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Who Controls the Past: The Tulsa Race Massacre | SXSW 2021

Kristi Orisabiyi Williams
Chair at Greater Tulsa African American Affairs Commission
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SXSW 2021
March 16, 2021, Online, Austin, USA
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Who Controls the Past: The Tulsa Race Massacre | SXSW 2021
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About speakers

Kristi Orisabiyi Williams
Chair at Greater Tulsa African American Affairs Commission
Tiffany Crutcher
Founder at Terence Crutcher Foundation
Jeffery Robinson
Deputy Legal Director and Director of the Trone Center for Justice & Equality at ACLU
Chief Egunwale F Amusan
President at African Ancestral Society

Kristi Williams is a community activist/advocate/organizer in Tulsa, Oklahoma. She serves as Chairperson of the Greater Tulsa African American Affairs Commission and is a member and organizer of the 1921 Tulsa Mass Graves Investigation Committee.

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Dr. Crutcher is the recipient of many awards and honors including the 2017 Cecil St. Clair Service Award (Montgomery, AL), the 2018 Martin Luther King Service Award (Union Springs, AL), the 2016 Women in Heels Leadership Award (Tulsa, OK), the 2019 Dan Allen Center for Social Justice Local Champion Award, just to name a few. Crutcher was named a 2020 Tulsan of the year and recognized by the Oklahoma City Thunder Basketball Organization as a Changemaker in the state of Oklahoma. She was recently awarded in October of 2020 with a grant from The Black Voices for Black Justice Fund co-chaired by Kerry Washington, Wes Moore, Jean Desravines, and Kristen Clarke because of her grassroots work in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

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Jeffery Robinson is the founder of The Who We Are Project and the creator of “Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America” – the documentary, lecture, podcast, and more. Additionally, Jeffery is a deputy legal director at the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) national office and the Director of the ACLU’s Trone Center for Justice and Equality, which houses the organization’s work on criminal and racial justice issues. Since graduating from Harvard Law School in 1981, Jeffery has almost four decades of experience working on these issues. For seven years, he represented indigent clients in state court at The Defender Association and then in federal court at the Federal Public Defender’s Office, both in Seattle. In 1988, Jeffery began a 27-year private practice at the Seattle firm of Schroeter, Goldmark & Bender, where he represented a broad range of clients in local, state, and federal courts on charges ranging from shoplifting to securities fraud and first degree murder. He has tried over 200 criminal cases to verdict and has tried more than a dozen civil cases representing plaintiffs suing corporate and government entities. Jeffery was one of the original members of the John Adams Project and worked on the behalf of one of five men held at Guantanamo Bay charged with carrying out the 9/11 attacks. In 2015, Jeffery joined the ACLU in his current role. In addition to being a nationally recognized trial attorney, Jeffery is also a respected teacher of trial advocacy and the

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Chief Amusan is also a certified Traditional Ancestral Chief (title bestowed in Abeokuta, Nigeria). He is the President of the African Ancestral Society with members in Oklahoma, Dallas, Houston, Louisiana, and Kentucky.

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About the talk

How is it possible that the 1921 massacre of as many as thousands of Black people in Tulsa, Oklahoma, was almost erased from US history? And why is it finally penetrating the national consciousness? Featured in HBO’s The Watchmen and Lovecraft Country, this history survived because of the dedicated efforts of Black Tulsans, including the descendants of survivors, who have made it their life’s work to uncover what really happened and make sure we never forget. Moderated by Jeffery Robinson from Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America, this panel examines the work of these activists to take control of the historical narrative, and in so doing, to force a reckoning on racial justice in this country and a long overdue conversation on reparations for Black Americans.#tulsa1921

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Good evening everyone. I'm Jeff Robinson. One of the producers of who we are a Chronicle of racism in America. I grew up in the late fifties and the sixties in Memphis Tennessee, with my family active in the Civil Rights Movement. I went to Marquette University and Harvard Law School. I spent 34 years as a criminal defense lawyer dealing with issues of racism in the criminal legal system. But when deaths in my family, cause my 13 year old nephew living in New York City to become my thirteen-year-old son, living with me and

