Events Add an event Speakers Talks Collections
 
Duration 58:29
16+
Video

Nail Your Next Developer Interview: Shopify, Zapier and Help Scout | Arc.dev Remote Career Summit

Lawrence Mandel
Director of Engineering, Money at Shopify
+ 3 speakers
  • Video
  • Table of contents
  • Video
Remote Career Summit 2020
June 26, 2020, Online, USA
Remote Career Summit 2020
Request Q&A
Remote Career Summit 2020
From the conference
Remote Career Summit 2020
Request Q&A
Video
Nail Your Next Developer Interview: Shopify, Zapier and Help Scout | Arc.dev Remote Career Summit
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Add to favorites
2.4 K
I like 0
I dislike 0
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
  • Description
  • Transcript
  • Discussion

About the talk

Engineering leaders from top remote companies discussed their hiring processes, including how they conduct technical interviews, and tips to help applicants prepare. They also shared what an impressive resume looks like and what skills they look for in a candidate.

[Resources]

📝 Notes from this talk: https://bit.ly/Sz5USRw

🌐 Remote Career Summit: https://bit.ly/RCS2020-event

[Speakers]

- Lawrence Mandel: Director of Production Engineering at Shopify

- Lisa Smith: Engineering Manager at Zapier

- Anjuan Simmons: Engineering Coach at Help Scout

- Hosted by Ivy Lee: AI Consultant at Studio Xolo

[Learn More]

- Arc: https://m.arc.dev/yto

- Shopify: https://www.shopify.com/

- Zapier: https://zapier.com/

- Help Scout: https://www.helpscout.com/

Arc connects exceptional remote developers with great organizations. Arc developers have worked with companies like Spotify, Fivestars, Chegg, Hims, and more. Level up your remote career with Arc.

00:00 Intro

00:47 What attracted companies

04:09 The main responsibilities

10:00 The team process

15:48 Recommendations for candidates before interview

24:54 The favorite interview question

32:35 Practice Interviewing

37:45 Problem of solving. Skills

39:23 Communication Skill

45:46 The Evolution of Your Career

48:30 About looking for

57:13 Working at Help Scout

About speakers

Lawrence Mandel
Director of Engineering, Money at Shopify
Lisa Shissler Smith
Engineering Manager at Netflix
Anjuan Simmons
Engineering Coach at Help Scout
Ivy Lee
Founder at Studio Xolo

I enjoy technical challenges and have taken on some big ones in my career including shipping software to millions of people and some of the largest companies in the world, building new products, and founding open source projects. But perhaps the most rewarding challenge has been building teams that are engaged, focused, and effective. I'm proud to say I have a strong track record for engaging, developing, and mentoring people. I am also an active athlete, a coach for youth sports, into charitable fundraising, and actively involved in the University of Toronto community. Specialties: leadership, strategy, planning, people/team management, coaching/mentorship, employee engagement, productivity, consumer software, distributed teams, build and release, open source

View the profile

Anjuan Simmons is a technologist with a successful track record of delivering technology solutions from the user interface to the database. He is an energetic and informative speaker who presents at conferences, seminars, schools, and community centers around the world on topics including Agile software development, diversity, and leadership. Anjuan has an undergraduate degree in electrical engineering from the University of Texas at Austin and an MBA from Texas A&M University.

View the profile

I'm a YC founder, ex-CTO & Chief Data Scientist, hackathon winner, full stack AI specialist.

View the profile
Share

Hello everyone. Super excited for this next panel. I know a lot of people in the audience are developers, so this panel before you. And today, we have a free repelis and Ivy is going to be our host to ask questions. So, I ducked and Engineering engineering manager at staff year, and on one is a Android coach Thanks, Debbie. That start with some warm-up questions for each of you, what attracted to your respective companies. I'm sure, I guess I am really

excited to be with all of you today. I'm hoping that we can really give you some chips and getting a job that you've always dreamed of What attracted me that help Scout actually was the job description helped out really well. Crafted very intentional job descriptions or JD's that describe the role that describe who you'll be working with. And I really like the fact that a lot of the response to the JD were essay questions ride and now that I'm on the other side and I asked him about the hiring, we take those responses, very, very seriously. And so the JD and help Scout

really helped me, see that the company is very thoughtful and very intentional and that has really in Ford my entire experience here. Okay, so I'll jump in now. So I really like this question as I started. It's one of those things where when you're looking for a new job you should really like ideally be really excited about the place where you're going. And so for me, Shopify was it really feels a couple of key needs that I that I hadn't any new employer in that was I wanted to go a place where I could really learn in a place where I can bro, and I really believe that I got

the opportunity to do that or shall I think shopify's one of these places, where are you going to lunch? Lawrence. The startup deal with a little Shopify. I was saying Shopify. Get some a lot like a startup in many ways especially with the attitude that we take on the work, they were doing that. You got a lot of start of benefits with it. The start of risk do for me as like a provider for my family as well. That was really important as well. That I got the gets those again growth and learning in this startup environment but again it's bigger companies now.

