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Raising the Bar: Accelerating Diversity in Music | SXSW 2021

Liliahn Majeed
Chief Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging Officer at Universal Music Group
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SXSW 2021
March 19, 2021, Online, Austin, USA
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Raising the Bar: Accelerating Diversity in Music | SXSW 2021
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About speakers

Liliahn Majeed
Chief Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging Officer at Universal Music Group
Tiffany R Warren
EVP, Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer at Sony Music
Rashad Robinson
President at Color Of Change
Valeisha Butterfield-Jones
Chief Diversity, Equity & Inclusion Officer at The Recording Academy
Dr Maurice A Stinnett
Global Head of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion at Warner Music Group

Liliahn Majeed is the SVP, Chief Diversity, Inclusion and Belonging Officer at the Universal Music Group where she promotes innovative and diverse recruiting and retention programs for artists, fans, team members and partners. A 15-year veteran of the National Basketball Association’s (NBA) team marketing and business operations group, she developed meaningful community programming as the Vice president, diversity and inclusion for the NBA.

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As Executive VP, Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer for Sony Music Group. In this newly created role, Tiffany will expand equity and inclusion activities and policies across of all Sony Music Group's (SMG) global recorded music, publishing and corporate divisions, reporting directly to SMG Chairman Rob Stringer.

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Rashad Robinson is President of Color Of Change, a leading online racial justice organization. Driven by more than 1.4 million members building political and cultural power for Black communities, Color Of Change is creating a more human and less hostile world for all people in America.

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Global business leader and diversity and inclusion expert with 16+ years of fresh, transformational leadership delivered to Fortune 100 companies, Presidential administrations/campaigns and public and private sectors.An authentic, trusted leader with deep subject-matter expertise and the ability to meet growing business demands while delivering world-class, proven diversity and inclusion programs.Demonstrated ability to build, improve, and lead inclusion and belonging at scale across hiring, retention, progression, culture and CSR verticals with business responsive strategies and measurable results.

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Dr. Maurice A. Stinnett is a member of WMG's senior management team, responsible for worldwide diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives. Reporting to the CEO as an Executive Officer.Before joining WMG Dr. Stinnett was the first African American male Vice President of Diversity and Inclusion for an NBA team - the Brooklyn Nets. Upon his departure the Brookyn Nets honored him by appointing him their second Diversity, Inclusion and Community Engagement Ambassador.Dr. Stinnett brings over 15 years of experience in diversity, inclusion, equity, social justice and multicultural education. Dr. Stinnett uses his extensive business, management, and planning skills to ensure high-quality diversity, equity and inclusion programs and efficient business practices for all stakeholders and institutions.

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About the talk

The panel will evaluate how inclusive the music industry is at this time across race, gender, age, and across all genres of music, highlighting the good, the bad, the ugly. Immersed in the day to day, music leaders on the panel will take a step back and discuss the most surprising and least surprising DE&I insights from within their organizations and their communities. The panel will discuss what’s working and what can be improved across the industry. They will identify which steps/initiatives can be adopted by all music organizations right now and in due time, focused on how to make a more inclusive future of the music industry.

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SXSW dedicates itself to helping creative people achieve their goals. Founded in 1987 in Austin, Texas, SXSW is best known for its conference and festivals that celebrate the convergence of the interactive, film, and music industries. An essential destination for global professionals, this year’s online event features sessions, showcases, screenings, exhibitions, professional development and a variety of networking opportunities. For more information, please visit sxsw.com.

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Hello. I'm Richard Robinson president of color of change. Our racial Justice organizations driven by over 7 million members, black folks and allies of every single race. And I am so excited for this conversation. I went to first and foremost Bank on South by Southwest for bringing us together, color change and the recording Academy recently made a commitment to bring racial Justice and Equity to the music industry. And together, we release change music, a road map, which offers industry-leading tangible ways to address

in equities within their organization. This is just the first step on the road to actually, bringing more equity for black Creator and to the industry, the undeniable Influence of Music on our country is so clear. And so we're going to get to work on a conversation and we We have for incredible leaders within the industry. And within the industry of diversity, that are going to sort of, take us through this, I am going to just go through, if you can brief introduction, and then we're going to, we're going to get to work. Alicia.

Butterfield, Jones has spent over twenty years driving change at the intersection of entertainment politics and Tack ship currently chief of diversity, equity and inclusion at the recording Academy, Alicia formerly served, as the global head of inclusion for Google, deputy director of public affairs for the international trade in the Obama Administration, and the National Youth boat director for Obama for America helping to deliver one of the highest youth voter turnout in American history, delete it off my mom wife and author.