Seattle, Washington. I found myself reading about race in a different way and I found myself uncovering stuff, I had never heard before lyrics to one of my favorite songs came into my mind. I can't get my head around. I thought I found it but I found that I don't know. Shitt And what I didn't know about our hidden history and America of anti-black racism could make a documentary film and that's what we did. And here is a cliff to give you an idea of what it's about. If you have ever owned a slave,

please raise your hand. Slavery is not our fault. We didn't do it, we didn't cause it but it is our shared history. America was founded on white supremacy, put the interstate on top of their body memory. I'm just looking at him in the ditch with his eyes, open in a lawn chair, with a shotgun across his lap because he was going to be ready. If somebody came to the house and must be a revolution of values. It will never get easier to have an honest discussion about race in America that it is right now cuz if we wait, it is only going to get harder.

Who we are is a Chronicle of racism in America. Not the chronicle of racism in America because the chronicle would include all kinds of groups that have been discriminated against in this country. I'm trying to tell the story of anti-black racism in, as I learned things about our past. One of the things I learned about was the Tulsa Massacre. I had never read anything about this than any part of my education. And the more I read, the more I knew that when we started filming, we had to go to Tulsa. It was off and I wanted to talk to people

who could explain what happened, why it happened and what needs to be done about it. And three of those people are here with me this evening and I will start with Dr. Tiffany. Oh, thank you so much Jeff for for having me on this panel. And I'm just honored to participate on this prestigious platform. I'm dr. Tiffany Crutcher from Tulsa, Okla, land of the Terence Crutcher foundation and the Black Wall Street Memorial and I'm also the director of the justice for Greenwood Foundation. Cheap. Did you

introduce yourself next? Absolute sea parmesan, president of the African ancestral. Society of Survivor, Raymond for senior and an advocate for our community. And I'm grateful to be a part of this wonderful panel and grateful to be part of this, this film that you place that you put together that really reflects who we are, but thank you very much. And Christine last but not least, please introduce yourself. I am Christy Williams also, known as one of the forces of nature and I am an advocate. I am I shared the greater Tulsa

African American Affairs to me. I'm in the City of Tulsa and I'm just a lover of my community in my people. I am just thrilled to have three people from Tulsa, Oklahoma here, with me this evening, to talk about this. And Christy I think there are a lot of people in America who have heard the term. Black Wallstreet, they may have even seen something on an HBO show called Watchman and that was maybe the first kind of thing that they're learning about in terms of what happened in Tulsa. Can you tell me? What was Black Wall Street?

I'm absolutely not. And Black Wall Street was I have to stop back by saying, you know, before it became a state it was in the territory in the only people who could only hear some black people and so Greenwood was actually created on a lot of Indian Territory but you know, every dream to have Oklahoma become an all-black State and so he would send recruiters out with the straight hating black people. Come here. Greenwood. It was 40. City blocks of a community, a strong black community. And

when did you first learn about the stories of what happened there? I always tell people that Greenwood to me before I knew Greenwood, you don't mind my aunt, my great-aunt, Jamie at work, she was in a dream last night and we would hear those stories but I've never put it together, but it wasn't until I got out of high school that I really learned about agreeing with him. I was like I started learning about survivors of a fart. Chief, I have fun in, in the research I've done. And then talking with you and Christy and taking the real Black Wall Street tour. Wish you

were kind enough to take me on a team to Tulsa, I am seeing records of store, all kinds of businesses, all kinds of community-based Wells, what was it that happened? That led this community to be destroyed. How did this? How did this come about? Well, contrary to popular belief, it wasn't about Dick Rowland and Sarah page. It was about. Control it was about land. It was about jealousy. It was about seeing a people that you've spent the past few decades in the past, a few hundreds of years. Before that just

