. I wanted to touch on one of my concerns with this medium, which is that it requires extensive specialty equipment, not just for creators

before the audience as well, and that there is a particular kind of person. Generally, ask who ends up telling stories and defining the narrative in VR. Tiffany and your work, overseeing the films that come through or sects are what do you see as the best solutions to ensure diversity within the narrative? A really great example recently. So we just did a really wonderful show, Steven Hamblin, who is A co-director on a project called Legend react star. She directed that with Jada gay and what I love so much about the

team and they're telling the story through an indigenous lens and it's a really beautiful VR project. That they've also got kind of elements are working on. It's all about pulling people into nature and telling these like ancient stories and getting people to reconnect to ancient roots and stina discussed how it was really important to tell that to an indigenous lands and in the project they discussed the importance of not having like a voyeuristic take towards Native people. So I think that you know that voice, you know, those people owning their voice and working

with them. This industry to make sure that people are earning their voice in these. In these projects. We also from a partnership level have worked with voices of America is a great example of library and who which is an indigenous climate action, Collective and Hip-Hop. And with powerful about that is, you know, we know from from the environmental standpoint with indigenous people. That's two-thirds of the environment over 80% of our biodiversity is protected by 5% of the population of these indigenous populations. And so

it's really important to tell those narratives with them as leaders in the field. Really interesting work. Tiffany is so fun to see all the work you guys have been able to do it or Zacks. I feel lucky that I was able to inspire you at all, cuz you've certainly taken the wrong with it and made it amazing. Homeless, are there any strategies you'd like to share with filmmakers who are telling these kinds of stories? I think what we and is probably similar, you know, for Nani is well, obviously he knows I think there's always time in the panel if I'm with

Nani, I have to say, you know, it without, without her sort of pioneering work. I think a lot of us would be here, but but for me, I would say, you know, I was very interested in subverting people's expectation of the technology and I wanted to know what the UN. We have a mandate to you. No tell and try to get people to care about different issues. And it was very important that it was through the words of the people themselves that we would work with them. We would cook create it. But in some ways that it wasn't going to

be just like the Diplomat or celebrity talking about their trip about going to a Syrian refugee camp or dealing with ebola or it wouldn't even be any un worker that. I got the word and, you know, you'd be surprised. I mean I don't want to shame the UN, but if you go to the un's YouTube channel, you know, that's what we had to do with, with the audience was more about showing what they have done, rather than just letting people speak for themselves. And so I think it was really important with this new technology that we were able to kind of procreating with

people and really helped them tell their their their story that way. And I think you know, that is not an easy thing to do and that's actually very controversial now days where I think, you know, we want to make sure everyone has the right to tell their own story and to do things. But you know, in working with VR very early, I think the idea was that this was a technology that was being, you know, being said that if he couldn't even tell those types of stories that it would be about gaming and entertainment. And I think Army showing the use

cases of what how we can use this to kind of connect people and to have it be about regular people. I think is what makes it very powerful. I mean, I'll always remember you being in some DC or some conference in San Francisco, and people lining up to to want to watch clouds or procedure and it's just to me, it's, you know, it was incredible that this was going to be their first experience and hopefully it would change their values and their way they would think about this technology and ask more from it. How to say clouds in Reseda we're lucky because of you making that gabo it made a lot

of people go. Okay, this is something right. I was still doing the full walk right in that the distribution, which is possible the time. And without closure overseeder, I don't think would have been quite accepted the way that it became as it as a possible medium, so your role and that was huge. Maybe I can pick up one of those fingers pointed in my face, like you can't do that, that'll never work. That's a that's four games. You can't tell Mom new stories using this me, literally in my colleagues attacking me for wanting to use it for this

time store time. So, you know this, it's a superb. Both in terms of how you tell the story but also in terms of Sino distribution you caught admitted viable at the gecko. Oh, thank you. I have to say to with both of your projects with cause of Reseda and the project Syria early early on influences to having worked for a long time directly with, you know, Refugee populations with projects. And just having a situation when you feel like you're sitting right across