Tiffany are Warren. I'm a heart director and passionate hope dealer Tiffany. Are we? Is the EVP Chief diversity and inclusion officer at Sony, music, group, and founder of add color recognized. As a leader in the field of diversity, Tiffany is a talented strategist with over 22 years of championing, diverse professionals and the creative Industries. You must have started when you were five Tiffany, Maurice Bennett is an experienced leader of an expert in the areas of diversity, inclusion, and Equity across, corporate nonprofit and education, sectors. He serves as Global head

of diversity, equity and inclusion at Warner Music Group there, he still has the equity initiative and Implement Taylor Stratton. I need a program designed to cultivate a diverse and inclusive company culture and Lily and Magid. Dedicate herself to promote Innovative and diverse programs throughout her spp. Chief, diversity inclusion and belonging role at Universal Music. Group's proud, Howard, Walt Disney World Four Season Hotel in NBA alarm and committed to ensuring her team

members artist songwriter stand and Community partner feel safe. Seen heard accepted and respected. Welcome panelist to the conversation. And thank you so much for joining. So I want to start off with the easy questions because we're going to get into some hard questions and I think that it's always good. We could have talked about these issues that are complicated issues that really steal from systemic challenges in our country. Systemic inequality, systemic racism book, the raisin which

Industries animate. Those things. I actually want to start not with the pain but with the joy can use. It also brings so much joy to color changing. We talk about black Joy, a lot. We Center black joint so much of our organizing black. Joy is not the absence of pain but the presence of aspiration. Not just what we are fighting against but what we are fighting for and I love it if each of you could just as an icebreaker I'm so that maybe you could bring a little bit of your personality and filled with love and joy into the room, share an album or a song, or musical

moment. That's Represent joy for you. With Alicia and then we'll sort of go in the order of the introduction. First verse. I just want to thank you for a moderating. This very important discussion with my colleagues here today, who I have so much love and respect for. I'm so excited about the work that we've already been together and we hope to do and I love for sure that you're starting off of Joy during such a difficult time in our country. You know, many of us have been working from home or suffering through a pandemic, now, for nearly a year and just

all the things. And so, what brings me? Joy is the reminder that Joy has resistance, right? Nothing so often we carry the burden and attacks of the very heavy that work that we do around racial Justice and diversity, equity and inclusion in our industry, but also in the world. But you know, music has been the soundtrack of my life and I think it really has been a soundtrack from the other pandemics, nothing. So many people suffer. So many people, struggle, and even, you know, the loss of life. Over the last year, music has death, You been the thing that keeps me going to every Friday

night, me and our children just have a bit of a karaoke, kind of freestyle moment, and if so corny and cheesy. You know, where offbeat, we listen to whatever, you know, makes us feel good on those nights. And then I'll definitely say Friday, nights with our family with music has been like, bomb during such a difficult time. Delete. It's interesting that you ask a question and thank you for bringing joy into the room first and foremost for this conversation.

Actually, the score is celebrating 25 years. I had just posted about. You know, that catalytic album, I was in college when it came and it dropped and I had never heard anything like it and particularly, you know, two of my very best friend in life are Haitian. And so, what that album did, what were the Haitian Community, let alone, this college student, who sometimes it have a vocabulary to go with, with swag, you know, sometimes you get that swag from listening to music and to this day, Ready, or Not? Is the Anthem that I play? When I walk on stage at at the adcolor awards. So I

love ready or not killing stock. Anything from that album on, has had a tremendous impact on my life. So yeah, that would be the album that brings me joy. Rashad. I think I'm mixed up on the order of operation and thank you so much for a conversation with us first and foremost. What brings me joy. My joy is rooted in my faith. An apologetic Lee, say that my joy is rooted in the fact that it is not conditional and based upon circumstances Is Anchored In something greater than whatever I'm going through. And so, with that being said, the songs

that have been on repeat, Travis Greene and artists and he said, he has two songs out intentional and made a way. And those two songs of in the soundtrack that again, my faith, that everything is happening. It's intentional and it's all working for my good and made a way there. Whatever ice I'm confronting whatever is going on. I will get you there. So that's what brings me joy. The last but not least hanging out with these wonderful sisters on. Here are rashaud. I get a chance to meet with them once a month and that brings me joy. So that's what my joys. Oh

my gosh, Maurice. How do I follow that? Oh so beautiful. You bring a story as well. Domo. And this conversation we're just a few minutes it hadn't and I'm already feeling. So joyful hearing all of you kind of share your stories and I Echo so much of what all of you said is that joy and it's hard for me to not show me a little bit. When I say that word, because it plays such a powerful role, in our ability to thrive and stay kind of mentally tough regardless of what swirling around us. And I think, fortunately, I'm genetically wired towards joy, and I even named my daughter, her

name is Sarah, which means joy and in Arabic, and there so many songs that that bring me joy, particularly anything, Stevie Wonder, and India Arie. So, like I dance like no one is watching every time someone puts on airs by Stevie and I start my day with India's a beautiful day and I meditate I did that just before this conversation to us. I am like so looking forward to more joy in this conversation. Thank you all for having us. That was so great. I appreciate that. You know, what was really great about that is all of that, sort of talent and creative

uplifted. And in those example, I want to actually pick up there. You know, each of you are in your first year in these roles and so an opportunity to like really talk about the future and the past boring. So I really do want to focus on this unique space music and racial Justice. And a lot of times when people, I'm categorize music, they will pigeonhole. Black artist contribution into black music and when reality American music is black music. I color change. We talked a lot about not. Mistaking

presents for power. You know, when we missed a present for power, we can sometimes take we've done some That we haven't done. It's not that present is a bad thing if that's presence. Alone doesn't actually change the rules. We can say that because America loves and celebrates sometime. Artists are created all our talent, right? In America can love celebrating monetize black culture and not like, and sometimes hate black people at the same time. And so what does it mean? For each of you we're going to go the opposite way that we just went. So get ready