Perspectives to Lisa. How about you? So I kind of a combination of both of those. What? My previous Canyons here. Have said, zapier has always been a hundred percent remote. So everything we do is very intentional meditation, ality shows. Also we have a very clear set of company values that are reflected in everything we do. And I don't think I realized how important that was until I join zafira is very nice. I knew them before I started and they permeate everything we do and that still consistent. Now so that combined with the

same certification process that on one described where it's at the questions, rather than just a, a parsed resume in order to find out a little bit more about what who you are. And then the interview process itself was also a thing for me, I spend as much time getting to know zapier as they got to know me. And that was, I felt very Equitable and I think we both learned from that experience, that we were going to be a Batch. Great. How big is the team each of your managed and what are your main responsibilities? Fergus will continue this order at

hopes that we have a player-coach model. So, as an interim coach, I manage a team of five people that includes to JavaScript developers, to take your boyfriend, didn't work to PHP developers, who do a lot of our middleworld work, and some back and work. And once you a person, I ask the coach I'm responsible for helping my players feel supported and I do have a very clear view of what the career that help Scout. I should look like and that beyond the work that we're obviously responsible for doing in shipping features. The customers appreciate that. We hope that our customers love. I

always want to make sure that we have a clear sense of what are the goals of my players. And in what way can I introduce me? The needs of the business with the personal goals of my players. I'm also responsible for managing projects and some involved in planning, execution. And muttering, I am enclosing those projects out Learn so I my current team is 78 people. I run a team known as developer acceleration so our mission at the company is to make Commerce developers highly productive. And I think about says, the team at

your stale engineering, engineering, a Shopify started as a smaller team. Now, over a thousand people and the challenges that you face when you scale to a thousand people are certain big challenges. Even things that seem like small one. So be the obvious one or the first one that I usually bring up is when I'm on boarding in a company. If there's a handful of developers of the company that takes me, you know, a couple of days or weeks on board, that's okay, that's a week loss, but when I'm on board and 20 developer is every two weeks you have to multiply that if any man of lost time and so

that's something, where is worth the investment. My team handles all of the tooling and practices processes, libraries and languages at work that we do a Shopify. We do shared contacts as well. So concretely, this is thing is like our open is Contra open source contributions. Ruby on Rails the way that we do our local development ruling, our continuous integration and continuous deployment as well as interacting with production infrastructure but also how we share contacts through our developer handbook and things like that talks are our annual Deb Summitt. I'm so, my responsibility is as

any manager. It's at for a strategy execution and team composition. So hiring building making sure things are working well but it's also the strategy of the engineering level. And so I think this is one of those differences. Once you get to the director level, certainly at Shopify, you're looking sort of open-ended as well. And so what's the health of Shopify? Engineering? What are the cross product line issues that we face? And how do we build engineering as a discipline within the company and work with the other disciplines of factly? So it's really a broad-reaching role that has like a

narrow scope of responsibility. Cool Lisa. How about your team and dad. So I I managed six engineer's. My team has the widest Global reach of any of that. I have two engineers in Taiwan. What an Australia won. Portugal won Birmingham UK to in California and, and then I work with a product manager at a designer. As an e p, d Trio, and all engineering teams as a peer run, that way. So that we have imposed across discipline and put my team is developer platform and we're in charge of the mechanism that

both our internal teams and any external developer that wants to build an app on Zapped, your uses, they have a command line interface, and a graphic interface, you can come and build whatever happened like using our tools. We are now engaged in a project to extract each individual service out of the monolith, as many folks are engaged in doing now. And so, my team is the first we're leaving the way. And We are setting up The Primitives that most other teams are going to use in. Their Journey said the developer platform came out first and we're halfway or so on that

project. And I have three back Engineers, three friend and engineers. And they're just, they're wonderful humans. I'm responsible for their success and continued happiness. As they work, as a happier, my job is part coach, and part mentor and part, you know, person who helps you get your personal stuff done. So I try to take care of them. My goal is for them to be their best beer and so I go to meetings so they don't have to and I represent developer platform throughout the company and I work with other engineering managers that we set up a bunch of peer groups and managers

that we work together and solve problems and also help each other out. Pure management is Crucial for me, I'm relatively new manager, I'm not brand new, but it helps having other managers perspectives on things when you're a hundred percent remote company. It can be, kind of isolating is an individual contributor to even more isolated as a manager. So having that support has been crucial for me. And I first heard that out, I started the manager circles at the company because, selfishly, I, I wanted to talk to the manager Cool

Lisa. If you don't mind, I'll continue with nice question. Which is can you describe your team's engineering interview process? And you feel, there's a big difference when the candidate is remote. So, I'm going to say a hundred percent, no, because we hire and an interview very successful and have from the very beginning, 100% remote, our interview process has. So the initial phase is obviously that essay questions and the answers to those questions are reviewed. If you're selected to participate in the process

further, there is a take-home code assignment that you can work on at your own pace and use any resources, you wish. And after that is evaluated, then there are a few in personal views, depending on the level or the job that you're after that, you might meet with the team that you're on or a Across engineering department, team made up of Engineers from various other teams and it's a question. Once you've done the technical exercise, there's not going to be any like live coding

aspects to the interview. You will have already achieved that and then approved for that part of it. So you don't have to wipe board or answer any you know Cody problems in your head while we're working together and there's no pair programming, part of it is as well, so they'll be some technical fault questions. How would you work through this problem? But no, like, can you write code on a whiteboard for us situation. And and then there's you meet with the people from engineering, but also people from outside the department so that you can get to know different parts as a pure while you're

going to the interview process. Cool. I'm the one you want to follow up. Absolutely. So very similar what? Lisa just described after our people operations are our Pops, a team goes through the resumes and the size the kindest, add meat. We're looking for a, we have what we call a value-add interview. And so, as a coach, I'm usually doing this part of the process, and that is not cultural fit, right? Cuz we find that coaches off than socially culturally constructed and unhelpful ways, but we have what we call a value-add meeting. What does

this person have beyond the base? Skillset but what perspective is what specials do they have? That will really add to help out? And so I was roughly 45 minutes then we have a standard text screen which is also about 45 minutes where a member of our team talks to the expense of their technical Acumen and then make sure that from that perspective that we're all clear of a brief call to go. Okay, it says, candidate feeling good about the process was their timeline and then we move on to the project and so against a bunch of what Lisa

describe, what do you have? A tick Home Project? This person works on out, we do compensate, people who get this far for their time because we know that doing this, work is labor and that not everyone has to privilege to do this freely until we try to cover some of that cost about paying them for what they do with the project. By the time, I were very based on what the project is, but once they turn in that project, our internal team will go over the project. Look at it, I get a sense of what this candidate will report, other candidates, who were hired and look at their