transform, human beings into peace who took transcended, your ideas are America's ideas, and these people who saw their dreams, go up in smoke and I'm out of 24 hours for the victims. Such sickness a real mental health issue issue, but Greenwood the whole entire District when you Black Wall Street, don't think about a linear street. That goes north and south right? Or east and west and 1/2 square mile area. Was destroyed in 24 hours in a little over 24 hours. And she says you're talking about this, could we could we roll the tape of there is some footage of of what happened in Greenwood and as

your can we roll? This tape is Chief is explaining what happened. So, you know, there's been this doesn't this idea of what does, what is the destruction of Greenwood look. Like when it entail, like as you look at this video, I want you to imagine hearing the screams of people burning inside of homes. I want you to smell with the smell of burning flesh. Could probably stupid possibly smell. Like, I want you to look at the furniture sitting outside of those homes that have been looted in that video. That's what you see. When you see little African the

video, people say that was a demeaning statement, but I'll take that when you look at this video. That's not the result of fire. When you have bricks in the middle of the street, that's the result of bombing Just like Twin Towers just like the Oklahoma City Murrah building and chief am I right. That the the Tulsa Massacre was the first incident of aerial bombing in United States history, because white people took airplanes, drop burning balls of turpentine on homes and businesses and the shop black folks, and they ran outside. Absolutely absolutely.

It was even to call it a massacre marginalizes. If that was a that was a true genocide. That was that's what you're witnessing. When you look at this. What you're witnessing. Some small turbo is in it. I'm going to call you but we're looking at now is the issue of troops being rushed to the scene and I'd like people to think about the images that we saw when black lives matter protest violence and how the troops were protecting property. And look what these troops were doing when it was black

homes and neighborhoods that were being destroyed. And I don't know what to say about this cheap. Well, you know, he's wearing police protection in order to leave the concentration camps that will put in place. You had to write no longer free citizen. You are enslaved. That's what you call a useful to an independent self-sustaining self-sufficient. Individual who has learned how to accept this is place in humanity. Cheap, you talked about, we talked about what happened

here. Obviously there was personal and Community, well that was devastated. Didn't people have insurance policies? Hundreds of insurance claims. Most of these people, this is one of the reasons we use the term Riot, right? So historically there was a riot claws into his insurance policies. That did not allow people to recover during the massacre after the massacre. So, all those people who had property was destroyed that was no, there was no opportunity to recover because it was written into the insurance policy that you could not recover in the event of a riot. But that's not a

right what we saw. That's not a ride. What you witnessed? That was a holocaust. What about police involvement and what happened in 1921 police involvement, that was a police action Wright, the police, the police narrated, they headed that activity time to themselves to deputize. Hundreds of people in a city that is police conduct. That's police activity, Melissa. That's not an individual. The police department itself that's the city of Tarsus and I'm going to violate your Fourteenth Amendment

equal protection under the law rights of a citizen that I have. Right, that's what you got. So we're talking about when we talk about the destruction in the is it was an actual experience, we witness a Holocaust happen in the United States of America in the country would go and defend other people victims of the Holocaust. Knock knock. Doctor Crusher were talking about police involvement and almost a century later. In 2016. Your brother is the victim of police violence against. Can you talk to us about the connections? You

see between what happened in 1921 and what happened in Tulsa in 2016 with your brother. Yes, absolutely. almost 100 years later Tulsa, still out of order and it and I'm trigger just You know, watching that video and hearing Chief, you know, speak about state-sanctioned violence and it in my twin brother, was killed by the same Police Department. I always say that the same Police Department that burnt down Greenwood or Black Wall Street, is the same Police Department. The same

state-sanctioned violence that killed my brother in 2016 hand in the air and in so nothing has really changed in. And you know there were unarmed black listen to or thriving innocent black people for living their lives and as Chief said who are self-sufficient prosperous and this month, the KKK they came in and they killed unarmed citizens. Same with my twin brother. Almost 100 years later, he was unarmed hands in the air and they shot him down and it Those