Lillian. What is it mean to be inside an industry that had built its foundations from black genius, lack creativity, black brilliant. But in some time and often times not only spiteful black weird but stalled and sometimes stolen from me and prevented black Innovation. How do you talk? How do you think about moving forward? Lily-ann. Sorry, for the mispronunciation and you can call me little too. Everything that you just described. I think really talks about the obligation and speak to the obligation that we have in these roles that we are in the car monthly

conversations that that we all have is very clear that none of us have taken on these roles to be just pretty window dressing to just check the box and allow our institutions to say yet we have diversity inclusion of a log and group so we're good. It's like we are here to really Drive unintended sins on this conversation to dry Drive change and and a lot of what you spoke to really speaks to the fact that like music is always in the stool for Black Liberation and in our artists and are song writers and are producers, they wield so much power and influence and so

it is obligating like it is Our obligation to make sure that we are using that power to really Drive change. And so some of the things that I'm really focused on Absolutely internally. And looking at how we can be a force for change. For us to see many many, many more than there currently are black and brown a heads of labels. But I also believe we have this amazing responsibility to, to the world, to its it, to serve as a bridge to creating a more just Society, where social and economic outcomes are not influenced by circumstances into which people are born

or raised where race and gender and class, and sexual orientation. Any other points of difference are no longer obstacles to success. So those are a lot of the conversations that I know that we are all leaving, about the responsibilities that we have to make sure that there are many more black Executives like us at the label, but there were also using our power and our influence to change it to change the world. Not just today, but many many, many hundreds of years into the future. And I think you said that in the direction the

opposite direction. So we'll shop, that was actually a fantastic. Let me add to that. I think I want to start off by saying you ask about this particular industry in the music industry. Richard, I first would like to say that it's no different than working in any industry in America. I don't know of any industry in America that hasn't done, what we said those things and hasn't been built on again, exportation of black genius, like kind of loving black folks, and I really honoring the black body. So, I feel the sacred responsibility. As black people, we've always known the Gathering

about black genius, like, a pretty black girl, Ian, but we've known about that exploitation and appropriation in his treatment. So, as far as my role is, now, I feel like I carry the responsibility to shine a light on both those realities, right? But also to dream and to reimagine and to disrupt. So I guess what I'm saying? And ingest is that I need to make sure that I am damn sure that I'm occupying space. For these folks in these spaces that we have not, historically been allowed to occupy. And that I act fearlessly to disrupt in the industry, added to disrupt again, into

dislocating, to bring, agitation to, for all those brilliant black, folks now and that are to come. So I think that's my responsibility. Thank you, Doctor mow. And will you know why I came from an industry, which unfortunately contributed to a lot of stereotypes, that fed the way that America these people call her. And I had to go to Grapple with that as one of the first Chief diversity officer is within advertising, and I'm acutely aware of how long it takes to brake systems that people are very used to benefiting from

And so one of the key things for me is that it's really important. Now that particularly allies stop playing, you know, being tourists so just watching what's going on, but not participating, activating not being part of the change and I see part of my job as collaborating and supporting their Journey so that we can make better decisions on behalf of artists. Now and artists that we don't even know if I take this word, very, very seriously and I think that, you know, one of them is a half and spectacular with CDO, isn't in. This position is a, a lot of it is misunderstood, but

all of the individuals on this, call are sitting at the head table of your organization, their understanding, the business impact of diversity, equity, and inclusion. And more importantly, they're getting daily read on what the business is doing because you cannot operate in a space of being a chief, diversity officer, and not know how where the business is going, you know, particularly with the launch of the national museum of African American music and I think many of my partners on the phone or in Hannah Hannah on the piano are involved in. There is a way for to teach the history

that was not taught in school about the contributions of black artist to country, music to American Music In general. So, you know, sometimes there's a thought process of our responsibility rests firmly in HR when I responsibility rests in every business unit Talent acquisition, you know, HR definitely is, and what people see first and foremost, but there's Learning and Development. There's other key areas of the business that we all have our hands in and collectively. If we do, make a change in those various business units, we can uplift the whole company and let alone not just the

company, but the industry and then our artists. So, you know, I'm super hungover to buy the responses from Lil and dr. Mo and of course, Felicia and the sense that we all feel happy responsibility that were in the middle of making history and that our appointments are historic no pressure. But, you know, being that this is my third first job. Meaning the third time, I've been the first to do something. I want to spend time. Obviously, it's important to celebrate the first, but I want to spend time creating equity and inclusivity, so we can celebrate the next I'm going to talk about that

later, business case for diversity. I think, you know, no longer is d. I a nice to have for any industry, but particularly music, but it truly is a business imperative, you know, even if we talk numbers for a moment, we look at, you know, R&B and rap song by combined control, you know, more than 33% of the overall market share music as an example. If you look across business, according to Forbes whenever a company gets diversity equity and inclusion. Write their revenue goes up by at least 19%. And so, I'm so excited about this