from somebody in that situation, that is where those impact or moments, where I was like, oh my gosh, this is going to completely change this game for, you know, how hard it is for people to tell these stories are, like, kudos to you share a little bit about your learnings and process democratizing, the medium. Sure. I'm here tells the story of Two Sisters who try unsuccessfully to rescue a third sister from a fatal attack by an ex-boyfriend and they were both had this live Mike's on the phone cuz it both called 911 that I could intercut

with and we try to take the real stuff and and really put you on seeing you even the CG of the real event and of course we don't put you there in the moments to this the sister is killed but by being in the room when he's holding her hostage The two sisters were very, we didn't log interviews and they really wanted to get out this issue of domestic violence and what happened to Sister. Cuz it's just so in a frequent and three women, today are killed by their domestic

Partners or Partners. So they actually started a whole campaign for domestic violence. So I work closely with them. I think the New York Times bought it, they felt very uncomfortable, mentioning, The Sisters organization and I would say that I would have pushed back a lot harder on that. Because if they're going to, let me tell their store in this way and the New York Times is going to publish it. We should offer them their voice, which is you don't really want to say what they're doing to fight this to and more. Recently, we really want to change who gets to tell these stories cuz

their convictions have been hard. So we built this set of no code solution to let people. Begin to make the stuff, volumetric onto themselves using just buttons. Introducing reach the first web platform for creating and sharing extended reality, including augmented and virtual reality using real people and places built by the Pioneers emblematic group. Reaches its easy-to-use browser-based solution, that makes the power of walk around spatial experiences available to anyone

reach. Let you craft your own volumetric story in a few easy steps using a no code drag-and-drop solution. First you access a library of 3D locations, many of them captured using stunning high-resolution, photogrammetry. You can also upload locations you created yourself. Then use our simple tool to add your own real-life video interviews. Volumetric characters are 3D assets. Finally, you can share the results. Be a simple web link in bed. You're finished or just like you would a video. No need for downloads or dedicated apps, reach eliminates, all the

distribution barriers facing room. Scale, VR viewers can navigate stories on a smartphone tablet, or PC, or put on a headset and walk around 4. Sign up now to discover how far you can reach into the future or the stories we tell or is vivid and three-dimensional as the world we inhabit. Thank you and Tiffany. You've done a lot of work and creating an accessible. That's accessible for both Traders and audience. Could you share any suggestions? You have four. Other festival. Yeah. I mean one of the things I love so much about our Festival is that it's free and open to the public

in 2019 and would not dare came on as our major partner for 2020. We are expecting over 200,000 and a lot of people that might be their first experience to be able to do a rvr. This is not necessarily something that a lot of people can afford or, you know, how that home or in their schools, and it's also been a priority for us in the festivals that we partner with. We've had that incredible Partnerships with Guanajuato International Film Festival, which has been free, and open to

the public for 23 years ago and boat and other incredible partners, that that is a priority priority to them as well. And I would also sang from the programming side, we worked recently with Washington marine biologist and TV host, Eric will be for the National Geographic Explorer. And they have this incredible program called 21st century mermaids. And it's all from an intersectional, environmentalism Flynn's to train kids up in Steam and salmon. The educate kids on BR and it's

just such a wonderful program and we really love the program from that perspective of stories and I would again go from there. You know, when we talked about inclusion another program, that I love so much, Robin Darrell's code-break. She's really a dresser thing that we often have this conversation within our industry of how many people have a VR headset at home. And she's asking the question, how many people have a computer internet home. And right now, he's are struggling to have a dedicated computer or Internet for remote learning and