parallels are so start Jeff because nobody rendered Aid, you know, that they told the people back in 1921 you know, the First Responders did you go and help these. These Negroes we're going to kill you to when Terrence was shot by Officer. Betty, Shelby a police officer said, don't give them first. They don't touch them until they let him lie on the ground and take his last breath alone. And and and guess what, the victim-blaming started, you know, they are they called it a riot because they said it was our fault. You know, we started my ancestors,

started it. In the same thing goes for what happened. Almost 100 years later, the mayor went on national TV. Mayor GT Bynum and said it was parents fault. Who knows? It was it was more about the Insidious use of drug use more so than it was about race. And if you think about Betty Shelby, he stated that he made me do it, and I had never been so afraid in my life. A white woman saying that she had never been so afraid because he encountered a black man, that wasn't committing a crime, he wasn't under arrest. He didn't have a weapon,

all he helped. So, the parallels are so startled. I think about, she's saying that man, you know, bombs were dropped from the air. Helicopters were looming in 2016. Jeff helicopters with lo mein at the scene where my brother was killed in that Hollow helicopter. Those police officers said that my brother looks like a bad dude. So I asked, you know nothing has changed almost 100 years. Later the same state-sanctioned violence that killed innocent black people in 1921 that burnt down. Greenwood is the same state-sanctioned violence

that killed my twin brother. And when you Tiffany I know that you have not watched that video and I understand have not watched that video in its complete floor but what is terrific about it and relating to. What happened in Tulsa is that with his hands in the air in a car that the officer had already cleared. And knew there wasn't a weapon in the car. And with the driver side window rolled up so it was impossible for him to reach inside the car. People in the helicopter above

saw a black man with his hands in the air walking away from police officers and doing nothing threatening and their response was that looks like a bad dude. And if they had seen a white man in the exact same circumstances, I think that man would be at home having dinner with his family tonight. Christy, as we think about what happened in Tulsa and its relationship to what's happening today. Are there other parallels that you see and you know that we saw

is what happened at the Capitol on January 6th. What were your thoughts about that? You know, I didn't have to stop worrying about it because that was a white on white crime. I mean that this is the way that I saw it. I knew nothing was going to come out of it but I did. About what happened at the Capitol. Asbestos are real reality but it was a reminder. Will chase you, please go ahead. If I could just piggyback off of that, the parallels I saw were when I saw that video at the nation's capital or actually solid take place. Real time, I Couldn't help but think about the

mobs of white rioters in 1921, it was like deja vu for me all over again. And, you know, when you think about how this massive star started with a lie, it was incited by by the Tulsa Tribune, with a lie in it. And I believe that on January 6th, that, that, that Riot was started because of a Lie by the ex president of the United States of America Donald Trump. And, you know, that's what happens. But it's Christy said that been a black lives matter Rally or black lives matter protest. I don't even think we would

have gotten to the, to the building. We would even got past the barricades, but if we would have gotten past those barricades, guess what? Another Massacre that would have took place almost 100 years later. And, you know what? I think about what happened in Tulsa, I just want to go back to this for a minute because I'm interested, when did y'all about what happened in Tulsa? And was there anything in your high school education that Focus started like Oklahoma history, or something that would have made it

mandatory to teach this to people? Jeffrey something I want to show you this cuz we talked about those parallels by hands up the picture says captured Negroes. Not detained shirt. Negroes Terrence Crutcher had his hands up. The parallels are so identical. Like if you don't learn from the past, you do repeat history because what happened at the courthouse in Tulsa. Oklahoma, on the day that of May 31st the mob. It already broken into the courthouse but nobody ever talks about that already broken the door broken.