class has of Chief diversity equity, and inclusion officers here because each of the labels. And as long as we say and Reporting it, right? We understand business and we also care about our communities. And so, you know, I don't know that there could have been a better time than right now to really get into Focus. The work that needs to happen. The truly Drive change in a measurable and tangible way. The last thing I'll say, is that it's systems work and have you touched on it. But, you know, the equity part of what we do that. So many of the

viewers now, don't see. I mean every day requesting data, every day we're doing data analysis, across every birth of our business, to identify opportunities, in gaps, to make sure they were, we're bringing a new voices. We're making sure the artist will be recognized for their work, and we're making sure that not only are, we hiring diverse communities during them is vendors. Are so really thinking about the entire picture and how we're driving change is critically important and so just thank you Rochelle for the I think systems change is where you're going to see the real action. And

actually one of them going to get more I want to order system change on the line. And have you found some of the demystified, some of the things that you all are looking at, the people have a better idea of what the world looks like, and if people didn't catch it, right? You folks are not only inside of organizations that I'm done with, which our competitive switch amplify. But they're talking to one another. They see each other and Ally in this world, they are sharing strategies and thinking about how to build with the

recognition that success in this space is going to require all of these organizations to be successful and when I think when something is good lunch place maybe folks are learning from it. And so I I love I'd love that and before we get to the sort of numbers before I want to, I want to talk about something that, you know, a lot of people have brought up to me, right? You know, this and this summer a racial Justice became majoritarian, I'm just going to clean it right around folks are not the majority of

the people that showed up in the street up, 6th, and voter registration. All of the ways in which many people bought the best we could do in terms of activism with class outside of our windows or uplift. Investigative journalism but it was racial Justice and move people into the streets and push mini Corporation many businesses to say things. We never imagined, they would say, to make a statement of support in to speak out about what they were willing to do to both right past wrongs, and to sort of move forward with that was the

heat of the summer. And now we are in the Hold up the winter. And whenever that sort of shift happens by we we experienced a sort of like, maybe folks having Amnesia in the winter time forgetting, maybe the things they said in the summer, maybe, as opposed to making good on those commitment, they sort of, maybe don't realize what they actually got himself into a part of your job did. Actually helping people make good on helping a move from rhetoric to action, until I'd love it. If it may be a doctor mobile start with you on this one and

I love it. If each of you can talk a little bit about what some of those challenges that you're sort of sensing, some of the sort of dynamics that is required to move an overt move, a spare always happens when we can get statements of support that. I actually need to be implemented to be real. Richard. That's a great question. And I think from me, I would say our first commitment must be to honesty. And to me, that's our biggest challenge in the DIY world. I don't know if folks are really ready, Rashad, to be honest. And this work

requires honesty about ourselves, our position, our history, and our institutions, often times, I discovered were terrified of truth-telling about these things. Even for those who truly want to get it right, are you really willing and they're not typically willing to risk getting it wrong, right? And that's the challenge, we must be willing to endure the discomfort to change. And I think if we're honest about the realities and we know them that action must follow and that's also what terrifies us, right? So the true telling him into action, if our success think about is do the people who we

have mistreated, it is our responsibility to reconcile that harm, right? And that might require us giving up something whether it's money position or power. And I don't know if there are Many people who are really ready to do that. The cost of transformation, the true cost of including the cost of equity. The question is, are we really ready to pay it or just to talk about it? And so I think that's what that would be where I focus at and truth-telling and getting us comfortable with that healthy tension. I want a big back in then we get to the numbers in the metric. I'd love it. If you

could expand on that who wants to jump in, so I don't have to call on anyone. I guess I'll jump in. Okay, now I want to piggyback on what the doctor most said. In the sense that I think, what I want to provide the audience with his with an analysis that you do. I use very often and I'm particularly when I'm confronted with something as traumatic or something that's less traumatic, but there's good and there's bad trauma and reconciling the history of multiple corporations and how they benefited from a black intelligent black creativity. I'm

requires all of us to take a personal audit and that's what I asked most of the allies with, in music group in any when I talk to to do. And so I think when George Floyd happened with people that immediately was, they knew what the problem was. They saw it with their own eyes and what people did it move to is understanding the root cause other than what we just saw with our own eyes. And so what they went to, which is what you naturally go to. As humans as we wanted to express our sympathy and ours, and our sadness and to some extent sympathy sympathy. It's not reaction. And so the problem

was identified, nobody really took time to understand the root cause they kind of glazed over that part. And they went immediately to saying I have empathy. And so with that empathy and was taken squares were blacked out, commitments were made, people were hired teams were built and it was a Reawakening and a rediscovery of a discipline that goes back to the 60, you know, because our timeline particularity. And I did not start last May as, you know, Rashad and all the work that you do. And then, you know what happened was they skip straight to strategy without any empathy and

without understanding the root cause and the strategy was in some cases, very performative which is unfortunate and all of us on this this call have been in moments and part of our careers have probably been invested in, you know, companies or or systems that were performing it but now we're in the era of action and accountability and I'm so proud. Why? Because Jen ex was like we're here this were ready and then why I was like oh we've been ready, we're in the street. So you have multiple Generations who are now kind of coming together to make the change of the promise.

