Events Add an event Speakers Talks Collections
 
Duration 58:28
16+
Video

How Remote Design Teams Collaborate & Hire | Arc.dev Remote Career Summit

Courtny Cotten
Remote Design Team Lead at Microsoft
+ 4 speakers
  • Video
  • Table of contents
  • Video
Remote Career Summit 2020
June 26, 2020, Online, USA
Remote Career Summit 2020
Request Q&A
Remote Career Summit 2020
From the conference
Remote Career Summit 2020
Request Q&A
Video
How Remote Design Teams Collaborate & Hire | Arc.dev Remote Career Summit
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Add to favorites
73
I like 0
I dislike 0
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
  • Description
  • Transcript
  • Discussion

About the talk

Designers from top companies shared how they reached their positions and their current team hiring processes. They provided useful tips for job applicants on how to display their skills to hiring managers, and also how to discover potential opportunities through networking. They also discussed how they work together as a remote team, and what tools they use to collaborate on design work.

[Resources]

🌐 Remote Career Summit: https://bit.ly/RCS2020-event

[Speakers]

- Courtny Cotten: Design Lead at Microsoft

- Yitong Zhang: Staff Product Designer at Coinbase

- Ted Goas: Senior Product Designer at Dialpad

- Shannon Crabill: Senior eCommunications Consultant at UnitedHealthcare

- Hosted by Jason Rodriguez: Community and Product Evangelist at Litmus

[Learn More]

- Arc: https://m.arc.dev/yto

- Microsoft: https://www.microsoft.com/

- Coinbase: https://www.coinbase.com/

- Dialpad: https://www.dialpad.com/

- UnitedHealthcare: https://www.uhc.com/

- Litmus: https://www.litmus.com/

Arc connects exceptional remote developers with great organizations. Arc developers have worked with companies like Spotify, Fivestars, Chegg, Hims, and more. Level up your remote career with Arc.

About speakers

Courtny Cotten
Remote Design Team Lead at Microsoft
Yitong Zhang
Staff Product Designer at Coinbase
Ted Goas
Senior Product Designer at Dialpad
Shannon Crabill
Senior eCommunications Consultant at UnitedHealthcare
Jason Rodriguez
Community & Product Evangelist at Litmus

Courtny champions the creation of modern and holistic user interfaces, advocating a constant sense for usability and user experience. Looking back on over 13 years of work experience in a variety of industries, his insights stem from a traditional background in typography, journalism, and web design. He prides himself on being a versatile and multi-talented designer, coach, and leader. Courtny graduated from the University of Indianapolis with a Major in Visual Communication Design and an emphasis in Human Computer Interaction. Over the course of his career he has had the opportunity to work with multi-billion-dollar behemoths to small start-ups. He has extensive knowledge in executing best in class user experiences for a variety of technology platforms and business sectors.

View the profile

I’m a reliable product designer and front-end developer working on websites, applications, and HTML emails. I believe design is about taking the complex and chaotic and making it accessible to people. I design things to be understandable, readable, responsive, and as fast as possible. Since 2001, I’ve been trying to create work that is cool enough to show my friends and honest enough to show my parents. I’m highly adaptable, can wear many hats, and manage projects. My goal is to become a designer-manager hybrid, splitting time between hands-on work and managing / mentoring a small team.

View the profile

Experienced in Ruby on Rails and JavaScript-based programming and a background in email development and graphic design. Possess strong skills in technical writing and public speaking that help technical teams maintain quality in a high volume environment. Experience working in financial services and healthcare sectors. Interested in FinTech, EdTech, and HealthTech.

View the profile

I’m a designer, writer, and marketer. I write and speak a lot about email marketing, design, and development and I work hard to show people how to get the most out of their email marketing, grow their businesses, and make genuine connections along the way. I’m currently the Email Marketing Manager at Bonfire, where I help community organizations, movements, and creators design and sell custom products so that they can keep doing good work in the world. Before Bonfire, I was the Community & Product Evangelist at Litmus, which is a fancy way of saying that I taught people how to make better emails—typically through writing some wildly popular articles and ebooks and hosting more webinars, workshops, and conference talks than I can even remember. For a few years there, I was responsible for producing and hosting Litmus Live—the industry-leading conference for email marketing professionals. Before Litmus, I lived the agency life as an email and web designer. I’ve been in the industry for over a decade and have gained a thorough understanding and appreciation of the web and the technologies that power it. I’m an expert in HTML and CSS and a strong advocate for the open web, accessibility, and building inclusive communities online. I live in Michigan with my wife, two daughters, and a growing collection of musical instruments (mostly ukuleles and a few guitars).