I think that's the other thing that we really have to be asking these questions of like where Some of the people that I've ever worked with that have the most incredible creativity to share. I've been through, you know, living in refugee camps, living in homeless shelters, surviving foster care and we need to be exclusive of them as well. Tiffany, you're the perfect person to dig into quantitative impact, because you actually coached the participant and our backs are integrate and hacked into

their pieces. And you talked a little bit about this process. Yeah, so we have a few models that we use in terms of encouraging and packed and I will say it is the kind of the first question we want to be part of our Festival is, you know, we always make it clear that it's very important to us that when people come out of an experience that they know what to do next, but we not just tell them, you know, stories about how endangered species or over polluted Waters next,

Frank that were working with now and it's super fun synchronized swimming as part of this about how to look into climate jobs and how their Investments are impacting the environment and voting, it's super fun project. Another way that we really encourage and pandas through filmmakers that literally or changing government policy. And one of the examples we have of that works a lot with a really wonderful collaboration and they had asked us at one point to take your project so that they can show them. They have been working in Mexico and they credited

our festival with part of that Classics work which is super exciting to us. And we have certain filmmakers that we work with. Those sleep was a project about the kind of intersection of illegal fishing and human trafficking. And we've gone with them to the UN, to the boat, with the Tongan ambassadors. And one of the things I Was really powerful. And it is, you know, we are human trafficking from telling them. They were there telling their stories, and you see the impact of these campaigns go to sleep, got to over 12 million people.

And it also has that critical impact for that individual, whose life was. It was all through that. And the other, super fun way of that we've shown, in fact, is is this one of my favorite examples of a credible job of endangered species fundraising into her? And so she had to stay where you could dance like and they are in there and 50. Windows are on the red list for endangerment and you've had similar successes with your work about the impact, Dave, side, and how you measured that impact. We did some studies around Greenland melting and we found that people actually

really responded in a much more successful way to the material. How could he possibly go away? The glaciers retreated more in the last 15 years. That includes you, 70 years? Would like to know why? I know you're trying about climate change, right? This is really important, because by being there, you stopped thinking of God's. The scientists are just making stuff up. You know, when you're in a plane with a NASA scientist, if they're dropping the temp out as monitor, you know, off the back of

the plane that feels like something you could personally do and I feel like, you know, right now and we need to do to switch this information even though it's virtual, it can offer a real opportunity to set the record straight. And tomorrow, we can create some ways to, to bridge. Divides with his Planned Parenthood, peace. When we put you on, seen where your yelled at, in the same way that young women real. When they go into these clinics. And, you know, this is a guy who's lip-syncing real audio, right?

When we took that out on to the road to see, How people react with even the most conservative communities, felt that women should not be treated that way to matter, if they were proportion or anti-abortion the middle ground? Was that young women should not be treated that way. And that's pretty profound of a shift in a change at a middle ground. That I think we need to find more of, obviously, in the sky divided nation. Do you mention clouds over Sidra? How did that come to be? And what is that teach you about the impact? This medium could have,

you know, when I can feel like I have this magic thing and a headset that I would put on people's head one by one and they would be really move to and they would there be a reaction and people wanted to do something and I think I couldn't quite figure out what the next step would be if I want to take something that's so limiting. That was just in that in a very mean I think at one point Samsung said, I had more, I have more heads-up than anyone in the world are giving me like, $204, like for they were ever made in and they just said, you only know. There's nobody, I had

to Guinness Book of World Records. Most, anybody won time. And so we package these up and we just started, you know, sending them to different donor conferences for Syria and that was our first sort of thinking like, let's try to influence the decision makers and bring these magical headsets and do that in that actually ended up making an enormous difference because thank you Moon. The secretary-general of the time we would give a little speech and we would put everybody at the secretary of state level, you know, before they would make their commitments to Syria and they have the

mandatorily watch clouds, or seizure and a headset and then come out of it and then secretary-general be like, well, What do you think of now? And it would be in a far exceeded all of the projections because I think of course, people felt more moved and committed then at some point, you know, we said that's fine for. You know, I'm very powerful people, what can we do to kind of bring this change to regular people. And I realized that at that point, Google cardboard and very low-cost ways were, we're being very prevalent that you could turn your, your phone into a VR device, your