projects. And then after that, if all goes, well, we get to the final interview, where members of the hiring team. Talk to the candidates this time. Hopefully, they're feeling good about us. We're feeling good with regards to them. I would try to get to a hiring decision. Once we decide that this person is a good fit, we checked your references. We typically won't free people to provide a reference. I delete to would be previous Managers from this candidate. We have a final huddle and then the hiring manager makes the final call. I prefer weeks, then the

offer and hopefully celebrate someone joining. Cub Scout do not do peer programming as part of our process. That is something that I've just been kicking around in my head about something that might be really helpful. So that's how we hire at hotel. Lawrence highlight Shopify. Yeah, it's Shopify. We have a structured process much like what you just heard so we will generally you'll start with a conversation with the hiring manager. Someone in a position like mine. I ordered a recruiter and this is really a conversation where we can share a bit of Shopify with you and you can

share a bit with us and is really trying to figure out whether there's a match. And whether we think that there's a reason to go forward in the process because this is going to be a good and I got nuts on both sides that you were evaluating us and is evaluating you at the beginning. After that we have a couple of interviews and we typically conducts a weave, a coding challenge that you can complete on your own time. I believe we have another one called the life story of story is really, to get a sense of who you are as a person. What are the decisions that you made what drives you? So it's

a little different than the rest of the interviews that we go through the process. After that we get into some more structured interviews are really focused on you and your technical background. So we have a technical deep dive or we want to take a project or sometimes two projects that you worked on and really dies deep on the implements. Ocean details. Understand what you did. Why did you make those decisions? What was the outcome? What did you learn from doing this, right? So little self-reflection on that. And then we have to one, which is a pair programming. Where you working with

someone else you think about it. If you've done pair programming, you're the one at the keyboard driving and you got the interview interview or along with you as another brain that can work with you on the problem. And then similarly, we got a problem solving interview, where the two of you work together to solve a problem and we have a problem set for you and we have a number of those different types of problems we work through after that. It's pretty standard like you hurt as well. So going to reference Jackson at working with recruiting on it, but that's the general process that you

can expect to go through with most of our interviews. Are we don't have a take-home project actually that's one where I did hear that, so that's where I know some companies do we don't have to take home project. For technical interviews. Are there any resources to leave you or tools to be familiar with or things you would recommend candidates do before their interview? But I thought I'd help Scout right? Being familiar with our stack, right? So we have reacted front ends. We use a job in the back in and Pees P,

basically in the middle. So obviously knowing that those Screen Works in that stack is hopeful and I would say go to the web page and read where we talked about who we are and our team, and how were constructed and you'll find. I think that we have a very diverse team with diverse perspectives and I think that that would be great to look at. And then just buy him Scout. We both offer for people who care about their customers. And so, that helps gout patients, are you really about why are suffering exists? Then we'll be by the company was built. And I will say that, you know,

coming with more than just a technical knowledge but that you understand our mission, you understand, are our values that is incredibly helpful to understand before you come in to interview with us. Yeah, if I can, if I can rip on that, I think the biggest piece of advice, I would give is what you you were just saying. At the end. There are on one. It's really coming in prepared for yourself. I think a lot of people misunderstanding and interview process is a company, interviewing you to make sure that you can be hired by the company is actually, it's a two-way process and you're

interviewing the company at the same time. And so, the more crappy you do in advance and just like we try to do some prep understand you know, a bit about your background, you'll send us a resume or cover letter other information, right? You might send it to get her profile or a LinkedIn or something else. The same thing, you know what, what can you tell about the company? What is it that you want to know and having. Bit more information on your side allows you to ask questions at a little more in-depth and allows you to till till your answer is in it honestly put on a better a better

way for the interviewer as well as you can. You really have a more of a sense of the direction in which the interview or wants to see you go to be in line with the company. So I'll I'll pay you back on that to knowing yourself is important knowing things that you like working on so you can answer enthusiastically. If you're going to give me a link to your Repose I want to know what's in there. I'm not going to go poke through it. Myself tell me a story about what you've worked on, what you learn from it why you made the decisions you did? Don't just give me a

link contacts. That doesn't give me anything about you. I want to hear about your journey to where you are now. What are the experiences you take something from every job you've ever had, even if it's I never want to do this thing again but what are the things that you're bringing with you to this interview that are exciting? We are hiring also for culture, add, we want to make sure that you are as excited to work as a peer, as we all are. So, knowing something about the company is crucial, but going build is out, it's super easy, that's the whole point.

So go and do one so that you have some Foundation. For it. And you can feel like both what the product is from a user perspective, as well as our aims and our values. And why would provide sodas When you interview remotely, are there any particular tools or software you use? And why did you choose them? It was similar to it is after your house that was built from the ground up to be a remote company. And we've been remote for going on 8 years. And so, we have only used Zoom for just really everyday working with the people who work at house, whether they're

in the same state as we are in a different country. And so really just being able to use are our tools that we do interviews using we do our yeah. We you soon to interview candidates and yeah you can kind of tell someone's comfortable with them and just how they themselves. Do they seem confident today? Maintain eye contact? Do they have a stable connection and and just do they seem like they would bring him by to make an easy transition at your working remotely. So I would just say exhume, which is what we used to communicate face-to-face every day and just

be able to just use that competently. Just gives me a sense that this candidate Beat that the bare minimum for working. Like we work. Yeah, I'd say the same thing except we use Google meet instead of Zoom but otherwise, you know, our intention with the interviews is really to have you show off the best version of yourself. And so we do not prescribe which tool to use if you was naughty or you work on the command line. We don't even tell you what, what language you should be using for a coding interviews. You tell us what you're going to use you. Bring your own environment

and figured in the way that you like the work and you're familiar working and then we'll go from there. Is it for us? It's a hundred percent, Zoom as well. Having a good connection, decent lighting. Headphones with a microphone on them. And you know, of a fun virtual background will always score any points. So lean into the tools remote candidates for teamwork, and communication skills, Yeah, for sure, I just when I'm involved in screening candidates for help Scout. A lot of that is just how we how

