Events Add an event Speakers Talks Collections
 
Duration 56:58
16+
Video

Working at the Top All-Remote Companies: Automattic, Buffer & GitLab | Arc.dev Remote Career Summit

Zandy Ring
Director of Happiness Experience at Automattic
+ 3 speakers
  • Video
  • Table of contents
  • Video
Remote Career Summit 2020
June 25, 2020, Online, USA
Remote Career Summit 2020
Request Q&A
Remote Career Summit 2020
From the conference
Remote Career Summit 2020
Request Q&A
Video
Working at the Top All-Remote Companies: Automattic, Buffer & GitLab | Arc.dev Remote Career Summit
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Add to favorites
1.52 K
I like 0
I dislike 0
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
  • Description
  • Transcript
  • Discussion

About the talk

At the Arc Remote Career Summit 2020, leaders from top all-remote companies shared how their teams communicate and how they build and maintain company culture. They also shared what they look for in a job applicant, and their unique hiring and onboarding processes.

[Resources]

📝 Notes from this talk: https://bit.ly/6tAJZZQ

🌐 Remote Career Summit: https://bit.ly/RCS2020-event

[Speakers]

- Zandy Ring: Director of Happiness Experience at Automattic

- Kevan Lee: VP of Marketing at Buffer

- Darren Murph: Head of Remote at GitLab

- Hosted by Laurel Farrer: CEO and Founder at Distribute Consulting

[Learn More]

- Arc: https://m.arc.dev/yto

- Automattic: https://automattic.com/

- Buffer: https://buffer.com/

- Distribute Consulting: https://www.distributeconsulting.com/

- GitLab: https://about.gitlab.com/

Arc helps you effortlessly hire world-class remote engineers and teams. Trusted by fast-growing companies including Spotify, Hims, Fivestars, and more. Escape the local talent war with Arc.

00:00 Intro

00:50 Kevan Lee

01:30 Zendy Ring

02:10 Darren Murph

02:50 Laurel Farrer

03:43 Benefits of companies that panelists work

07:10 Daily operations in a company

10:20 Difference of distributing companies

13:10 Emotional sessions on workplace

14:33 About building trust

23:19 Relationship in a team. How to make communication perfect?

31:15 Three pillars

32:20 Practice Exercises

37:00 About passionate

45:50 Working and studying

47:00 Measuring performance

54:00 Last words

About speakers

Zandy Ring
Director of Happiness Experience at Automattic
Kevan Lee
Head Of Marketing at Oyster
Darren Murph
Head of Remote at GitLab
Laurel Farrer
CEO and Founder at Distribute

I grew up with the internet, but keep finding myself using it to get closer to people, not machines. I live in Olean, New York, with my husband, dog and twin toddlers. Joy is their standard mode, fortunately. I am the luckiest.

View the profile

I lead the marketing team at Oyster, where I set strategy, vision, and direction for how we build our brand, drive awareness, create demand, and position our product. Oyster is a mission-driven B2B SaaS platform for Distributed HR, purpose-built to close the global talent gap. Prior to Oyster, I led the marketing teams at Polly and at Buffer. I built out the marketing org for Polly, hiring the initial team and setting up strategy and operations. At Buffer, I led a team of 10 awesome marketers for a product that had 8 million users and served 75,000 remarkable brands. I helped Buffer grow from $5 million to $20 million in annual revenue; we acquired 100,000 new users per month and reached a monthly audience of more than 1.5 million. Along with my work at Oyster, I advise the Feedly team on growth and positioning, and I teach growth marketing in a degree program at Boise State University.

View the profile

Named an “oracle of remote work” by CNBC, I serve as GitLab’s Head of Remote. A visionary in organizational design, I lead at the intersection of people, culture, operations, inclusivity, marketing, employer branding, and communication. I've spent my career shaping remote teams and charting remote transformations. I advise and invest in global startups and serve as a remote work transformation consultant. I serve multifaceted teams across people, operations, and marketing functions. GitLab is the world’s largest all-remote company, with over 1,300 team members in 67+ countries with no company-owned offices. I hold a Guinness World Record as the planet's most prolific professional blogger. With over 10 million published words across all mediums, I leverage my expertise in editorial strategy, content marketing, and publishing to create sharp, impactful messaging for brands and platforms.

View the profile

As the Founder and CEO of Distribute, a virtual organizational development think tank and consulting firm, Laurel Farrer is an internationally-renowned thought leader on the topic of remote work. For the past 15 years, she has been unlocking the power of distributed workforces to create impact in corporate and socioeconomic infrastructures. She and her team of fellow experts collaborate with the world's leading businesses and governments on three primary topics: how to convert business operations from physical to virtual, how to build products and content for the remote work market, and how to leverage the workplace flexibility to solve global concerns. In addition to being a regular Forbes contributor, Laurel’s subject matter expertise has also been showcased by brands like Zoom, VMware, Gallup, Logitech, BBC, New York Times, Office Depot, and Fast Company, and Upwork.