They went into the Capitol Building, same rage, same attitude, right? As if this is a patriotic act, you just you just committed crimes breaking into building Right. So those meals should have been arrested at that point. You should have progressed any further than that recycle in history. What happened before the Spanish Flu 1918, what happened after us all across the nation in America rice all across the nation that would happen when we decided to show up at the courthouse building. If

we had shown up at the Capitol Building burned, all of Washington DC down If we just showed up to defend and you're interested, just to say we defend our rights as Citizens, we just spent it with whatever fight against tyranny, as Patriots, showed up and said, we're going to defend the Capitol building in Washington DC downtown Oklahoma. And chief as you as you talk about that and you showed that picture. It just brought me back to a moment when you and Christy took me on the real Wall

Street tour and cuz you just tell folks where those black men were headed and where do they ever came out from where they were headed? To convention hall. Convention hall events, we became Brady theater. But they will March. There are many of those men never came out of that building, that will people who witnessed them go in, but never come out. And the place became a trophy in the City of Tulsa, became the Brady theater, and it became a place of entertainment.

Write a place that has history became a place of entertainment. One woman even had a stillborn inside that building, that's when they realized the children to the fairgrounds Put that concentration camp. That's what that's what convention hall became. A death Hall. Let me go back to your experiences, growing up in Tulsa. This is the Legacy literally of your family's your ancestors. Wasn't taught in high school, wasn't there, some kind of emphasis on Oklahoma education that would have brought folks to

this. I'm asking any of you in any of the three to jump on, this one is Jeff. You know, that in my high school there was nothing about Greenwood or Black Wall Street. History is a required course. In high school has made it a habit of three of what happened Why was this never mentioned in? During that time, you had to face the very people who murdered your family work and see these people all the time. So you didn't say anything. When it was out here. Same, same. I mean, the exact same. I have the exact same story. Christy has died. I didn't

learn about the massacre until I went off to college and I went to school, Greenwood Junior High. I went to Booker T Washington. High School, which was a school right there doing that time of the massacre didn't get burned down, but I went off to college Jeff and people from Chicago, Los Angeles, New York Detroit, would ask where you from? And I would say Tulsa, and they would automatically say, Oh, Black, Wall Street, Tulsa race. Riot had no idea. Somebody said that I went home and I said,

dad, what are these people talking about? And that's when I learned that, my great-grandmother, Rebecca Brown, Crusher had to flee in fear of her life. And she never. A word about it to us been in and I can't help but go back to that video. That was played at the outset of this panel watching those buildings burned. I can only imagine my grandmother trying to get out of Harm's Way. But yeah, we we, we took Oklahoma history, but all we learned about was the Trail of Tears. Not one iota, not one word, and

it's just so unfortunate and I think it's simple. Chief, do you think that this lack of Education? Was this a mistake? Was this? And I guess I'm being somewhat facetious, but it seems to me that this was purposeful. This was done deliberately. Well, for, for our people, for African people in that district and it was an act of survival. It was an act of. How do you how do you transcend Collective trauma? Right? You find some very productive ways to figure out how to how

to, how to transfer because the alternative It's something we don't even want to think about today. When you think about what you asked me, what would you do? If the response is always something very tracked, right? It's not just at this Ravine. So you have people who have children, who have families who had a whole Community. Who said we cannot, let's let's we got a, we got, we got to figure this out. Now, what is understand? the Ku Klux Klan thousands after the

massacre in the City of Tulsa alone, its membership grew Exponentially a group that I spent the entire year, the class of 1922 terrorizing the black community, because it happens. So they heard about people becoming politically about people who are talking about the massacre in any form of fashion. You can find yourself or you can find yourself, listen to ear. Is a body part because that was the custom. That was the practice of. We don't have to tell you to shut up, we're going to convince you to be quiet,

then you will help participate in the conspiracy. as you think about, What happened and we think about how the black community has tried to deal with this, as you said, she's coming up with different strategies of how you cope. The white silence on this issue comes from a very different place. Christy, have you thought about that? Why is it that white tolson's seem to be not only ignorant of this history, but unwilling to talk about it. You know, they know about it. They definitely know about it, they just don't care.