I tease out the experience in the question driving. So I asked them, you don't tell me a time when you disagreed with a colleague and you were wrong and they were rights and how did that go? And that gives me a lot of information about how they, you know, hopefully don't bring any Eagle to work. They can have the sketches based on facts not feelings. They can, they're willing to say I was wrong and and, and, and what did they learn from that? And so really is a lot of questions of cheese out. How have they work with others before and then in how they

communicate that experience and what they learn tells me about how they share information? Lisa, R Lawrence. So we have like I said before a core set of values that are very important to us that we typically ask questions around that and our values are default the transparency. So how do you communicate with others? And how it like, when you surface problems and how do you resolve those sorts of issues default to action, which doesn't necessarily mean run off and do the thing immediately. But, you know, if the if the change that you're

thinking about only affect you, go ahead and do it. If it's going to affect a hundred people, maybe talk it out first but like, go ahead and and own that are another value is empathy with a ego. So how do you relate to other people? How do you accept and deliver? Critical feedback? And we have a lot of energy around grocery feedback. So how do you engage with other humans and giving them feedback to help them grow? And how do you accept that? We have two questions around that and also you know, some of The questions are

very similar to what I want said, like in a situation where you had a conflict with a co-worker, how would you resolve it? Would you let it slide? Would you, you know, take it up a level? Would you work it out with them? How do you react to that type of situation just to hear how people interact in it and humans Ashton and because we are very intentional about our our team building, we have mechanisms for once. Folks are hired as we know not everyone has worked remotely before that's a benefit. If that's A+ if you have but not everybody has though, we have lots of really

great onboarding for how do you get involved with your team? And then we have lots of fun stuff where we get people involved like zappy hours and lots of fun slot channels where you can share your interest. So we typically tell people about the things in advance so that they can get ready for them. Cool. That sounds great. I think if you if you look at the interview styles that I was cheering previously, this kind of two buckets that they fall into one is tell us about yourself your past experience. Let me know who you are through the experiences that you've already had. And any other bucket

is? Let's work together, right? Let's work together on a pair programming. Let's work together on a problem solving where we get two people in a room, you being one in the interview interview or being the other and you actually work together to solve something. And so that's giving us a signal in terms of. How do you interact? How are you asking questions, or how are you guiding the discussion? Do you take the guidance from their feces types of things, right. So how are you interacting with the other person and just to get a sense of how easy that flow was, or whether there's any kind of red

flags, we pulled out of that? Yeah, in the interview process, what's your favorite interview? Question to ask and why So my my favorite interview question is very much geared for being kind of positive cuz I do want to. And I usually ask this last and I asked if things go well and we extend an offer to you. And you rejected, what would be your prediction for why? All right. And so I'm I like that question because one most kind of snow expected some, I'm giving them an opportunity to show me that I can think on

their feet. But also I'm looking for answers like You know, he'll Scout has these values and if during this process I realized that the company that I see on the website that the company that I'm talking to you then that's not going to be a great fit for me. Right back. That's a great answer because we do believe values and we try to make sure they come through in our process and that's a great answer is you don't offer me enough money right now but not that great. So that's why I really like asking that question.

Interesting pizza. So this is the one that I picked up from some screener questions that we used to ask on reference calls. But are you a firefighter or a fire marshal? So, do you like, when there is a crisis, you rush in and save the day? Is that your is that your happy place? Or do you like to set up rules and structures that prevent fires from happening? There's a wrong answer here. It's kind of an insight into how they like to work and how they went to problem solve. And then when I'm interviewing, my favorite question to ask is, what's your favorite part about

working for this company? And I want to hear stuff about like that they love their co-workers and that they're excited to come to work and they love the stuff that they're working on and that lets me know that that's like it. If you typically will catch people off guard and you can kind of, you can also say, like, you know, why did you, why did you join this company? Why did you come in work here? What is it about? The company that attracted you? So you can get some insight as to how they're feeling a little ground level. I'm inside, but I think that the questions to which there are no wrong

answers, are kind of my favorite, cuz it just gives you a little insight to the person. I'm not trying to trip anybody off. I really just want to hear about what their thought processes. That's really interesting twist. He took on that lease, I'd like going from the other direction to that thing is they're there is a key there which is you should be coming in with some questions of your own. And some of them can be these kind of creeks and generic questions and some of them should be much more Taylor it so. Well, there's like a number of different types of questions. I'd like to ask that

the one that I would highlight here is I just asked and it seems like a really simple question, why Shopify? And I think this really gets to that idea. Have you done any research? Do you have a reason that you want to come work for us? Are you looking for a job? Are you looking for a job with us? If you're looking for a job with us, what is it that stands out? And so I get two pieces of information here. I get information about how much research and excitement you have around the role. I also got information from the market with your part of that. The market of people where I went

marketing to do to try and find a pencil employees in the company. Right now until I I find it. This is just a really seemingly trivial or simple question, but there's an actual lot of information is quite a bit. Yeah, definitely for the candidates. What do you think are good questions for candidates to ask during the interview? I kind of already tipped my hand on this one, but I like to hear about like what excites people? Why do they, why do they like coming to work for this company? What is it that makes their day good. Are there any

things? It is their impression of the company, the same now as before they joined that's kind of a like. It does what it says on the package store thing. Like I believe that. Very transparent values and I see them every day and what I do. And so I want to know from somebody who's that a company like is, is that the truth? Like is is what you see at the public facing entity is that really true? Or when you left the lid, is there, some no other thing going on there? So I kind of want to hear about what is the real company that you're working for. Not just the pr brochure. Yeah. Mark my