View the profile
Share

We are going to be talking about the under the hood today, of of what it means to be a remote worker and and what the Dynamics that you can expect NFL a distributed team. And we seriously have the best of the best year for you to learn from these brands are tried-and-true and they are just the epitome of a great virtual operation. So you are learning from the absolute experts, I'm just to get to help you get to know these companies a little bit better. I'm going to ask each of our Palace to just introduced themselves as say their locations and describe their role in

their company. So Kevin do you want to pick us up? Great to be here with you. My name is Kevin Perez a social media management offer and we have been remote mostly from the beginning about six or seven years now. And I've been at the company for six years. Work as one of the foundations of our business really exercise at the receiving station. So we really do value. These cultural things that have become a part of our company. In remote work is right there. It's one of our, one of the things that's been most

important facet week when the team brought the company decided to share some things. With the next guy, I'm Dandy rang. I'm the director of Happiness experience that automatic automatic is a fully remote company and we have been since day one. I have been with automatics for seven and a half years and exactly like Kevin said we are we we prize remote work in finding the best people anywhere they currently are. We don't feel like you have to live somewhere, very specific in order to have an opportunity to have a high impact. Fantastic. Thank you so much. And

last but not least, Aaron ahead of remote, get lab has a project collaboration software development tool and we are all remote over 1,300 people in more than 67 countries and very similar to the other panelists. Documentation and culture is very core to who we are. Our values are our culture and we make sure we write all of that down and it right on that digging in and share a bit about what we've learned is an ultimate team and hopefully to be applicable to this afternoon.

Fantastic. Thank you. And my name is Laurel far. I am the CEO and founder of distribute Consulting, as well as the founder of the remote work Association distribute Consulting, is the world's only consulting firm that specializes exclusively in remote work. And so, we are honored to be here with these great experts and really excited to open the windows of remote work in operations and help. You understand what this looks like on a day-to-day basis. And for those of you that are remote already and have remote experience, you've definitely heard of these

companies before and hopes and dreams of working with them someday. So this will also give you the opportunity to peek in the windows of their culture and their operations to see if it's a good match for you as a future goal. So let's start there with that question. For all of you, what attracted you to each of your respective companies in the first place? Was it just the brand that you had heard of or was there something? Special ed teacher interest. Anybody want to go first? It's actually heard from get lab for the first time I've

lost my entire career. So I've been remote across the spectrum of color. In Highbridge for my entire career and I actually had to sit down, but wait a minute, you're all remote by choice. This is intentional, you don't have to pay for it or can I prove your worth and prove that you should be remote? I thought that was absolutely fascinating and get that and what's Wild is that just a year or two ago? That was still kind of the niche and now millions and millions and millions of people have a peek into

a remote. What I loved about Get Loud, was it? Everything was written down, transparency with obvious. Their entire handbook is public. Before you even start working here, you can see what FAQ. And there's a section that says, what's it like to work again? So you can find that out. I just thought that was so refreshing and accountability and it was obvious before I can you get life was incredible. Love it. Yeah, I think so, but Darren said, resume with my experience to. So I came into marketing through writing,

Excuse me, while I was looking for work, just the fact that I could write all day, the comfort of my home was mine going to be six or seven years ago. So I can have worked toward that dream in a lot of ways been very lucky to buy for to buy me. Some difficulty was this feeling of trust and respect the king with remote work, where I feel like I hold myself to a very high standard and so I'm going to get the work done, no matter where I am in to work at a place that recognizes and appreciates that it was kind of

an echo. These gentlemen, almost exactly. I I had been working in a coal located space before I joined automatic. But when I found out about automatic and found out about the values that automatic has been decreed in the mission to democratize publishing, you know, as a blogger, that really spoke to me. Even though it's a block that I think my dad is the only one who reads, but it matters. But I when I investigated more into the things that automatic does and the standards that they have, that was it really it mattered.

And then, like Kevin said coming on board, the amount of trust that's placed in every automatization is just staggering, especially when you come from a corporate role. In a, collage dated space, it can just be a very it's night and day and it I can absolutely say it's change. The entire course of my life. You said what automatic does? And so let's play zoom in to the Daily processes and operations of these companies. Because that's exactly how I got started. As a consultant in the first place is that I was the CEO of a

fully distributed company of about five hundred and I was hungry to know what other companies were doing, right? Like what are you doing? And what are you doing? And there's just pretty limited resources and organizational development of virtual organizations and I was just asking questions and finding where we were the same. Also finding how we were different and What Makes Us unique. So is any events that question back to you? What do you think automatic does differently in their operations and employee experience that maybe the other companies? Don't you

sure one of the big ones that we do. This is a little bit of a cheat because I think there are actually several companies Unusual for traditional companies to extreme, we don't use email at all and I know that space camp also doesn't use email at all and there's many others as well, but we don't use it at all. And in fact we rely on text communication, I won't say exclusively because we use zoom for one-on-ones and town halls and things of that nature. But for our day-to-day work, we

use synchronous conversation slack. And we also have a model, which is key 2 or it didn't happen. And P2 is a product that we've developed for It's it's blogging. It runs on WordPress and it's a product that we used to Archive, everything, so that everything is written down. Everything can be found again. And if it's important, it has to go on T2 and you can see every P2 in the company. So, if you want to dig into the financials, you go over to up and to the right or the money, if he too, and

you can take it in. And you can look at anything in the company, and I think that's one. I'm going to place, my automatic is unique where it's fully open. We want everybody to be able to see everything because of that. Trust again, that we give every Autumn Edition handbook, sad. Because I, I mean, I often described them that had books, they were nice and the 90s and 2000's, but they are the lifeblood of distributive companies there. And I know that get Labs handbook is transparent and iconic. I mean, as an operations manager, it's it's a thing of beauty.