You know, it today what you see happening now, so who do care right, but there are a lot of people or white people who don't organizations committees to make money off of our oppression of what happened. And they want to talk about reconciliacion, they want to talk about healing, you know, they'll give you a fine, I'll give you a memorial. They don't want to deal with the real issues and he never talked about that. What are we hearing from? Why do people know? I don't believe it when they said that. They don't know at this point. Why? People know? They're very aware of what's going on

the news Facebook page, they know. well, it's it's interesting that I think when we go around America and general the parts of our anti black history that are not taught that are not a part of the education of our children that are not talked about in Social discourse, but are not talked about in the political halls in Washington, DC, avoiding talking about. Those things means that you don't have to think about what you need to do about them. And you talked about people who want healing and Reconciliation and before you have

healing, don't you have to have a reckoning For what happened before, you can heal from what happened. And so, what would that thought? I want to throw some things out to you and get your reaction. If I use the phrase, gold plated medallion. what do you think about when it relates to the way, the City of Tulsa has responded to what happened in Greenwood and their responsibility for what That's exactly what it is. That's exactly what it is. We are constantly

our sales. What am I, dating? What am I eating? That does not honor my ancestors. That does not my community. That does not honor my people. I'm afraid, we have to ask ourselves. What are we accommodating? What are we celebrating? That does not honor. Our ancestors. Does not honor our people. I'm so, Tiffany, I see you're like ready to jump. Please Jump. Right In Here. Christy has me fired up. You all have me fired up this gold medallion, you know, that's all the survivors received.

They were survivors that fought until their last breath for reparations for restitution for atonement for what happened to them and 1921 and they made it to the US Supreme Court and they decided to close the case because the statue of limitations that ran out but they gave him a gold medallion. I can't help but think about the last that the three last known living survivors here in Tulsa, with us today, who survived the worst racial Tara atrocities in this country, in this nation. And

They've received no justice like Chrissy said, you know we're getting ready to encroach on the Centennial. The 100 year anniversary of the 1921 race Massacre and all you hear about is what's getting ready to happen in and how we're going to make this a tourist attraction it and I think that is just appalling because, right now, it Demario solomon-simmons who's leading a lawsuit on behalf of those. But the survivors, he says that this is not a tourist attraction Wall Street. The community of Greenwood is

still a crime scene. And ancestors are still crying out from the soil. Can't remember me because it was erased from the history books. And we have a duty as Christie said, black people who are descendants of survivors to right, that wrong, and honor and remember, Also fight like hell to get Justice for these women who are a hundred and six years old mother, lessee be random mother Fletcher, and her baby brother, who is 6 months old at the time then? They

should be the center, they should be honored, it shouldn't be about a History Center, shouldn't be about Legacy Fest, it shouldn't just be about that. It should be about making sure that we honor them and that we seek compensation for the victims that survived. And so that's the only way we get to a place of reconciliation and true healing and it starts with accountability and restitution. There is no parent in America, who would say to their child. You have done wrong but we're not going to talk about that. Just come here and let me hug you because I

just want to get to reconciliation and healing in America that would not talk to their child and have a reckoning of the child understands what was done wrong. So, that it won't be repeated if I have to come to you for a second because one of the most chilling moments when we were filming in Tulsa. Was when you and Christy and I were in the cemetery Oaklawn cemetery. And you were talking about the number of people that cannot be accounted after the massacre. Could you say again? What that

number was I will I really need to deal with this Medallion at 2 please. Medallions one of those tokens. I'm sitting here listen to all of this, and I thought to myself, can you imagine giving the victims of the Twin Towers medallion I'll give him the victims of the Oklahoma City Murrah building bombing a medallion but no compensation. In each of those cases do with compensation, they had a victim's compensation fund. For the bombing domestic soil. But I think that that is something that divides people. Brought us together. When the Twin Towers fell,

it brought us together. When the mirror built-in stay off my grandfather, looked at that coin, when he got back home and he said, what am I going to do with this shit? Mike and I felt he played it, it's not even real gold. On behalf of those. 15000 people that lived in the Greenwood District that minifigure only 10,000 because of a census report, we barely fill out the census today so we know the numbers are if you have documentation that 6000 people were