That was given to us, you know, when the Civil Rights over and now we're in 2.0 and I'm finally end and Doctor know you touched upon. This is what sacrifice are people willing to make to make the real change? And that's what is the personal sacrifice? And what's the professional sacrifice. Sometimes you have to walk away from opportunities because you know, exactly why you're being called and sometimes you have to run to Opportunities because you're creating a making history. And so I think, you know, I've been around moments that have become movements, you know, I've been in the

thick of it for leashes, been in the thick of moments, that have become movement and it, it is hard work. And I know the word time is a trigger for a lot of people, but in order to get this right in some cases and and Rashad, you notice with your work, you hope to benefit from the changes that you're making, but you go Went to it. With a sense of I might not benefit from the changes that I'm making it smell. So, everytime I might not benefit from the changes that I'm making, but I'm going to make sure that future generate generated benefit from the changes that I make it. And sometimes it

takes a short amount of time to make the changes and sometimes it takes a generation, but I hope because of what's happened in the last year. We get to that finish line of equity faster, and I know that with, you know, my colleagues. Now, on this panel, we will do so I am eat. You all are, I'm just so inspired and this conversation continues to make me feel so honored that we are on this journey together because I just kept saying amen. Amen, amen to everything that, that both of you were saying, I know. But Lisa is about to drop some Jewels 2 in a

second. I'll say, Amen in advance to quit, but she's about to stay, but I can't like Echo enough. And, and the National Treasure is Bryan Stevenson talks about a lot of of what Tiff and and modus and it after modus said, is that liked, is that we have to commit to truth-telling. First, we can't just jump to the reconciliation. We can't just jump to reparation or with restoration until we're ready to tell the truth and we're still in a bit of a denial about our history. That's why it's it's it's like we want to just jump to strategy because that will allow

us to avoid the difficult conversation about how we got to hear how the rich and successful weekend Rich and successful was off of the black, the backs of black people. And so, one of the actions I think that we are working to take her, I'm working to take is getting our Executives comfortable, having these types of conversations and that coaching them on how they lead conversations about race within within their own individual teams. Because we have to be able to normalize the conversation about race and make it less of a taboo subject for

us to get to, to the actions. I know you said you're going to get sick to stomach a little bit later. So I don't want to steal your thunder. But like we can't talk about action without talking about the systems level changes that we, we have to make, and how we can kind of steak our system than our structures. They just can't operate as they have in the past, but it's uncomfortable and virtually impossible to be a racist or sexist or homophobic, or a hater of everyone that I think. Also part of the action is Embedding into our performance appraisal systems in Bedding into are hiring practices

and bedding into who how stretch assignments are, are distributed cetera, these type of things that and actions, that ensure that we get to Equitable outcome. So there's this true telling and we have to get our Executives comfortable, leading conversations about truth. And then there's this systems-level work that we have to do to really embed a lot of the actions that we know will get us to not just Equity justice. So that everybody has that we level the playing field for everyone for us to really see that the enduring and Lasting change that we want.

Lil and thank you for that. And thank you also Tiffany for being so open and so vulnerable. I'm with us because that's what we do, right? I think it's important for us to know, just always be honest. Like doctor most said not only about the work that we do but how we're experiencing the work that we do because it's heavy and for me I think, you know, anyone watching has to embrace or even accept that we've entered a new normal. So just like the world, don't go back to normal after the pandemic, the world

won't go back to normal now after 2020. And so any company organization, music industry, professional, you know, watching I'll say that, you know, it's just time, you know, it's actually past due time for us to really get this work. Right? Inform me that centers around doing doing the real systems work that we're talking about here and Rashad back to your question, I think we just have to keep this same energy, same momentum, and hold ourselves and each other accountable. That's actually why I love the work of color change because

accountability is just built into your DNA and what you do and your business model and is so need it, right? I think so often we want to just accept the status quo but even as deija officers that I hope, you know you all you know get to know us and eventually trust us because we've earned that trust. We still also want to be held accountable, right? Like we don't want to waste the seat. Copier is to actually drive changed. And if at any point I feel like I'm no longer useful or able to drive change or maybe my work here is done. I will get out the way for the next person

because that's what it's about. It's not about I or any of us individually, what really about driving real generational transformation and Industry transformation. And so in short, I'll say that It would be a mistake, I think, for any organization to fall into the temptation of this, going back to normal, right? Or two. Like bury your head in the sand because maybe you're grappling with the right words to say, or the right thing to do, but I would just say be courageous right now. Especially when you have us here like you can call us anytime.