How party? That's how we support them asynchronously, right? You can find answers, you can troubleshoot problems, no matter where you are, no matter who you can access. Its it really becomes this, this organic is living lifeblood of Information Management. So I'd love that. Speaking of get labs to Hamburg there. And what are you? What do you think that you do at get loud? That's different than other distributed companies. Yeah, we we have a few forcing functions because I'm forcing function to remind us to always work remote. First, we fire our slack messages after 90 days. So we

have slack but we pretty much use it. Only for a normal Communications we have topical channels like we have location channels like for Southern California near one, another 10 minutes groups and get together and go to co-working spaces or what-have-you. But we expire those messages so that we force work to begin and end in get my request. And if you start something in slack, it won't take long before someone will say, probably not a great idea to start work here. It's going to be gone,

and it only takes one or two of those reminders before. New hires, oh, I get it. All right, we're using slag for something different than basically any other company in the world. That's a big one and we also have a really high burden on meetings. We at one of our sub values is bias for asynchronous and we think that's a good way to communicate. That takes a broader array of time zones into account. And was in meetings, if you're not very extroverted. It's easy to kind of just shy away and not have your voice heard. But when everyone's in a shared Google

Docs, everyone is on equal playing field and you can contribute in that way. So for every meeting at get lab, you have to have a Google doc, agenda attached to it, if there's no agenda decline but it's not happening. Then on top of that, the meeting organizer has to make sure that documentation happens during the meeting and any takeaways or contextualized and then added to the handbook. So that the entire company can benefit from whatever happened in the synchronous meeting will make it really hard to have meetings. So that we try to figure out a better way to get to the outcome instead

of having a meeting. Have a difference but it would be tough to imagine. Going back specially in the world of Zoom fatigue. We try to avoid that right and it would say it was natural wasn't that they necessarily made a mistake. But when we're used to being together all the time and you know being synchronous in order to be productive and that's the natural about this, we got to be together on Zoom all day in order to be productive and we will very quickly saw as a world and as a society that oh, this is not necessary to

be together all the time. There's a beautiful balance between synchronous and asynchronous. Do you want, do you want to continue this conversation or do you want me to top a new question at 10? I don't know if it's something that I'm really proud that we've taken that step into, like, emotional well-being for our team. So we have one of our perks is on Mental health and wellness coaching and sessions and, and Modern Health, I believe it works every year. And one of the

biggest challenges people keep getting just a year, after year is isolation, is something that it comes up a lot of work. So I'm really proud of that. Something that we've identified in a buffer and where, to find a complete change out the great on that. So I'm yeah, I'm good for not working out too. Well, speaking of saying unified as a team and had building that culture of a, question that I know I get all the time, I'm sure that you guys get asked it regularly, how do we build culture? How do we build

trust? How do we unify as a team, if we're literally apart? So, tell talk to me about that, I know that Retreats you, all of you had famous Retreats that you've logged about so maybe RP Luxy Nail Spa, Retreats communication channels that you talked about a little bit. Darren how are you guys staying unified as a team in a building that interpersonal trust without bumping each other in each other? At the hallway, or at the break room, I'd like to say that. If you can't talk about puppies, you can't talk about profits. And so it's important that we have time to to just have casual

conversations. How do you guys do? I know as a a happiness expert. I feel like you have a good answer to. I hope I have a good answer. Yeah we we do a lot of communication so we keep that condition going all the time and I think Darren was talking about. This is why we have slot channels that are for water, cooler topics and make sure that people as their on-boarded are aware of them. We have peaches that are just specific to additions on your house or changing

the faucet out the first time. Yes like things on those need those lines and also everything you can think of puppies and kittens, all of that, baby's all that and we try to make sure that new Optimizations are aware of them so you know, where to go when they need to take a break from their daily work or just say hi to people and see people who are interesting. The same thing system. We also approached it Deliberately rather, than from like a. I hope this person finds out about

these things standpoint. We assign every new edition a mentor within the company, we ask them enter to reach out to them in their first three days. And then give them certified schedule of how often to touch base, what things to talk about, how to leave the men to come to the culture. And that person is always outside of their area of work, they get to meet somebody outside of their direct. Space so they can ask the stupid questions which don't exist of course, every questions valuable and we also have a long history of feedback can you take

within the culture where we asked people to give feedback clearly transparently and timely, but give him opportunities to do it anonymously as well. If they need to Fantastic. Kevin Darren, what do you guys think? You guys building that trust with each other and culture Idaho in the USA activities in Singapore and Sydney and Poland. In the UK, East Coast is not a time to all of us to be together without someone starting today, super early or stay up super late. So that same