smartphone. And so, I realize that there are face-to-face fundraisers for Unicef, all over the world are in 40, different countries, 15 different languages and that they are that is some of the most significant way that you can separate his money and a microwave across the world. And we realize that if we gave the option for a lot of these people stopping people that maybe we can make a 2-minute version of clouds or seizure and people can watch it. And we can't measure how much they would give with Dr and without VR, and it was really incredible to see that it would consistently

double donations at first in New Zealand. And then we worry piloted this with this project. And then we had it all over all over the world. And its continued even to this day, that's probably someone somewhere watching it and giving giving more money as a result. And, you know, after that, I think we were thinking, you know, the money's is really interesting. How do we continue to think about other ways to the do it? One of the most impactful things I did afterwards was, I made my mother's win which was about Gaza, and we started showing it on the streets of Tel Aviv. Just to have

conversations. New Baseline question is what people felt about Palestinians and television that in there many many ways that you can go with it. But that was, I think the first thing about impact that I was pretty astounded by, but there's so much more to be done. What if we get a lot of pushback on is VR the empathy machine, right? You know, or that as if you know, it's kind of taken out of context because this idea that mean, you're going to feel some sympathy is its course, it's nonsense, you've got to have storytelling and the better, the

storytelling, you know. And we talked earlier about how important the communities, whose stories were working together or helping them tell their own stories, you know, that's, that's really valuable, but I just want to let, you know, make it really clear that can be already know. This whole part of the stylist in VR, in a make change in the world. And I think, clearly already we were shot in multiple examples in how it's done. So, but, you know, we also are following in the footsteps of

Film and television and audio and we are another medium. It's just different is for allowing people to step into a volumetric, space or volume to see in every direction that they do in this, in the physical world, and that offers to new some, some really knew embodied Sensations, you know, we, we, we, we, we don't just see the world with her eyes when you go to the movie theater. Something scary happened to jump and I think we are takes advantage of that. And I do believe that with good storytellers and kind of salt from the goblin Tiffany bring to

this medium. We really can't see some important change. I know, I just, you know, I've seen it time and time again, what you say Nani is is right? I mean So much emphasis on on the, on the virtual reality and not as much on on the storytelling. And you know, I think that's what's kind of made people forget how hard how absolutely hard it is to tell good stories in VR and to make it work and how It's it's even harder when you know we're working in a new medium and we know that if we get it right,

it can have the impact as we are proving that in, there are all these things but each time when you come back to the drawing board and you start again as technology evolves as things get, you know, he's not old enough to figure out how to tell those narratives and what would work. I think we cannot underestimate that is what I think is making the change and you're very right. It is it is it is important not to forget that. And that's so easily forgotten because I think everyone focus is on but this technology can do because it's so transformative for Human Experience and

what we can what we can do and be and feel and see and experience. But I think that chorus thing of what makes us human is, is the story and I think figuring out how to make that merge with what this is, is what makes the difference in without it. I think there's going to be no change, you know, so it's about getting more storytellers excited and to work to kind of tell those stories that you were saying. So I just wanted to reiterate that we received from our perspective. You know, very much immersed in the environment of space and knowing what's at stake

in the house is on fire. Like we don't have time and what's the the honor in in my position is he get to work with a lot of these filmmakers that are very much the firefighters and they are treating us are content where they're putting out the fires there. Firefighters are training. Really confused is when I see a lot of work programs often or people kind of creating content, Where the messages, you know, it's extremely expensive, CG nightmare of the people

that were working with people that are getting me stories. Told that you know, we're there in between the whale in the whaler, there in between the elephant in the poacher and they're very much working on the grounds are endangered species. Are getting the attention that they need at the habitat XR or the ocean, or investment, and what they're doing. Big message on environmental works if we are going to program and ensuring environmental work that it really leads by protecting those

protectors. Thank you Tiffany. I cannot agree more. When discussing the impact of the technology is also important to think of the potential risks. This particular study comes to mind considering increase privacy concerns with VR technology. The virtual human interaction lab published in nature that with five minutes of VR, tracking data, even with all other identifiable, information taken off, they could identify user out of a pool of 500. Add rebates.