favorite questions are all along the lines of this person has put a lot of thought into building software, you know, there's some general principles that, I think every company that builds software goes through in some of the nuances are different. But, you know, if someone may say, you know why? I've seen a struggle between product coming up with a vision and then the engineering team having trouble implementing that Vision, you know, how's that going at at health.org resonate with you or something? Like,

you know, I'm used to this kind of CI CD. And then, you know, usually verifying the bill is usually something that's very challenging as to, what I've seen happened to help that is this and do you do that? I help Scout. Right. So things like that, where this person has been in the trenches, they understand, you know, through daily first contact with new problems in bill. Software that they thought about those problems and not just kind of saw them quickly. Those questions really resonate that this person is really into crafting software and not just making commit to repositories.

Yeah, I like both those answers that said there's there's a lot of good there. So again, you can think about this, there's kind of if you're figuring out a strategy for interview in one of the strategies that you can take is you're going to speak with a number of people from the company. You're probably going to speak with six to seven people during your interview process. So, there are questions that you can ask to all of the people throughout the process and then you can get back to White. I am one, at least I had talked about earlier. I think both of you, which is trying to pull

out like, what what's the truth about the company and what's insistence in what people tell you and where the inconsistencies or maybe some areas that you can throw a Little Deeper by asking a similar question to everybody. You can actually see some of that come out. The other part of this is really asking questions that speak to your interest, right? And again the more homework to do about this the more in-depth you can get with your questions and then the better information that you can get out of this. Keep in mind. Again, this is a two-way process in your interviewing, the company. So you

won't understand the best that you can about that. So I had to request Compensation and benefits at where it's not surface-level questions, but where people really like, there is some new ones that they want to get into and understand like, what, what is the benefit strategies that the company employs, right? And that's quite different than tell me. You give me a list of benefits, which will give you on a website, cuz you can read that right things ruined, Career Development. How am I going to grow in my career opportunities? Do I have, you know, what opportunities have you had right? You

being why you asking me, interview work, those sorts of things as well, right? So questions, like that or round challenges is Lisa was talking about earlier at those sorts of things. I think are good questions that are open-ended and see where the interviewer takes it. And then you can actually probe little deeper and do a little reverse interviewing of your own. Drake Christ, given the current situation with a pen that make and everything. What's the number one piece of advice? You would give to a job Seekers right now. I

think I'm sorry practice interviewing is a perishable skill, most of us do it. Maybe once every couple years the people you're talking to interview pretty often and so do mock interviews call up a friend. Hop on the zoom say hey run through these questions. Right me or how I answer. Post tough questions ask me personal, not expecting by rehearsing. By practicing my do a mock interviews, your increasing, the increasing the chance, that you're not going to prep, you do your chat

to just because you just didn't practice enough, but that you were just able to explain yourself well enough in. So, you know, don't let the skills of interviewing be the deal-breaker between you and getting that job and I would say just practice rehearse. How you will be surprised at how much more comfortable and relaxed you are. If you rehearse I have a couple of answers here. One is apply for all the jobs, all the dogs that look interesting to you, don't fall into the Trap of thinking that you have to have a hundred percent of the list of qualifications

in order to even apply for the job. Worst case scenario, they say no other don't answer, you're not out anything women in particular and underrepresented groups tend to only apply for jobs. When they feel like they have a hundred percent of list qualifications. And if someone else supplies and they only have 50%, will they applied? And they got seen where you didn't reply so you have to be in there too. To do it. And then also I feel like some crucial questions for interview, he's going forward to the company are going to be around. What was your company's response during

pandemic time? What did you do to support? Your current employees were there layoffs, were their salary, reductions? Were there any sort of penalties for the people who were working for you? Where you able to continue business? What, did you offer your customers to help out with the pandemic and also, what sorts of things were you doing? During the areas where we needed some action on social justice, did you make any changes to your company? Did you examine your diversity policies? Did you take time off to learn? Did you give people the freedom in the space to express what they were going

through? Those are really important things. Now that I think probably wouldn't have occurred to anybody to ask pre-pandemic times but I think are really good indication of what the company's values are and whether or not they actually hold them or they just put them on the brochures. Yeah, I think that the biggest advice I would give here to pick something that's difference. Is actually the same advice. I would give you and your career and whether or not you're interviewing and looking for a new job or whether or not you have an existing job and that's the figure out what it

is that you want. What is it that you want out of the position? What is it that you want of working for this company? Or is he? You already have a job when you're looking for, say, a new opportunity within the company, what is it? I want to get out of that opportunity if you're looking for a promotion, what is it that you think you want to get out of getting a promotion, right? Maybe this actually isn't what you want. I think I and one was talking about this earlier and really did the idea of wanting to get something specific, I would have just, what are you in it for, right? And so as

an interviewer or a hiring manager, if you know what you want, it will be far easier for me and I think we'll get into this, at some point, maybe a little more, but now this comes through in your resume. This comes through in the conversations that you have, the less work that you have for me is an interviewer that easier my time is going to be in really, if you What you want you're going to be able to tailor everything that we do to your interest and ask who the hiring manager that true as a manager. That's there was just someone else who's a champion for you as well, right. It's it's

not necessarily easy saying and I don't mean to say, you have to know exactly. I want a position with this or that but what it what is important to you? Maybe there's a compensation and benefits package because you got people to take care of and the general engineering doesn't matter. You want to work on product and not internal tools and that's a big thing for you as well. Maybe you have a specific technology that you want to learn and develop and learning that where Ruby on Rails shop means that this is actually not the greatest opportunity for you. That's okay because the sooner you figure

out those types of and the answers to those types of questions and more you're going to be able to direct your effort because there really are a million companies that you could apply to. So Felicia Point apply to everything like that. What your pool is based on, you know, your own characteristics in your own criteria. Yeah definitely as a hiring manager aside from problem solving and communication skills. Are there any other essential skills you're looking for? Yeah, I have an answer but I do want a piggyback on what