connection is a challenge. Course, everything asynchronous, the connection we try to do that to channel is from Arby's archived conversations that people can access in time. So we check in there, we ask questions about, not only what we're doing to speak at work, but what's happening? Permission to include that aspect of yourself on the job. I think it makes a big difference. When things are a bit more novel in the world, would you try to get together once a year

at the phone company? And then I'll be up there, a lot of Us Weekly check-ins with together and then a lot of aspects of communication of being more open and more vulnerable is important in a virtual environment because that's all we have, you know, we don't have environmental context or cues or non-verbal communication to help people understand who we are. And we, you know, Put up the the poster Jon Bon Jovi or something. In our people going to be like this is who I am. And we have to tell people, we have to explain it. So yeah, I think everybody

needs to work on that more transparent consistent frequent communication style in order to make it work. I'm Darren any more thoughts on on Coulter development? Or do you want to move on to something else? Getting your culture equals value? We are in a space. Give me the color of the walls or the neighborhood that you're in or what restaurants are nearby. All of that kind of contributes to the energy or Vibe, but none of that is really truly culture. So, we need to find our culture by what our values are. We write our culture down, and you can very clearly see, it's

how we treat each other. It's how we treat. External parties, how those values or lived out when you see those values being left out, you think this is what culture feels like. This is what the longing feels like and we want to make sure that we hire people where they resonate with Best values in terms of making sure informal communication still happens. You have to be a lot of suddenly remote leaders are trying to figure this out because they never put any intentionality behind it. But it's actually the responsibility of a

recently. We had over a hundred and thirty people on a zoom call in about 20 or 30 people signing up to show off. Balance on Zoom, with a panel of judges and prizes and healthy competition, not rocket science here, but someone has to be responsible for creating an atmosphere for that to happen because you can't rely on spots. And no one is just going to cross paths in the hallway and relationships should have bought them from their am. I see in person matters, a lot in person is very important, we are

relational communal beings. And if you stay home for too long and don't have any human contact and dust are aware on you. Get the whole team together for a week, a year and then we have a series of user events and sales conferences. We try to bring people together as much as we possibly can and we value that the annual Retreat is something we all mark on our calendar as a business trip, that is 10 knots compared to a lot of cool located companies. You would do everything. It's funny how that ships depending on your perspective

that the grand meet up but we have every year is the one week a year that makes the other 51 weeks work. Absolutely yet. If you have them for, you know, 40 weeks of the year, then it loses its magic loses. Its novelty, and it becomes just another day. So, yeah, I find that because I'm for remote teams when you do get it into purse in person. Finally, it's just magic. It's absolute magic yet. If you worked in an office together, I can access them anytime just into makes the heart grow fonder.

And I really like the point that you made Darren about the value. So, you know, and it's so many people are very, very badly worried about remote worker isolation, you know? Are we all going to be a Hermit? However, it's important to remember that true culture and true. Unity comes from connection, not from front proximity. And so, it's very, very possible, and common to be feeling lonely and disconnected and lost. If you're sitting a few feet away from somebody. So, this is really what we're trying to focus on him, build and distributed companies. As how do I

make sure that people really feel equipped to do their job that you individually value to recognize and appreciate it. As part of this, this team Dynamic regardless of where they're located. So, speaking of that, this is a really big concern for a lot of people is on boarding in training. It came up Our conversation that came up in in the chat box and we have it in our in our loaded questions as well of why does this look like you do a from day one? How do we make sure that people understand what our culture is and that they feel connected and you know they

don't have that opportunity to just walk around the office and get to know people and and learn through osmosis. So what does that process look like at all of your company's Kevin? I don't think I've targeted you for. So let's let's start with you at work through the access to information, that's something. We try to do it before, make everything. Such as far as parents, are there, when you do on board, you have everything there to learn that you want someone.

We definitely don't want that fire hose feeling also have this time. I still got you that you're available. We are to learn. Hiring process for us. So I'm boarding. Almost starts at the point of hiring a job, descriptions need to know where you at work. How are job listing has all the information for the interview stage? The part of our interview stages asynchronous that we can see how you all work. That way videos videos. Now you can you can ideas and information that way and so we get a really good sense for what

it what you will be like a Sparta bus route. Hopefully what bus will be like if you are to join our team Evo documentation wants to join but we have a pretty good sense that you're on the right path question as a consultant like well what happens if two job shadowing like I can't do job shadowing anymore you know being Do job shadowing like it's just happening in different channels. Like, Over My Dead Body. Am I going to have a new hire? Like, well, you're on your

way and it's just like come into my meeting and watch my notes, in my Google doc, as opposed to look at my notebook and come into the conference room. So Daddy, I'm sure that this is a massive part of your job description. So what are, what are your best tips and strategies for I'm putting in training so something we do is leave during the hiring process to, we do a trial. So everybody who comes to work for automatic spends, a couple of weeks doing the job and figuring out if they're a good fit for this work and if they liked being in this