Current need for more privacy in the technology space. And I'd like to open this question about the other issues that we might need to create an address within our infrastructure. Nani, are there certain things, you think we should be wary of in pursuing the technology? All the way through history. Technology has been used for propaganda for both good and evil. We know how evil it was to use film to fake. The way the trees are being traded Nazi Germany. It's also been used since you wouldn't expect like you do the Rosetta Stone was actually a taxation

document, right? No doubt. They are going to be using some point as a way to track, you can collect your taxes, but I do, you know, worry about who also is in charge of the way to Technologies use. I think that I let you know, I had told you I'm a bit disturbed by what the sound is Oculus Rift ended up doing she, you know, I don't care if it was even joking around with these guys. Too. You know how himself making, what's considered a white supremacist symbol with somebody who's a holocaust denier? Makes me very

uncomfortable at this. Persons ethical approaches are so you don't even confused. So I guess is a complimentary way I can put it that he should be allowed to become creating like a VR surveillance company of the border that makes me very uncomfortable. I feel like we have to be thinking about who gets used to technology how to get to use it and what's the transparency behind it? Yeah but I think it goes deeper than anywhere, you know, it's not just one person. I mean the the companies that control the, the fate of BR Facebook Google you know I

was reading all the iPads and I follow very closely shoshana zuboff who ride surveillance capitalism and how we need to be a lot more critical about you know, we shouldn't the revolving kind of Kind of dealing with these bigger companies and I think turning a blind eye to their broader, you know what? They've been brought up in a part of and how I think we are, will then hit, you know, it's impossible for it to be divorced from that. I think that's what concerns me is those broader struggles and that are coming up with something like surveillance

capitalism and transparency in the interoperability, is this idea that your data is yours and that you can take your data anywhere, you want to do whatever platform that you decide to go to and if they don't own your dad and that you on your data. And I think your personal shift and you know who you are and that that that if you're going to make that deal, you're part of the deal. And I need this is super interesting premise. That. Might offer some Ways to frame this and also Johnson to train. Who's a, you know, she said, they lost, but Harvard is really bright guy. Talks

also about what is the responsibility of the Platforms in that is still holding your information. In the same way, an accountant has a duty to you to not reveal your data that these platforms should assume the same type of role and he's been successful getting some of this stuff has to Congress and I think that's I'm also a way to the grub positive movement for yeah. I would say you know over the time in covid-19 team extremely concerning for me in a couple of years. Now with wild immersion endorsed

by Jane Goodall in nothing at all and enduring covid, she gave a lot of Illuminating talks about what's oven being forgotten in this. Is that these pandemic Originating from us messing with nature and that SARS MERS Ebola HIV AIDS. Covid. And we are going to continue to see pandemics and experience can to mix like this. If we keep messing with nature and Akash ganga, which is kind of the the all-female anti-poaching unit of internationally to crochet Foundation, we did panels with them and they were discussing his open letter to

humanity that they did kind of begging people to understand that these pandemics are preventable and that if we protect nature and stop messing with nature that we can protect and prevent future pandemics. But you know what, we saw during covid-19, xxxplosion of hoaxes about coded and seeing technology being a place where that explosion of of hoax has led to the Justice Firestorm of miss her information. I would really beg people to think about how they Manipulated in those situations and how that manipulation

affects the work of people, like Jane Goodall. In those Frontline anti-poaching Rangers like option gun. I think that is an absolutely great Point Tiffany. I think that this is no lie, you know. We're looking more and more of his pentamix must be addressed. Exactly. So in conclusion, I'd love to learn what your Visions are for the future of the are not simply as an advanced technology but as a medium for the betterment of humankind and then what are you working for us? With this technology? There was a