And we would love to have the conversation around, how to navigate this very critical time to rent. Really appreciate that, you know. Since the summer, a lot of folks have said, I just didn't know Rashad, I just didn't realize structural racism, you don't even act like, you know, I'm going around talking about you all the time so it can be frustrating. Reaction me, my second reaction is so what did you think? What did you think? When you saw a rooms of of the folks in charge, that did not

look like the people doing the work? What do you think about that when you looked at any quality or systems that were unequal and you didn't see Injustice, what did you say? Did you believe it was a meritocracy or did you believe it was something else? And oftentimes wonder that because there's so many stories that we tell ourselves in this country about any quality oftentimes that make any quality unfortunate like a car or a sort of just happened rather than on just right and do an inequality and bring those unfortunate rather than just we end up with charitable

solutions to structural problems, right? We end up finding water bottles to plant instead of cleaning up the pipes service days of inner-city schools, instead of changing public education, we will save black. People are less likely to get a Loan from the bank instead of saying banks are less likely to give loans to black people, right? We will say black folks are less likely to get hired or brown. Folks are women are less likely to get hired at a senior level positions in the music industry rather than the music industry has excluded. So from those positions right on one hand we did

financial literacy programs or mentorship only. And on the other hand we get people looking at the systems and structures that it exploded. This is not to say that. Miss Tricia programs are not something that we should do but it's when we only try to fix the people instead of fix the system, so that gives me to the system's, right? And so yes, we have to have a strategy to get there that involved, Truth, and Reconciliation transformation, all of those things, but people who needs to some change, will never tell you when they actually are ready for

system change and no system is ever Change to have. Had you done so without pushing and without challenging I want to make this really famous and whoever wants to jump, I don't know if Tiffany you've jumped in first yet, but I might go to you, but my question really is and maybe each of you can share something specific to the organization your and knowing that you fit all been there less than a year and knowing that there's some similarities and I'd love it. If each of you could go to share a little bit about

what your traffic, what are the indicators that? But if you're looking at, what are you trying to for ground, in terms of what success looks like? Because diversity and inclusion can be a thing that's hard to track. And if I'm being very honest, they're supposed to in my, my industry in the act in this world who are sometimes, look at the varsity cleaning That's the thing that they could have put me put in front of us before they do the next. Me, what? I'm so excited about with you, all its next-generation leaders, in the diversity to Yokes and all

the way that you're already talking about this thing. I see you all. Is that the inside of both to our outside folks, to folks who are going to be our partners and don't talk to talk to the people are watching, what are the thing that you're uplifting? What will, how will we know what success looks like? Or anything else about the numbers in the metric that you think people should know that. With you? Sure I'm actually going to send your words back to you because any time you've spoken in the past I have taken feverish notes Rashad and it's something you just said. I I looked

it up quickly if my nose cuz I have no it's going back till like 2012. But you said something really, really powerful and you kind of alluded to it. About presence is not eat. Power and how, you know, the doubt is that we tell ourselves about the story of black people. The story of Hispanic people, the story of Asian people, actually emboldened racist and systems to exclude and policies to exclude. And you said that several years ago, and it never lets me. And I, and I, I had to go back to those notes, but more importantly, I think in terms of tracking, if we're

successful, the things that we and that I've set up the tour to focus on is the things that I'm hearing, you know, sort of, in my listening time cuz I really only been on the job for four nights. I mean, you know, I think generally when you're building a foundational exercise around diversity equity and inclusion, you give yourself a little bit more time, but, you know, it feels like we're at. We don't have the time and I did speak about that. A little earlier Mobility is really, really important. I've heard that across-the-board perfectly within the industry is the mobility of black

Executives because You see the the the output in terms of artists and R&B and Hip Hop? But there's a gap between what's on the inside and I have to quote, my my, my colleague is being Rashad who I had received do, I had an incredible conversation with and he reminded me in this is really going to guide me that there's five jobs in front of the mic but there's 500 behind. And so it's how do we diversify those those jobs that are behind the mic so that we can see the diversity and the support and celebration in front of the mic? And when people think about the industry, you talk about the

demystification in talking about success, we were always artist adjacent. So I think part of our jobs to is to step not away from the artist but show success in different ways so that we can attract talent that we want to see you within all ranks. And I think the other pieces impact is how we treat communities outside of our companies. We've all established phones that are doing incredible work, around social justice. But now what the social Justice look like when it when it, when it comes to d&i. So what is that impact? When you are at the intersection of diversity,

equity and inclusion and see us are, you know, and then leadership, of course it's, it's in building and nurturing, our executive leadership and making sure that they're getting what they need. But also look at our emerging leaders who are coming up through the ranks and Equity, we talked about it a lot on his call, but pay Equity gender Equity. I know that many of us are met with white, you know? Why can't you focus on everyone? I've been met with that my whole career. I couldn't stand out in some cases of the black executive unless I stood out with everyone but in this time you do and

you've heard this before, this house is on fire so what are the policies and things that we're doing to, you know, put out this house fire. And I think finally just creating an environment of just safety that people feel psychologically, safe, environmentally, safe me to shot into the future and the present, the mass indifference Women feel and in some cases because of the data women of color were left out of that conversation. And so I think it's important and Alicia has brought this up many times data is so cute and a lot of cases in establishing these initiatives because sometimes data

itself is biased and we're left out. We're not considered because we get lumped in into gender or into stereotypical roles, do really understanding the data and using it as a tool to promote. All of the things that I just talked about his to me when I'm tracking the most. Alicia, I can jump in and save. Tiff is exactly where I am. And I'll add a layer around intersectionality. So really getting granular in the data, for example, you know, if we were to look at women over all, we may see one set of data and like things that we