Lisa Lawrence are both said yeah. Apply the all the things that is so crucial you miss, every shot that you never take. So shoot your shot, give it a gold. The worst thing that you the worst thing that can happen is that you never hear from that company. Again, right? Which is not a bad thing, but probably so apply to all the things. I I really love that one thing that I look for, as, if I really get skill, but is this person curious, right? Is there a curiosity? That comes through in the interview? And, you know, you can train for communication and problem-solving and

kind of get yourself up to Lisa base level, but it's hard to fake tree ocity and how they interact with me. Are they asking questions that I They were considering am I questioning my life decisions talking to this candidate because they're just so curious, right? And so just that's so awesome if I can see that and when I see that coming through and the candidate that helps me see that. Okay, no matter where I put this person, they're going to drive to get to some greater truth and in and I love seeing that. If I can rip on that. First one, I have five, an example of the apply to

everything for me after I finished my first year of undergrad. In computer science, they had a posting up for teaching assistants and Mike. Well, I'm going to a second-year student. They're not going to take me as a teaching assistant, right? But someone said that like when you feel that it's not a long application. So I filled it. An expected not to hear anything or just to hear a no, and sure enough to Weeks Later they're like, yeah, you're hired we need, we need lots of teaching assistants. We don't have enough, we have a huge class coming in the next year and all the sudden I was in

second year in a teaching assistant, which ended up being a great experience. And I did not expect to get it, but I got it only because I applied and some other friends kick themselves for not replying. So, I think that that really is true and it's, it's far more proof or know anyone who's not sure that you meet all of the requirements. Let the other person tell, you know, you don't need to say no for yourself. So excited to answer this actual question now that we're not talking, that's actual question, you know. So I think that there's no one talked about last night, and I think ability to

learn fits in that communication skills. Also, a big broad topic. And I think, when people think communication skills, they often think my job, right? I do need to talk one of the biggest things that you can pull out that he's in that bucket that many people do not demonstrate is the ability to listen. And we see this all the time with people not following the directions, not following the excuse that the interviewers are giving them and this is like a automatic red flag. Like, when we get to the end of it, that this is a person who does not listen to other people, they weren't taking the

keys, they were doing their own thing and then we really have to see was a consistent wrote all the interviews, but this is something that comes up all the time. Really? That ability to listen and really hear what other people are telling you, I think it does fit in the communication bucket. But I want to call it is because I don't think that it's necessarily what people think of when I say communication skills. That's all. I have like a little part 2 about the apply for all the things. If it's a company that you're really interested in working for, don't take one either no

response or a negative response and have that. Be the end of the story. Had some place that you really want to work. Continue to follow them, look for more opportunities game or skills. You're not the same person tomorrow that you are today and that might fit better. We have in our Retreat, we always have trivia and this you're one of the questions was, how many times did you apply to that here before you were hired? And the company average is 3. And there was someone at my table who had applied this time, I don't know that I have the, the the tenacity to a flyer. There was

something six times if you rejected five of them but they got in. So continue to pursue things that interest. You think that match your values, things that are places where you want to go. Not today, maybe tomorrow, so do that. And then the thing that I Looking for and it's kind of a long the same lines of communication, but be able to tell me a story about the why of a question? I don't just want to hear a mechanical answer. I would like to hear some of you in that answer. Why did you choose this solution? What was it about it? That works for you was at the most expedient, cool. Cuz

sometimes we have to do that was at the most challenging awesome. Then you're up for New Challenges. Like I kind of want to hear a little bit about why you chose the things. You chose the way. You're answering the question. I want to hear that. The thing that's just below the surface. I don't want to just hear that when I answer, Cool. 11 example, Lisa is really great. There's there's there's something else that's in there, that's it. You know, a rejection or if someone says no, all that means that there wasn't a

match and a fit for this particular job with your particular experience. At this particular time. It's right today, it doesn't mean that there will never be a match but right now there wasn't a match and so it's not a comment on you was a person. It's a comment on the current like just right now the match between you in this position. All right. When you're interviewing someone and you get a resume, what are the first thing that you will look for in his resume? This is a really interesting question for me,

because I've I've I've done the resume screening part of it. And I had somebody asked me before they sent me about the resumes, what I was looking for, and then they didn't do that. So, like that was the person who was listening before is, is not just a link to your GitHub repo. I want to know what you learned from that project. Like, for give me the link that, like, what technology to use. Why did you use it? What did you learn? That's what I care about. This is especially important for code School Gratz because you don't have a wealth of experience. Tell me about the

projects that you worked on. Not just like we built an app to match with pet Walkers. Like I I want to know why what text. Did you use. Why do I care about it? What did you do? I want to hear a little bit about your previous experience, in that same contact. Like what did you say? My job. Did you provide any valuable anywhere there? Did you increase number somehow? Did you solve a problem? Every job is essentially a problem looking for a solution to every job posting has within it. Some sort of problem that the company is trying to solve by hiring a human to do that. What

can you bring to me? That, that reflects that? So don't have it when you can definitely have one static resume, but make sure that when you were applying for a specific job that you're highlighting the things in your resume that are listed in the job description frequently it is a keyword, partial is going to get you in the door. So if you don't have any of the things that match the position, I'm looking for, it's not going to happen. So make sure that you're at least reading the job description. Well, enough to know what are the things that they're going to be looking for and make