kind of environment and working on the things that they're going to be working on and it gives us a Also, to give them tips for how to improve or thinks that they can tweak or make sure that the thing that they're trying to do is the thing that they really want to do. And so, with our happiness engineer support, we do a four-week trial and we can support them every step of the way. And sometimes we get towards the end and people realize, it's not what they want to do and other times they realize that they love it more than they

realized and that's but the situations are okay, with us, we want people to be moving into the the role for all the right reasons. The other thing that we do is when we start people at automatic there, first 2 weeks are in support so they join the happiness regardless of what their role is for two weeks and talk directly with customers. And it gives them a chance to understand the product really well, but it also puts them In the deep end with more than 300 of our friendliest people and constant high-touch communication and give them a

chance to really understand. The company works as it's just a lot of communication all day long during the hours that they're going to be working anywhere in the world, because we have happiness, engineer's all around the globe, talking customers all day, 24 hours. So, just give them a chance to dive into the company culture with both feet and but also have a little floaties on. So they're not getting lost a 1 stick. A lot of friends, helping them. I love that. And I think if I could take away that we should all be riding down as as

we're listening to, this conversation is be prepared for working interview. That's not super common in inculcated companies on, but it is very, very common in distributive teams because of exactly everything we were talking about. We need to be prepared to look for an experience that culture Mac match. Are we can do Civ working in similar Styles and are we communicating effectively in a virtual environment and we have to see each other and after I'll just employer to employee but also employ you to employer cuz there's different styles of virtual teams and the

Dynamics and organizational behavior should be the company's is very unique as well. It's not one-size-fits-all. So you as as job Seeker is need to be empowered, to identify the company. That's a good match for you as well. Darren, I want to resume specifically into the the skills training part of onboarding. What skills are you guys really pushing? And promoting, as your onboarding new hires, I get lots of a high-level. We try to hire managers of what this is, actually, one of our sub values. In the reason we use that terminology is it's really

brought. We want to make sure that people can manage their personal life manage their boundaries between working life manage. The inflow of work. I'll be a self-seeker to first, try to find the information themselves within the Love hand book instead of reverting to syncroness Norms where they may have come from that encapsulates a lot. And so there's a lot of digging and goes into that. You can really figure this out by asking a person tell me about a time where you didn't have very much information and you can kind of on your own. What does that look like for if you were moving a piece of a

project forward? What did that look like? Or tell me about a time, where your cohorts were on campus, or a different place, you were in a different part of the world and you contributed and you move the project forward. We ask for people to tell stories, it's it's less about specific anecdotes, and more about tell me a story, tell me your experience that helps us. Get a peek into the mind of how someone Works in a similar role to get lab. We also make it very clear, what it's going to be like to work at get lab all of our strategy and our vision. Our product roadmap, like I

said, there's even a section of the FAQ called what's it like to work at 5. So people know what they're getting into and Like to say no one accidentally ends up at get lab, you very much option to this culture. I think the one thing that would may be surprised a lot of people as we look for great storytellers, remote companies that communication is really important and it is, but it's much deeper than that. We want people that think, three steps prior and three steps forward, because you're probably going to be writing a lot, and you need to be able to contextualize and

deliver, very precise, detailed missives on whatever your project is. So that if someone comes in, Midstream legitimately a year or two, after an idea is incepted, you have written it down in such a way that they can join that conversation, Midstream, and contribute meaningfully, that's a rare skill, especially for people that have been used to just verbalizing things over and over. In a loop of synchronous meetings in a cola, get its face, that's a strange function. And so we want to make sure that people are comfortable doing that and they prefer to do that. And again, they know what they're

getting into. Absolutely, we're covering all three. So this is a beautiful thing. It says, let's run in that direction of communication because I know that when I am hiring and working with new hires, this is something we talked about all the time is the communication style of remote workers is just different. It requires, it just requires a different style that I personally defined. As more consistent, more frequent and more consistent, more frequent and more empathetic. So I'd love to hear from Kevin and Sandy especially on the topic of communication. What are you looking for? Is your

training or is your screening I'm in those in in that style of communication? What do you need workers to be as they are. Going in producing work. Yeah, I can do it. The one that stands out from your list, especially Laurel is the embassy. We recognize that a lot of written communication can be telling. You can be misinterpreted and sell it. It's really important that you spend that time to make sure you're communicating clearly, and that you're understanding how it might be interpreted by

the other person that acted empathy is really special to the way to reach me to get an offer. I can practice is it might be removing lingo from the things that you write, so maybe if you are acronyms understand what those are, especially with remote work. The back-and-forth of written, communication can take time, especially if you're the person you're communicating with is halfway around the world. So clearly is a really powerful way that we stay at the shed. Then we get work done, and taking an extra time to do that. Pays dividends because it keeps things moving and not

too much stuff and it's so relatable to write. Like, we all had that experience even prior to remote work of like writing that text that we thought was totally innocent and somebody completely misinterpreted, and I'm not, right? And that's exactly what we are at risk for with a synchronous. Communication every single day in distributed seems like we have to think very, very, very carefully. And like, there is a very proactive lie about how are messages could be interpreted, how they could be impacting this other person and we just need to be

more emotionally intelligent and and socially aware I think. Daddy is not part of the, the happiness, definition, it at a automatic. Is this higher level of emotional intelligence or a post or a slack message? But also me freely, give feedback feedback in automatic is integral and a lot of feedback we get is around communication and around how you can communicate for the right impact and not focus on the intent of communication. So I'm asking somebody what do you want to accomplish with this post, right? And then helping them.