View the profile
Share

How come everyone Welcome to our round table? For how design teams has successfully collaborate and hire remotely? We are waiting for one more person to pop in but while we're doing that, I would like to kick off some introductions. So my name is Ted goes. I am a product designer at dialpad. I work remotely from my home in New Jersey, and before I was at, dialpad, I was at stackoverflow working enough but I think is a first-class remote culture for about 4 years.

Only one chicken at work for Microsoft, I actually am focused on the documentation and learning platform and I am a design team lead. Their I've been working for Microsoft about the last year and I also worked at stacker up though before with Ted and I am a living and working out of Indiana. I can go next song, I am a staff product designer at Clan base. I've been here for a little over two years now, I've worked a lot of things most most most most country has been on the main

recently. I've been on the design system team and I have been working. Like I'm sure many of you as a remote since covid. So interesting. And I'm Shannon. I'm an email developer for UnitedHealthcare. I mostly doing b2c Communications. I'm outside of email. I'm absorbing just about any software. Engineering course. This is fine. I'm really enjoy CSS JavaScript. I'm working remotely for my home in Maryland, and I've been up for about a year now. And I am just Airi. Guess I already knew everything today

but like sad and Shannon. I come from the email World, which is an interesting world to come from the community, and Vangelis for a company called, that makes tools for developers to build better email campaigns. Track Em, toss them, all that good stuff from I'm right outside of Detroit. And I've been a remote for about seven years now, which is been awesome. And I don't think I can change it for anything in the world right now. Talk. Little bit about, you know, your current roles. But I'd love to hear you a

little bit about your experiences as a designer, how you got started as a designer and kind of work your way up to you where you are right now. So I'm looking at my screen here. I see you telling if you don't mind going first sure, I have to look most embarrassing story, it's all set the bar real low and everybody else. Got after me, I grew up really like me anime and watch a lot of anime and got sucked into the world as a kid. I don't know, y'all remember that great. Okay. Some of our form of Eevee enara and

stay at me for animes and eventually just decided I like Photoshop was in the real career, I'm going to business school. Find the grab which like was very smart in retrospect being very sarcastic right now and it's kind of like a goddamned the broken to starting a company with a friend of mine. So for about two years, did it start up? And then eventually full day and at that point I was like, I can do everything a little bit and nothing really well, as you should probably pick something and I think of all the skills that I had Mine was the one that really like spoke the most to me. So and

that's enough since I've always been a little bit of a generalist and I still carry that with me in my work. So I could that work at a studio for a little bed and I'm now at work, a client base and I've always found myself a little bit like wearing different hats sometimes the p.m. sometimes a really shity engineer and a lot of side projects to build a plug-in for figma recently caught a flow. And before that, but the reference website to Mark a page is called Corny. How about you? Yes, and my career actually started when I was

in high school. My father had ran a newspaper. So I actually had to build a website. So, this was back when, like, literally were using tables and putting together images and just like, throwing up, advertisements that way they weren't really like. Any, some of us are still using a table, I would not take that. But at the time that was like, Cutting Edge, right? It was amazing to have a website. And this was like, you know, 2007/2008 until I saw that there was like an opportunity there to do things on the web on a computer.

And I went to college for, I just got basically a traditional graphic design degree at that time, they were really programs focused on like interaction design or anything of that nature. I really ended up falling into a good, some good luck. I ended up in a stopper engineering firm that didn't have any design. Johnson. Also I ended up coming into the, the company to do graphics, and I ended up actually working on software. So that's kind of how I got my star in software and building web products evolved from their ended up at Sakura flow billing things and the rest

kind of History are you training? Summer story. I've went with the traditional graphic design background cuz I thought it was a good base for whatever I did to you later in life. And then when I graduated I got a lot of so you do what they sure I guess. So I learn to code of my own and I think I had one when I was building the tables which is really weird for the Thousand Mile wish let you both as email Designer and developer and now do more of the design but I do work a lot.