need to start off. But then when you do it and intersection Ali by race and gender, specifically women of color, you will start see greater variance, right? So intersectionality thinking about creators of disabilities is an example. We're thinking about lgbtqia creators, and the list goes on to make sure that any marginalized or under represent a community. You know, we really have a deep understanding of what are what are those opportunities in gas that we need to be solving for? So, just to give you a glimpse into because every organization is different without the recording Academy. We are

a membership driven organization. Most known for the Grammy Awards and the Latin Grammys, but we also have music cares for Sample, this coming over 20 million dollars in covid relief. In the last year, we also have the Grammy Museum focused on preserving art in and music. And so you know, with all of them areas of our business, membership is really at the core and sell my analysis. Includes, you know, one representation understanding, you know, our leadership representation, we have our first African American man. Black man serving as a duel in a dual role of chairman of the board and CEO. Jimmy

Jam was the first chairman of the board. So important to note that you have, I'm so bored representation is something. I'm looking at staff representation, so although the analysis to talk about promo and Equity analysis, perfect performance, Equity analysis, but then also taking a step further around Supplier Diversity. So what are our numbers around? Me know, who were hiring, you know, across our work. And those businesses that we're investing in is a key part of the strategy Going to get membership really making sure that we have a thriving diverse super representative

membership base. And for us, that means not only based on all the areas. I just talked about the camera, right? We know, for example, as a black community, we are not a monolith. So making sure that black rock artist, Black jazz artist, black gospel artists, you know, country artists are really embedded in the strategy which is again why intersectional analysis is critical to make sure every voice within every Community is a part of the strategy. Billy Animo. Do you want to jump into anything that only piece I think? I would

add outside of the representation tracking bad? Intersectionality. A one thing I would have dumped his exclusion, often comes float as professionalism being said, right? I have to interrogate what our idea of professionalism is because that is limited Mobility. An opportunity for vast majority of and do my job is now coming from everything. My car leaving separate from the cultural standpoint to disrupt this idea of professionalism and ensuring that everyone can show up at their authentic selves and they are taking serious as professionals and given equal and

Equitable opportunity to occupy occupy space and that they have historically been denied. So I'm interrogating the culture and environment to disrupt again exclusion coming, close to his professionalism I love that in and out quickly combined everything that at the Tiffin police, you were talking about from a representation standpoint. And thus the safety with what mom was talking about with the with the exclusion piece is and Felicia knows when we had our first conversations as one of the things I complimented her on, from a previous role, is

an inclusion index. The one of the things I'm eager for us to create is an inclusion index could cuz my Northstar is getting getting our everyone in the organization to to a belonging instant or inclusion instant where you no longer have to like spend a lot of time thinking about whether I am inviting the right choices into the room, whether I am making sure that they are people who don't look like me and places and spaces where I am, but that it becomes instinctive. And so one of the ways that we, you know, that I'm hoping to measure it is this inclusion index which will probably be

like, a combination of how are we doing from a represent a In Sandpoint but also how well am I doing at making my my my colleagues feel psychologically safe cuz that would that were that to talk about that psychological safety, which I think is a key difference between inclusion and belonging is this feeling that I can stay and be whoever I am and and and bring up my different points of view and disagree, respectfully, with my colleagues without fear of Retribution. And that's why that is something that is so important that it was even in my intro with you. Was it the

intro of me that you made was shot. This is creating this, the space where everyone feels safe for the day, unapologetically unapologetically in consistently, unleash their super powers. That's what we want. That's how you get successful. That's how you achieved the business outcomes that believe she was talking about is when everyone feels safe to unleash their super powers and you don't feel that way until we have figured out how to create the sense of safety and the sense of belonging work. Don't feel like they are excluded. They feel like they are part of a family where they

accept I accepted, regardless of what they say, I love that, you know, I hope what people are seeing right now, right? There's always a lot of talk about policy change, but you don't have policy change about implementation without accountability without amplification, without all of this sort of structure that actually makes the aspiration or the changes that are announced real and what you're hearing, right? Is the sort of deep conversation about how does this actually they didn't have to operationalize excel and that's

sometimes, the message. The stuff that doesn't end up on in the newspaper. It doesn't end up on the stage at an award show, but it is easy. It is a space between words and actually Are A-Changin by Irma. And an end, whether were talking about the music industry were talking about Genie, Industries, on these conversations about meeting up the opportunity of a changing environment requires leaders on the inside and leaders on the outside. And, and and that brings me to sort of my next question. In terms of,

you know, you all can't do this alone. Yeah, you all are a brilliant. Talented folks are doing this work with pushing one made her choice to get rid of lead in this space but you need things from those on the outside. What are they are both in the industry or outside in the street from folks who Inside of your companies and for folks who your company's might be engaging. And as you think about sort of the road ahead and you think about the obstacles that we've talked about as the opportunity that we talked about, what are the