See how they can get the most impact in the clearest way with the least disruption. And that could be like having said, cutting out some of those acronyms. You know, speaking the clearest and most basic level to get your point across and not using slang or knowing your audience, where you're putting your, your comment or post or whatever it might be. But absolutely. Empathy is top of the top of the stack, love it. Alright. Well, I'm going to take a quick break to tell everybody in the audience. Want to hear your questions were not just here to give you

our questions and answers but we want to make sure that you were getting the information out of this that you want. So if you have questions, go ahead, pop them in the chat. Make sure that you're in this stage. And then, you can talk to your questions and there they will be facilitated to us through our wonderful back and moderators. And so, will give will do one more question. That's, that's from the can Just to continue the conversation, give you guys some time to to fill up the queue. And then the stage is yours and, and will be answering as rapid fire is possible

your question. So, make sure to fill up. Chat. So if you are wonderful panelist, let's try to summarize everything that we we talked about. We've been talking about job-seeking. We've been talking about culture and communication Team Dynamics. So just as as an all-encompassing answer to that, talk to me about screening, if we have people in our audience that are hungry to work for your brand or hungry to work for a specific brand, that is remote friendly. How can they raise their hand and tell the employer that they are good fit. What is that screening in a

matching process? Look like Especially in in a in a work force and in a job market that is so so competitive everybody wants a remote work, a remote job right now, everybody. And so how can they stand out if nothing else? I started forgetting, it's more about values alignment. If if you just come in to a job interview and you're just opened about look, I just I hate my commute, I just want to work remotely, I don't really care what I do, truly aligned with the values in

general, get lab or elsewhere. That's what you should be looking at, look first for a job or role that you're going to love in a culture and a set of values that will resonate with you. Because if you join a remote company and you aren't aligned with the values, you won't have a commute, but it can still be miserable. So don't think that remote is going to solve everything. Remote is just a component of its values alignment and making sure you're working with people, you enjoy and doing work that you enjoy. It's really important. Interview process moments in life where you have work.

Autonomously, are you working remote setting? Our you've been disconnected from the rest of your team that kind of experience as really great. That's a really good point because I know that people have been asking, if I don't have remote work experience, can I qualify to be a remote worker? Honestly, all of us do have. Yeah and some people like we all have some level of remote work experience and maybe you know volunteering with an organization that doesn't have an office or we did online education when we were in college or something like drawn that experience and ultimately

just bought. These companies want to see is that your good self manager, just proved that you can work autonomously and it's less about location. Your you might be focused on the location, but the more that you're not focused on location, your focus on qualification in the job. So you can process that will take me to the farthest. Vending Kevin, what do you guys think? So with automatic, we look for people who can communicate very well. That's something that we just don't. We don't ever lower the bar for, we want you

to be a really excellent communicator. And it ties in with what Darren was talking about with. Like we have to tell your story and explain to us why you feel like this is a good match. It's absolutely about the culture alignment as well. You don't have to be somebody who is yuno adopts all the latest technology the moment it comes out. That's certainly fine but you can also be somebody who Stick with the tried-and-true methods that you're used to and is just well aligned with the culture that

we already have. We look for people who obviously meet the qualifications, But we also look for potential in people, you know, what kind of impact can they have? We want somebody who can be a force multiplier and have high impact and be efficient and effective. So examples of projects that you can do and have done, autonomously are important but the other half of that the other half the Seesaw between autonomous is because of work really within the group as well

and you have to communicate that work. So if somebody wants to come into the company and then disappear 8 hours a day and just sort of show up for the weekly stand up or whatever, that's not really a good set. We need people who can be really tightly tied in to the communication and be clear about what they're working on and where, what stumbling blocks they're coming up against and how they think they're going to solve them and getting feedback from the group all the time. Wonderful. Kevin I know that you guys get such a high application rate at buffer who stands out to you guys,

to think I might add, I tend to look for responsibility and responsible. When it comes to screen a responsibility, we can spring for that when it comes to the actual size of a filling out completely understand the instructions. Are they responsible for a long time? And I expect people to drop everything to talk to us during interview process such as of store, do another job but just stopped way of communicating. Tell us what to expect expectations that we are

wondering you know where the first when she was happening. I think that is a sign for us that this person will never go to buy am at work. Responsibility to your teammates. Think are that group? Amazing wonderful. Alright well I think it's time to get to Tucson open Q&A. Thank you all for your incredible answers and let's just keep the momentum going. We do have a lot of questions with this great. So I'm going to try to Rapid Fire, this, I'll Target the questions to one person, but that doesn't mean that it is exclusive to one person. So

if you have additional thoughts, just deduct and interrupts and just let's just keep it going. But we'll, we'll try to limit to when answer, so we can get through as many questions as possible. So, that sound good to you guys. So, you're in the hot seat, you never know what's going to happen. This is where the stress starts. It's so exciting career trajectory, this is a very, very good one because there is evidence to justify evidence to show that career stagnancy is is biased in hybrid team. So people that