cared for or looked after, Then what happened to the other four thousand. Let's go with the lowest number 10,000. People what happened to the other four thousand? Let's just say a thousand Weibel to run for their lives and make it out of the city even though they have the whole Get out of the Advance on the 31st, you didn't get out. What happened to those four thousand people are 3000. We just hypothetically saying a thousand got away. So you got you got you

got you still have a few thousand left there on the counter for a chief. Don't we know something about accounting for them because of the discovery of evidence of mass graves in Tulsa. I can do you better than that. We started with a dozen. The first report was a dozen that number went to Saturday. Then we went to a hundred today were talking about 300 with no evidence, right? Like who puts the number at 300? How do we go from 100 to 300? And how do you account for that? The records that show

us? That we are 300, where is the evidence for the other? Thousands are You see this conspiracy of Silence continues and that's why I use the term Holocaust. That's why I use the term ethnic cleansing and genocide because that's what we are talking about here. When I stood in that grave, remember the oversight committee and I still have that ground. And I looked at that little bitty Box about the size of a shoebox or coffin in a cemetery, not even didn't see for a baby. They didn't even have the dignity to sign their death

certificates by a physician. They had a Layman find the death certificate, they didn't even involve the body's. They threw him in Wood boxes and then put them in a trench. Where's the humanity in that? I see why I needed to keep it a secret. Because to expose that level of inhumanity to, man, in the whole world would have to respond to what has happened in Tulsa? Because the whole city of Tulsa is a great yard, Chief Keef. I was just thinking about, you know, what she said, and then they keep scowling reconciliation as if

you have reconciliation after what you just described, you know, it's crazy and it's just, it's so it's manipulation because it right now but they don't, you see, all these organizations that is just about, they're not they're not talking about investments into the community. You're not talking about reparations, you're not talking about policy has become a national program that you program. Black, people are hurting on a program job, all the stuff right now because so many jobs that will be locked. Show

me. It's a we have to watch black leaders framework of racial of racial. A lot of this check for well, if you know this Here's the thing that there is there is no race of people that has ever existed on Earth that didn't have members that could be moved by money and personal gain. And so this is this is like, you know, meet the new boss, same as the old phone, how do you talk about this? How do you reclaim The Narrative of Black Wall Street and and what happened as a

community reclaim that and what part does a reparations lawsuit play in. the first part of that, we have to start to develop our own level of authority as black people, and we have to stop If we're going to reclaim our narrative, I truly believe that lie ahead and pass on the doctor. Crutches at your spot, your spot a hun. We definitely have to come together collectively as a community. And I think we are with this lawsuit that we just filed last fall. We have so many people whose come together instead of nothing is enough. And as you all said, you're going to have certain groups of people who

who are just comfortable, who's afraid of getting uncomfortable. But but we have a four-point plan, and in that plan is to seek compensation for the survivors and the descendants of the massacre of first and foremost. Number two, is to actually hold the perpetrators accountable. Yes, you will hear, people say well, nobody is living that that did this but guess what? The entities that allowed it to happen? They're still here and there. Driving and they're capitalizing off of what happened. So the City of Tulsa uo Housing Development

Authority, uoc Sinclair Oil, you owe, you know, that and told the Tribune. There's so many entities that needs to be brought or held accountable. And then we want to make sure that we document and that we publicize the stories that were erased from the textbooks. You know, what we're eating right now. We've partnered with the Equal justice initiative, and Bryan Stevenson, and we started the Tulsa Community. Remember, its Coalition are? We went around collecting soil samples? From the very least I was going to ask you what? What's behind you could you just show? What's

behind you? Absolutely are. These are some of the soil samples right here. I don't know if I'll stand up so you all can see. But right here, you see the soil samples of mr. Ruben Everett right here. This is a man. Lost everything. He had lost his, his his generational wealth, and they are building a History Center right on the land that he lived in and they're going to make money right on this man's land and in his story is so compelling because he lost everything. And so we want to make

sure that we remember and that we honor those lies and that we actually hold small ceremonies and memorials and funerals system. Make sure they get those proper burials. The same with with the damask grades excavations. You know, if those remains are from the masker, we want to make sure that we give them a proper resting place because in my face, Jeff is simple for people to to not have a proper Memorial. And so that's what we're doing. We're going to publicize and record the stories. And then number for, we want to tell the truth.