And Todd. Yeah, I feel like a little weird that's running my origin story. I hear a lot of stories about how folks, just fell into it by doing a website for the friends band or are hacking away on their Myspace page back in the day. But I actually went to school for this stuff but it was really early. This is like 2000-2001. So a lot of times the professor in the class would just be like, learning this stuff together. I did take a year of computer science when I first started. Was it really that good at it so I I transition to the

graphics world but the engineering I got stuck with me. Since I'm also a little bit of a front end developer and also an email developer And yeah, after that is a graduated hop from one job to the next, but I actually did fall into the remote aspect of it. You know, my last couple years ago, I just had you a couple bad week set. My job fairly common story, I think and I knew Courtney actually from drip and when I saw a opportunity that stack Overflow opened

up, I asked him about it. He encouraged me to reply, I went through the process and at the time I was just looking for another job and stack, Overflow, just happened to be remote. It was the first remote job I ever had. And yeah, after that the rest is history. I've been remote for the past four and a half years, something like that. Awesome. I might be here a little bit about what your team makeup. Looks like. I have to look, we have a good mix of kind of smaller teams in the

in a Microsoft, pretty large GM it so maybe we could go into what those teams look like. How many people there are? What those different roles look like before it starts talking about. Apple donut lots lots, keep an hour or so if you want to get started. Southern design team Aquarius is now 34 people including research and brand and writing product design. On that team is around 6:20. Something I work on a team that has 11 11 Engineers ish and it 10 11, Engineers for my immediate team. I'm a big rewrite projects. There's a lot of people

on this team and I recently transitions remote with this team, but a couple of a couple of the engineers there have always been the New York which is not our main office. Party. What's the your team at? Microsoft, look like these days. You'd be surprised that you would think that Microsoft would be super mature in this space and there. Absolutely. Not like this is very new for that juuzou. Might seem specifically the content learning team within, like cloud in the eye, they've been moving towards remote or they're kind of

like the first team within Microsoft kind of adopting this remote first focus and it's actually hybrid right now. So my team makeup is we have many, many people in Redmond for the design team. There's three researchers, three information Architects, like four or five designers at all are in the Redmond office. And then we have really are p.m. team is actually more distributed in our design team. So I was the first kind of design hire to focus on recruiting in like retention of Irmo employees, and kind of best practices coming from a place like Sakura close at I really consider it like a

leader in that that aspect of setting, good ground work having good principles, having a good support network. So, yeah, I like definitely learning its young there. It's kind of fledgling. So I think that there is certainly more resources now than there were seven years ago. Jason. You know, like there were a lot of people working remote, seven years ago, 17 years ago and did a lot of resources out there to make it easier and do it properly. Write scaling up is a lot easier. So, that's kind of what a team looks like right now. A

refuse from like Basecamp, Yeah, all of our stuff kind of comes from the base camp world, that's where we kind of learn how to do things by. There's so many more resource now, which is absolutely amazing. How about you, what's what's your team makeup look like? Shirts and my team right now is about five or six of us all email developers and then one I guess technical architect. So more of the the technical side of working with email. The design team is separate from what I do specifically. I'm not sure if they're remote or not but my thing is too much.

Then. Yeah, I also work on a pretty small team here. I think the product design team is US less than 10 people. I think it's 8, something like that, we don't have dedicated. Ux researcher has yet. I'm fighting for that. But right now, we have to tag team that won with our product managers and they have marketing design as a separate discipline. Like marketing, engrossed to sign up at the Ghana team is pretty small toy one to two people. So but the fact that we're growing like, were the company's actually doing pretty

well in these in these times. So what other things I am excited to do is kind of grow and Define some of these processes and build the team here, which is one of the big things that attracted me to the job. So, Vice, I was watching the statue in Rocky bars, which was all about the interview process and the hiring process especially remote. And I'd love to hear how you treat your team's goes about firing especially remotely, but maybe first talked a little bit about your experience for your interview

process for your current role, especially if that was something you had to go through remotely and maybe after that kind of a contrast it to you. What your current hiring process looks like. Digest a repeat, the questions. I understand that you're saying in like walk through how we got in through our current role as look like it kind of successful and process, but I think that's what a lot of people would love to hear what I hear. What are the ways you got that? That's, that's why I'll come. Yep. I guess since we're doing the same order. I'll just

go ahead and then I am, I was working on a sec. I said those of you who don't know, there is a climax is a crypto company. You can think of it as a CUB bank for Bitcoin. But like big one is not the only thing happening in crypto and like in like early in early 2017 there was this app called cryptokitties. I don't know if you guys are part of it, but it was like, Neopets made Bitcoin kind of deal and not like wildfire. And for a while that you have to like buy these, like Crystal Neopets for the hundreds of dollars, that's crazy.