are on site have faster Career Development than people that are off-site and So it's very much an out-of-sight out-of-mind problem, and so he's asking about this. How do you ensure that in a hybrid team that there is equality and, and that there's not a discrimination between on-site and off-site? Worker is. Now, I know this is tricky question, because you guys are from fully distributed teams on Sunday. I think you're closer than anybody to, to even a close to hybrid model. So I'm going to point the question to you. Sure. We, we really don't have any

co-located spaces. Well, I guess that's not true because our Tumblr folks have been co-located, but we do like the ankle that I can answer. This is, if people are more quiet and aren't actively pursuing career growth, do they get the chance to pursue that career growth as aggressively as anybody else? Like, do we only give her this week, its wheel. And we try not to one of the roles that I'm selling myself, is making sure that our happiness engineer's can grow and build and develop their careers in ways that are satisfying for them and

give a lot of high-impact back into happiness and finding ways to make sure that that is available to every happiness engineer. Whether they're speaking up for it or volunteer, I think probably we all have the same example. Swear if you put up a post for a call for volunteers to test something, for example, you kind of get the same couple of people who always loved it. They want to be part of it everything but what about the people who think? Well, I know so and so can apply and maybe I don't have time or I don't feel like I'm qualified enough. Making sure that team leads are

talking to everybody on the team about opportunities that fit their interest. In their growth trajectory that they are looking for it. So one happiness engineer may be very interested. In troubleshooting, another happiness, engineer, maybe looking more for project management growth and then try to find things that can fit both those types of people. Perfect. I love it. And as a consultant, I'll also add that a remote work policy can really help with this. It's a legal protection of expectations, and, and qualifications and enforcement of our flight standards. So that

could be a mess of help. But more importantly, if you are working in a hybrid team, what the problem is coming from is that you are trying to manage virtual employees with a physical work space and a physical management method. So the more that you can move into a location irrelevant or location-independent method that tree and manages, everybody equally. Will help soothe those pains. Okay. Next when the Plexi Darren I think this is a good one for you. It wants to know about continuing education. I know that some companies offer workshops

for their employees to grow various skills is most common in the tech world. What does continuing education look like in a remote? Yep, so we'll support tuition reimbursement. If people want to go get educated on anything that would make them really building out our Learning and Development program, we just set up a leadership toolkit. We have a managerial training session Thank you so much. Kevin, you ready? This one's for you. And I know that you guys have great practices at buffer, so I'm really glad that this one by default went to you. But this is asking about measuring

performance. Not just measuring productivity, which we know can often be measured with more accurately with results but measuring team performance in general. What does that look like a buffer? I guess we have a couple different tools that we use that. I miss the company of all the Pokemon that we're using. Okay, ours and one performance indicator of know how we setting and achieving goals we use we use. Okay. Ours as a tool for learning, not for judging. So our goal is to see what happened and improve the next time around is not we don't I receive use the competition to

the outcomes to those who cares. Historical context, and how the teams have been improving in terms of Happiness, satisfaction with Jakob holistic view of like how we're doing for the business, how we're doing for our people? And this one is from Ben, who is asking, what does a typical work week look like at your company? So how much time is spent planning and strategizing and in meetings versus independent independent heads down work, Yeah. So how are you doing? Is your contributors probably spend 2 to 3 hours a week in

meetings? And the rest is heads down, Focus work time. We're currently experimenting with the four-day work week. So for the next six months to try to find a Samsung Focus work, the managers have a bunch more question for schedule. My schedule prices probably 80% meetings, 20% definitely split between individual contributor working but see, during a believe that you were the one that said that sell Target discussion to you make is asking what does quote bring your whole self to work

mean at each of your organization's. Yeah, I think Kevin mention that but it's very true at get lab well for us. It's really simple. I think we are one of the most geographically and culturally diverse teams in the world and for companies that are trying to figure out a way to make their company more diverse hiring, remote, is the obvious way to do that in any given day. I could see Clemson's glimpses of Copenhagen and New Zealand in North Dakota and it's because people are there. So they're able to bring them up their whole selves to work because we don't force them

to move somewhere that isn't fully aligned with where they want to be. So for us, it's as simple as hire. The best people, let them stay where they are and you by default get all of them at work. And it is such a psychological shift as well because when we're at home, we are used to being are inhibited selves, right? We are ourselves in our safe place at home, and then all of the sudden we have Work come into our safe place and and typically we have a buffer zone of literally a buffer zone, right? We get in the car, we drive we get to get

into that, mindset shift of this, is my work self and then this is my personal cell and now got that work environment. All those dynamics of your team, all come into your, personal space. And so, for a lot of people, it can be very, very vulnerable. I'm also really create a problem with work by Foundry, so Kevin because I didn't give proper credit where credit was due. I'll bounce, which is about that. So how do you ensure that your employees? Is it from Salina? By the way, how do you ensure that your employees have healthy boundaries between work life and personal life and

especially to prevent burnout? It's a great question. I like Darren's praising of like a manager of one. I think a lot of it comes down to that personal responsibility to set boundaries for yourself and some of that you can scream through the heart. Live in the environment where there is a lot of personal accountability and responsibility for creating those batteries. You have a couple of things stylus were very conscious and mental well-being, how much are always encouraging folks to

understand examples of managers, to log out of stock and messages, 8 p.m. like, it's a very tricky balance that you're on schedule. So, I don't want to dictate when someone can't be online, but I do want to be, I want to create a space that conversation to happen. If it feels like they're working hard, they want to be You should be happy about what specific hours. They are the list of soft skills. That is so critical to our emotional intelligence. All I discipline it is absolutely essential. So thank you for that