things that you are me? What are the sort of kind of backup that you are going to need? And we sort of a seek to collectively. Bring about a change in the music industry. And anyone can jump in here. I can say, I went to quick things. One is I need everybody to feel like their Chief diversity officer. I need every single person. It is their duty to their obligation to, to to reach out and find people of difference to be open to thinking again and revisiting their thoughts and being responsible for creating a belonging Instinct. So, that's one in the second thing I need is it is everyone to be

willing to put their social capital on the line and step up and speak up in the face of Injustice. I think I'll start with what the favorite thing that people like to say to me, which is, I hope one day, you're unemployed, people are out of a job Sunday because we're going to reach that finish line of equality. You're going to be unemployed. And so what I need people to do, first and foremost to stop, wishing unemployment on me. Secondly, what I would love is for people much,

like little said, is everyone should feel like diversity and Equity is their job. And I want to know very early on in my career. I purchased this sign from an estate sale and it said it just simply said white women and and colored women. So I knew where it came from right and I recognized pretty early in my career very early, like I wasn't in road then turn that the board rooms were no different than lunch counters in the sense that many of us. We're not allowed to enter through the front door in terms of backward and we had to figure out a different path to get there. And so I

want first and foremost for people to understand and know their history and how it impacts the present not that there's nothing, there's nothing new Under the Sun cuz people love to say that but there's patterns and they take on different forms. And so, I want people to be aware, open to learning, open to reading and informing yourself and being a better caretaker of our present in our future by knowing what what has happened in the past. Embarrassing to jump in a quickly again, we just everything. They've said we need everyone to show up. Speak up, use your platform. We need investors

to say we're not investing in till we see Dei commitment. Can we see two outcomes? We need artists and fans and say we're not going to engage and give you our money or Artistry. Our talent our treasure until we see boards and Leadership teams looking like who we look like we need an inside and an outside approach to have that Collective impact. That's how you can help us. I'll just end it and say partnership, you know, we can't do it alone. So like little said, act as an owner, you know, we want everyone to be, you know, the DEA officer in their space to make sure that you know we're

doing the right thing and in your organizations are doing the right thing but we can't do it alone. And so you know we're always here to have the conversations that need to be had. We're listening to make sure that we're doing the right thing and just you know let's lock arms and do this together. And so I'm really excited about how are crossed industry work where it would take us this year because I really believe that if we want to see real change happen, if you're not going to be, you know, within our silos are really by doing it together and that's why this conversation has

been so inspiring for me. Well, so I have one quick Final Answer specially since Tiffany, just talked about unemployment and this idea, right? I would like to like refrain although I do think about what would it need for justice and freedom to be here and maybe I could like start my hat and talking to Airline and and without with that said, right? Where we are squarely in the face of justice and that is a space where we are clocks Ali, passing the Baton writing. So, you know, if you left a note

on the desk as you leave on to the next thing, I knew the person coming behind you, what do you think? I'm that person needs to know about the work about the people about where we're heading into work. We're running out of time. So maybe some some, some quick lightning here. My would simply be, I believe you are enough. That job is going to make you feel inadequate that you haven't made enough games that you're letting down your community and other communities. And you're pushing too hard on other ways

but you are and you're talented. Brilliant and committed, stay with it. That's what I would say. I was mine. You're here for a reason, you're qualified or capable, you're able, you have everything that you need, so just stay confident when you get stuff. I mean, I would say and it's a pretty famous quote. You know, the crown is his bought and paid for. And that each of us are part of this, kind of oil. Quart of people that are just taking care of this, part of the timeline, I'm very sensitive to that I'm taking care of part of this timeline and that someone else will take care of the

next part. We are part of a long line of of Justice Warriors in in peacekeepers and Equity Fighters and you know I'd love the idea of your enough but just know that the crown is already bought and paid for. Yes, yes, yes, yes. I know some people to talk to him or her would be so much of your success or failure in this role starts up here and what we heard articulated, what you believe to be true about you. And unfortunately, we tell ourselves so many terrible stories and so

reprogramming, your brain to tell yourself that you are all of these things that that, that they just described and to tell yourself every morning to choose, Courage over Comfort because the be successful in this role is to be a little and afraid of losing your job cuz then you won't be pushing yourself enough. So tell yourself every single day today, I will choose courage over comfort and it'll be okay. I love how aspirational each of those answers were and how clear this conversation is about the work that needs to be

done. That we are not there yet and that we still have work to go and every battle needs protagonist. And when I'd hope all of us in this moment, they close our eyes and think about 10 15, 20 years from now, and who we want to be in the movie of this moment who we want to be as this story as we talk whatever we're doing now, is part of the story that will be told about us and in so many ways on that. Right? Is the opportunity ahead of you are at a label and agency a studio and you want to go to learn more about the roadmap, that the recording Academy color, change on how to put together.

We are engaging the industry around a road map that actually go to moves. These ideas, the rhetoric, the hopes and aspirations to very clear sort of things that you can do. I'm, you can go to color of change.org change music on the change music hashtag. Let me the place where you can put of engage around on this work. I'm continue to follow these incredible. I'm leader that they work on the inside and across the industry and, and support each other. In this change were Alicia

Dr. Tseung at Tiffany Lily, and it's been my honor. My pleasure to be in this conversation with you or let go out and make as much change on this possible. Thank you.

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