a paradox that a technology that supposedly isolates you, How we think about technology generally is that, you know it can isolate you in a way we're putting on a headset and in some ways I could make people understand humans better and to connect with each other and so for me, I'm My Hope Is that whatever we think of going with VR in the future that it kind of challenges those sort of binary ways of thinking, we're, we're in the real world, not spiritual,

and this is escapism, and this is not. I really look to a lot of young people. You know, who think about, you know, gender in a different way, in gender fluidity, and challenging binary ways of thinking, in, in society. And I think my hope is that VR is a part of breaking that down rather than reinforcing those through binary ways of thinking, cuz I think that's kind of what our problem is a little bit. Is this is good? This is bad. This is how it is. And I think ever, Thing has become very polarizing because there hasn't been that ability to think in different ways and

you do for me I still think like we said in a VR is still a progression is different than other mediums but it borrows from all the great storytelling mediums before us. And you know, for me when I I don't, when I read a great book, I'm feeling like I come back a changed and better person who can view my world and my reality a different way. And I expect the same thing out of PR. During the narrow, it says he loves keeping a fresh cut flowers and likes to see them. The first thing after he's in VR because he sees them in

more beautiful ways. I think that's what this technology can do and it's and it's best way that's best for him. I love that. So yeah, you know, I have to say they like especially during covid-19 the kind of like shutdowns that have happened in and how emerging Tech is kind of help people connect to this. I fell back in love with emerging technology. I've always loved it but we also get to see some super exciting things and I, I will say that to was like, I hope with all of the negative news that people hear about the environment that they also understand that there are

just extraordinary solutions for so many environmental issues and fiber. You said something really wonderful before when you were kind of talking about this is that VR is like, such a perfect place to Envision a future where we are living more symbiotically with nature. A brighter future is a project that we've been working with with Mary Matheson and I love what they've done with this where they've taken people into the all of these spaces where people are, you know, cleaning up the garbage patch and then creating for Forest and creating these Landscapes, where we

can really learn to, to live on Nature's terms, which I think is going to be critical to us, being sustainable species. And there's a really wonderful moment that Rob Stewart from shark water shared this place could be paradise if we designed it the right way and it could be paradise for us and for millions of other species. So that's what I love to. See an emerging technology and vision through VR. And do you know if we can? Take this moment. They were

living in Worlds in separated by just endemic. Is there a way that we can connect? And it's kind of an interesting to see how many people are reaching into the universal world and social Technologies to try to connect and see each other next year in sync together. Mean, you're not interesting me. The Sundance Film Festival had their largest audience ever with everything virtual. And I think that these are good. Things are always fresh, and their way trusted, you know, we know that somebody's going to come up with way more interesting ways to tell stories using this technology on the we could ever

even imagine. But I think that's the exciting part about all this that that that we're just beginning to understand how we can connect and virtual ways that will be Better sometimes and different sometimes and wear some time, but it provides a whole landscape of opportunity. And I think that that's the, that's the really, you know, whole part about this yet, we're even talked about things like apple, and their new lidar capture phones, and that they're going to be making a headset. No doubt at all. That, you know, Dad is indicating that

we're going to go that direction. So it isn't just a pie-in-the-sky idea, this is happening, this is real. We are going to be shifting into integrating, its dinner reality, AR VR and in our everyday life. So I feel like my job and I think my fellow panelist Goblin Tiffany would agree that, you know, we need to be the also thinking about how How we can use the technology for the good, as well as fun and games and connection and play and everything else,

but also, you know, tell great stories but also help us Envision what the future might look like future that we want. Thank you all so much. This is been very inspirational to me. And thank you for your time. For all of you who are watching, feel free to visit this site or links to all of the references. In all the work that we've talked about today, you all next year in person Can't wait to see in person. Are you guys? Yay. Can't wait. Thank you so much.

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