Zandy you're up next. You ready? And this one is from Eddie he's talking about how do you Foster growth and mentorship in a remote setting in it? I'll even take that a step further and say just growth and innovation in general as a team. We do it through culture. Mostly we say anybody can have a great idea and when you have that great idea and make sure that you bring it up, you know anybody can ping RCL Matt and say hey got this idea about the things that they find important. Not everything we will pursue but

through the culture of great ideas come from anyone, we encourage people to keep growing, you know use that brain. We we want your brain and we want you and those things are the ways that people can have a big impact. So it's the culture but we put into place also thinks that people can do. So we also use culture for Gathering feedback and and we do a couple of times a year and Anonymous survey and try to pull out some of those ideas that people are having that maybe they don't feel

They can bring up or the we have internal feedback forms to. The people can fill out to give feedback to people in a safer way. And then we coach our team leads on how to communicate and help people learn to manage up and continue to Advocate the things that are important to them. Wonderful. I hope this one is a. Another question that is open to any of you. So whoever wants to pop in first Kevin was fast on the draw last time so we'll see who wins this time is the workload increased for positions of research states.

That remote workers work faster. They're more productive 40%, more productive than they're in office counterparts. So does that mean that they just get their work done in a short amount of time or are their scopes of work? Increased based on hybrid remote company? Like you said, it there being compared against in office, counterpart, super hybrid company. It's a whole different Beast because you're fundamentally managing an on-site employee experience and off-site employees. Andrew Motors. Guilt, in a hybrid setting is very real. Most people in a

remote setting will feel some sort of guilt of I don't have 2 or 3 hours of commute. So does that mean I should work two or three more hours in a day? And this is I think going to be Massive Reckoning for a lot of companies that have quasi go back to the office and then refused to promote normal setting, we have one Playing Field, Works itself out a lot more Sedona hybrid setting, be careful for that. It's really easy to overwork. When you consider the commute time apart of work time, instead of your time, Fantastic will thank you all so much about this. That's answer the last

question myself. That is in both places. I'm seeing a lot of questions about neurodiversity. I want to make sure that that one gets a voice because I'm remote work is such a great tool for enhancing diversity and inclusion of all different Scopes, right? Not just the traditional discriminatory factors like age and race and sexual orientation and gender, but also diversity in terms of urban-rural divide and neurodiversity. So this can be a really, really great offer option. If you are somebody that has a disability or a

minority of some kind of remote can be a really great option for you, two to leverage and to grow in your career because we measure results, instead of physical supervision, there is less opportunity in room for discrimination and we also like you heard. We Leverage asynchronous Navigation a lot. And that gives people the ability to process and produce work at the speed that is comfortable for them. So, if you have a mental health concern, or if you have like ADHD and cognitive processing disorder, were brought up. So you just

need more time to process remote. Gives you that flexibility. So that is a really, really great topic that I wanted to make sure we squeezed in before Debbie kicks us off. But thank you so much to Sandy and Kevin and Aaron for all of your incredible insights. And letting us look into the windows of your virtual organizations, really appreciate your time. And of course, thank you to our church for hosting us today. Thank you. For not writing. Well Thanks everyone.

Cackle comments for the website

Buy this talk

Access to the talk “Working at the Top All-Remote Companies: Automattic, Buffer & GitLab | Arc.dev Remote Career Summit”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Ticket

Get access to all videos “Remote Career Summit 2020”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Ticket

Interested in topic “Human Resources Management”?

You might be interested in videos from this event

June 4, 2020
Online, London
7
421
diversity, employing , in-house, inclusion, inclusion strategy, online business conferences, online conferences, online events, recruiting

Similar talks

Caro Griffin
Director of Operations at Skillcrush
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Andrew Gobran
People Operations Generalist at Doist
+ 2 speakers
Laïla von Alvensleben
Head of Culture & Collaboration at MURAL
+ 2 speakers
Sacha Connor
Founder and CEO at Virtual Work Insider
+ 2 speakers
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
David Hansson
Founder & CTO at Basecamp
+ 1 speaker
Tammy Bjelland
Founder & CEO at Workplaceless
+ 1 speaker
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Buy this video

Video
Access to the talk “Working at the Top All-Remote Companies: Automattic, Buffer & GitLab | Arc.dev Remote Career Summit”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Conference Cast

With ConferenceCast.tv, you get access to our library of the world's best conference talks.

Conference Cast
944 conferences
37487 speakers
14316 hours of content