That's how you control the narrative by telling the truth. Right now, people are trying to whitewash people trying to pretend because we're getting ready to to to come up on this this anniversary for what people need to really understand about salsa Oklahoma. It's the same salsa because we are the only city in the United States of America, that removed. a black lives matter mural from the street in Greenwood in Greenwood And the people who are saying they want reconciliation and coming together are the same. People that said, take that off the

street, in Greenwood supposed to invest millions of dollars into a commemoration. But you want the mayor of utter the words? Black lives matter. It is a farce. And so as a community we have to we have to actually ancestors the way that they should be honored and we're not going to let them whitewash or water down. What happened to my great-grandmother's community, what happened to Lessie? Be Randall, mother Viola, Fletcher, and Van Hughes Ellis. We have to get good at controlling the narrative

and telling the truth. And also talking about the continue, the continual harm of what's happening to The Descendants right now. And so Tulsa olds. And so there are several things that that I have heard. Number one, this Centennial commission. It sounds like there is a reason to suspect whether this commission is interested in instituting something that would actually address the legacy of what happened in 1921 or whether they just to have a party that I shouldn't

say party. I'm not trying to be flipped whether they just want to have a memorial on the hundredth anniversary that will sell some T-shirts and and and have some other kinds of impact like that. Jeff. Huawei. 100 years to do it. If that's freaking simple hundred years. What's significant about 100 Years of Oppression of Injustice of denial? What is it? A chance of why we wait 100 years to do what you could have done a hundred years ago, 10 years ago, Yesterday. Like, what do you want me to have you been waiting for?

Reveals the motive, it revealed the sentence. It is basically qualifies everything. These two women just said everything is so big in front of you, and if I were Survivor, I would be asking a significant part of such a grand scheme. In any of those activities section and doesn't that speak volumes that speaks volumes about what is going on. I want to do this cuz we are we're going to come to the end of our time but I want to make sure that we do a couple things. Black Wall Street. Memorial.com just one long word, Black Wall Street

memorial.com place. You can go for information. If people are able to travel as the vaccine rolls out and travel become safer. And you are now thinking I want to go to Tulsa, to try and learn more about what happened here as opposed to going to a t-shirt shop or someplace else. Try the real Black Wall Street tour, Chief, and Christy will take you and your family and demonstrate for you. What actually happened there, the Terence Crutcher Foundation is a critical

part of the movement in Tulsa, for restorative justice and Doctor Crusher. I just want to say to you. I know you left your practice, you started this Foundation to make sure as you told me that your brothers. When was never forgot and that what could be done in his legacy to improve Tulsa would be there, there is a lawsuit going on and I will ask one of you. Is there a website where folks can go to get information about the lawsuit? Justice for Greenwood. Org. Justice for Greenwood. Org.

Mmm, the last thing that I want to suggest and I will say I'm suggesting but in talking to Chief and Christy and, and Tiffany. You can message the mayor of Tulsa. And tell him what you think about his position that a true Reckoning with what happened in 1921 would divide the community as opposed to build the foundation for what could really be called reconciliation. Send a message to the mayor of Tulsa you can find an email address and tell him Mister mayor, it's time for Tulsa to do better. Chief Christy. I want to

thank you all so much. I want to thank you for the work that you were doing in Tulsa for your community. I want to thank you for my personal education about something. I started talking about when I read about it but I didn't truly understand until I came to Tulsa and talk to you first. Your fight is righteous, your cause is just and we will be with there with you with the who we are project going forward. Thank all of you so much for what the joint we appreciate it. Thank you.

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