sure that you had those things out of highlighted, at least included on your resume. So that I know that they are a thing that you have experience with. What's the first thing that I look for? When I see a resume is, how long is it? So sometimes I get like 6 page resumes, I don't want to read 6 pages. So two pages, Max for me. Anything beyond two pages is automatically like I'm already lost interest in those two pages. I agree with what you said Lisa. It's really you're trying to tell a story and I'm trying to make this

as easy for me as a hiring manager or recruiter as possible, right? So don't just dump in a whole bunch of facts in general. Don't tell me what the company's did. I see this a lot where there's like a paragraph summarizing with the company's did but what I want to know is what did you do? And to your point Lisa, what did you learn and what was the impact of the work that you did, right? So it's much less interesting that I rocoto Java. It's much more interesting that I don't think this Brazilian, you know, what is a structure that resulted in X number of improvement? If you have that,

right? Something like that. So much more around the impact of the war really focused on what is it that you exactly did as opposed to what did the team do or what? Did the company do? Yeah. Very much very, very much alive with what Lisa Lawrence have been. Say. I'm looking for the story. What's the story that you're telling Angie and you have about 45 seconds to tell me the story? So, yeah, it's, it's waiting way to give me that story. But, you know, not just to what Laura said, not just what the company did. But what was your your impact? And if you can show me the evolution of your

career here, maybe at one company, you were a back-end developer. And then you decide at the next company, to go more to the front and we'll try to read that story and why? And and what were the outcomes, right? Not just this framework bird or this language. It's really cool that you wrote react it would be cooler if you let a project to make it easier for react developer has a good company to work in your repository that you reduce the time to trade featured by 30% something like that, right? Having that numerical way to put bike to your outcomes. That's really powerful.

I would say the thing to keep in mind at least that I give a resume writers. The advice of all the time is thank Highway billboard not novel. I need to absorb that quickly as I drive by because I've on one side you've got maybe a minute of my attention as I'm screening resumes to grab me. So don't don't don't give me six pages. Yeah. Points keep in mind what the purpose of your resume is like, what is it? You want to get, I would have put in a resume together, right? If you're putting resume together, you want to get to talk to somebody, like the point is to get to an interview, so you

need to differentiate yourself enough. So when everyone's looking at this in 45 seconds, yours is going to stand out enough and he's going to say, I want to talk to this person, right. That's what you're after. With the resume beyond that, you got to convince some by speaking and I'm getting older. So can we do a little bit bigger than 9.5? Maybe 11 and comics? And by the way, just enough style, so that I get a peek into your, your, your aesthetic. But like maybe don't give me that. Highly overly designed like chart of your skills that

don't really make any sense. Like, Sometimes words are better than pictures. I think you're saying don't use those on the online, resume generation. End up looking the same person asked me what they should send, it was for a group of coastal grass. I ended up getting 15 identical and I mean, identical resumes, just the names for different. That was it. And I was like, maybe offer them. The advice that they should each pick a different template after you sent, but maybe they are not serving them. Well, by all making them the same one. So, put a little, don't don't

buy a template online. You can take some inspiration from them, but it's fine. What you're doing is great and unless you're hiring unless you're looking for a design job, if you don't design your resume too much, I think in the interest of time, I will pass forward a little bit so I think Someone in the audience is very interested. I get home or portfolio. When can I share portfolio websites? Do you look at them? Like and when you look at them, what are you looking for?

Should know. I'm not going to go Pawn to your GitHub repository and unless you've given me a reason to, I'm not going to go Pawn to get up repository, I don't care. Like, I'm sure you did fine. Want to know why and what you learn from this project. Why did you build this thing? And why do I care that you built? This thing. Tell me that story. Otherwise, I'm not sure if I've gotten your resume, I'm not going to click on any links, really. I'm just going to read what you have there, and so, if you could give me a snapshot of why this project

mattered, that's way more important to me than that. You have 17,000, you know, Objects in your GitHub repo or you have all these commits. I don't. But that doesn't impress me like it's is cool and it makes a really cool chart with all the green squares on it. But also like I care about why the tools that you use why you chose them what you got out of it, what you learned. Those are the things that matter to me not that you have them. So here's a bit of a different approach. I will click on the links in your profile, if you put them in there, and It's maybe not for the reasons that

you're thinking that way if you listen to get him, profiler, you send that to me and I click through there and you have very few contributions. That's telling the like, what did you create this profile just to be able to, because you're not actually very active on, get up. In fact, one of the things that I do, look for if you provided one of these community site profiles, is how you interact with other people. And this is the kind of thing. We're probably not going to get fired based on your interactions in a profile like this, but you will get rejected from the process. If you've had very poor

interactions with other people in these in these places that have some sensitivity here because I've always worked at places that had proprietary code basis. So my GitHub repo with isn't like I have a few, a handful of personal projects with the majority of my work is behind, both the doors that no one can see. So, like, I don't I don't look down on somebody who doesn't have the time and stuff and then every pole because I know how that feels, but also like if you got it, right, it has to be substituted has to have to like I would like to YouTube interacted with other humans. What's more

impressive to me than a singular GitHub? Repo is any contributions you've made to an open source project. That's that shows more to me about how you work with other humans, rather than some awesome project that you do it yourself, which is super cool. But also, like, I'm hiring you to work on a team. I want to see how you work on a team rather than your individual. You know, anybody can hack something out in the day that's that's just there's without having to deal with other humans. But did you have to run that past somebody else and have them approver or reject it? That's the thing I'd

like to say Yeah. I mean they don't make or break your candidacy. I think they're nice to have. I do I am sister to the fact that you do have to have a certain I wish to do that, right? You got to have the time outside of your day job to commit to, you know, this code base. And so I am careful to not put too much weight on them but was really impressive, is it? You know, there's some mission-driven GitHub repo that you that shows your passions. Our friend, my name is Tiffany a bell. She's taking it with the Ion on Twitter made the

human utility which is I think it's closed for a spot. I used to pay water bills for people who don't have access to clean water rights in Flint Michigan, right? If you doing something like that, that shows me a lot in the fact that you're contributing to cold as that's mission-driven, tells me a lot about you said, something like that. I would be a nice check and what I used to assess. Do I want to move forward with you? Open up respect and much, much more about your interests than about the fact that it's on GitHub, or like a coding side at all, like that, that could be, you know, your

involvement in a charity or, you know, some other event that you put on or something. It really doesn't have to be cold related in that respect. I guess this is. Prior to the pandemic, a portion of shopify's, engineering team actually worked from an office. How was the transition to our remote? Yeah, so my team was fairly distributed. Although I worked out of an office and I had probably a third to a half. My team was working in an office setting and so I think there's two pieces to this and I'm not

the first one to talk about this. There's working from home and then is working from home during a pandemic. And so we leave all this out, explicitly, functionally, from a systems perspective, the shop. If I made a decision long ago, are you systems that are all accessible over the public internet. So, from that perspective, we didn't have to get set up at home from, you know, our infrastructure perspective, but we did need people to get set up at home. In terms of setting up a home office, creating a space to work and figuring out how they were going to work with a new constraints that they

had on them. A lot of people who have their caregivers either for the children to their parents. People have roommate. People are living in isolation. All of these cases are quite different even in the same category and so that's been the real challenge for us is, is finding out what that is and how to deal with it. As a company, I think that we've approached this really well and it's something I'm quite proud of as like a senior leadership team that we've been able to do this and that's for work with the individuals, on our team and create structure that works for them. For many people, this

has resulted in reduced work hours. It's resulted in non-standard schedule. So something we were on two hours off, two hours, and then again, on 2 hours off 2 hours, so they can swap it with their partner. Who's also got responsibilities at home or doing things like putting more of the communication asynchronously because I'm sharing a space, a small space with someone else. And so being in meetings all day long or even just the fact of trying to be in video meetings all day long and be very draining. I think they work. We're approaching kind of be Breaking point for the flip side

of this, which is people who really loved being in an office setting, love being around other, people are really finding me of being distance to be a challenge and that's something where I don't have a solution for that with the current state of the world. But it's something that I'm quite aware of, and building connection, and allowing for some sort of interaction. Even though we're not doing in person, interaction has been a real challenge. So I think the company so did quite well into our remote work environment. I think that we've been very quick to make decisions around this and some people

up for 6 past the best that we can in the type of environment. We a child fire looking at the long-term. So we we've announced that wore a digital by default, which you can think of is remote first company. I'm so we're following that leads of my two on panel this year and This is an announcement that we made, and now, we're figuring out how to do that. But the acknowledgement is there, what we're doing right now is not the best version of work from home and that this will get better over time and we're designing for that future as well. Lisa and 180 comments about working from home

and working from home during an epidemic. I think very much like what Lauren said, we are helping people adjust to having additional demands on their schedule, folks, with small children have had to transition to being homeschooling. That's a whole new, a whole new adventure, that's not an easy transition for them. So my message to my team was take care of yourself and your family first set up the structures that you need. Let us know what we can do for you work. The hours that make the most sense for you. We have the luxury of this

flexible scheduling and because we're Global Enterprise somebody's online, 24 hours a day. You want to work at 2 in the morning your time cuz that feels good. Great. But also set limits for yourself, make sure that it's this point. You're not always working because it's super easy. When there's nothing else going on with the pandemic to just throw yourself into work and work too many hours. We seen some productivity stuff like that. Not super excited about because it needs people are working too many hours that we're trying to moderate that but also like not everybody's into Animal

Crossing. So you need to get have something to do. Whatever works for you to have some down time is really important to us and I've been as sensitive as I can to, my team's knees, whatever time they need to handle. Their stuff is been my priority. Yeah, I wouldn't say what can help Scott's been fantastic because we were built to be a remote company. If you've been thrust into working from home, it's easy to make that feel like living at work, right? Which is not the best experience and not only that. But you are also working with probably a spouse is working from home. And there's kids who

you had to help them with their homework. So this is not really the best working remotely experience. I hope it isn't Sarah folks on that. But to what Lisa said do what you can. Hopefully you have a very strong support of team at the dealership level. Who's being kind compassionate and patient? This is not normal. There are things happening right now. There are not normal and so you should not beat yourself up for not being how you normally feel as I would say, do your best lean on each other and trust your leadership to give you some space during this difficult time. Thank you.

Yes, thank you so much for sharing. All these interesting. Insights about know your team's hiring processes. I loved all the interview questions that you guys shared. See you all later. Thank you.

Cackle comments for the website

Buy this talk

Access to the talk “Nail Your Next Developer Interview: Shopify, Zapier and Help Scout | Arc.dev Remote Career Summit”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Ticket

Get access to all videos “Remote Career Summit 2020”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Ticket

Interested in topic “Human Resources Management”?

You might be interested in videos from this event

June 4, 2020
Online, London
7
421
diversity, employing , in-house, inclusion, inclusion strategy, online business conferences, online conferences, online events, recruiting

Similar talks

Andrew Gobran
People Operations Generalist at Doist
+ 2 speakers
Laïla von Alvensleben
Head of Culture & Collaboration at MURAL
+ 2 speakers
Sacha Connor
Founder and CEO at Virtual Work Insider
+ 2 speakers
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Ryan Choi
Director, Work at a Startup at Y Combinator
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Weiting Liu
Founder & CEO at Arc.dev
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Buy this video

Video
Access to the talk “Nail Your Next Developer Interview: Shopify, Zapier and Help Scout | Arc.dev Remote Career Summit”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Conference Cast

With ConferenceCast.tv, you get access to our library of the world's best conference talks.

Conference Cast
944 conferences
37487 speakers
14316 hours of content