I should make a tracker for iPod expensive. These kitties are so instead of working on like a Tracker, like somebody had like already done most of it at that day the data and I just have to skin it and I'm kind of Scott connected with a bunch of designers in crypto and one of them was the the woman who laughed at at LED design. At the time, her name is You should come hang at, you like that and add the time, you're at about a little less than 300 people. So there was a strong carryover culture War trials from the early days of the company and so

like it was pretty common practice but I'll just come in for like a week or two work with the team and like if that worked out and people liked working with each other and they were just be no interview and you just like the offer does a little bit to do a tattoo Easter the contractor at the end of it, like we all liked working with each other. So that's how I got the offer of climates. We are now a thousand one hundred person company and everything works anymore. It's scale. So we transition to, a fairly Standard Process. There's the recruiter screen hiring manager, screening, then

you'd be on, site on side is a parkour. Presentation for about an hour. And then you have like 1011 on two chats with the stakeholders. So that's usually a PN, an engineer, a designer or two, and the hiring manager. And finally, the recruiter, while we were still in office, we used to describe the entire design team to show up and thanks for the candidate to, really get a sense of like, who they are. But also for them, to get a sense of who we are, as a team, we haven't quite figured out how to replace that,

you know, people were like reasonably Charming on the team at coinbase. And that always helps close the deal, but now we don't have to do that anymore. We're trying to figure out how to Amanda What tools do you use right now? Then. I end up those kind of interviews. Yeah. Hangouts Hangouts, calendar, a couple different things better, hang up in calendar is just better for us. Any more news for people that your attempt at Microsoft at the current hiring process contrasted with what we did is stackoverflow

because I think it's very unique to see the two sides like at Microsoft, they have basically adopted the standard hiring process right across all teams. So it's not necessarily oriented towards like, Ramona Tires, which is interesting because it requires basically the individual, you know, if you make it to the recruiter screen in that the hiring manager screen, you come on site to Redmond and you make your pitch. So you will literally come in with the foreplay unless they Hae show us what you have like, what? Do you want to tell us and talk to us about which I, I really actually like

that there was not like a fat stack Overflow, we had a distinct test series and it was like pretty intensive mean you were going to spend quite a bit of time on it. You would get paid and I was awesome and you get real access to the team but it was very it was nuts. Much less about like 15 your own story and being like a a Storyteller in like having a presence in more about going to be really methodical with your work and show your work. And then how do you integrate live with the team? Because I we really focus on like providing a channel for them to talk to the actual people that would work

with on a project, right. You have access to the p.m. and other people like data people on the team to pull numbers for you if you wanted it. Sometimes we actually end up using those solutions that we pay the people for their time and we would be able to kind of see the contrast I'm thinking. So it was kind of cool what's acrophobia cuz I had the test process but on the other side it might not be the same strength for everybody. I know me personally I like My story and go in and tell it the way I want. And so am I. That's kind of how it is.

You go in there? Tell your story and then you interview you the rest of your day is going to blocked out to one-on-one interviews with a kind of watch it through a series of question, right? Standards questions then see how you perform. So I'm, I would say like, Just just really focusing on, like, perfecting your story, right? Like how can you prove that you can impact the team in some way. What's what's that storytelling session actually look, like, like what are the largest except that you have, you know, your portfolio off. You have like a pole like pitch deck around yourself as you want.

I mean, that other thing that I kind of liked about it, you know, I was actually able to build a sigma like presentation, right? Like I do the presentation with kind of a pseudo wire frames and prototypes in it. So I could click through and talk to it as I'm presenting like the the the slides are reanimating and it's not just a slight. It's actually like you. I like, you know. And so you have to have a screen that you can use and it's a, you know, a boardroom of people sitting around a board table. But once again, I think they're certainly like things that that favors a favor certain

types of people. Especially if you really get your story on point, so it's definitely changed. We've hired two people on our team there recently. And obviously, they can't travel to Redmond so you schedule them blocked out and so you don't get those like little conversations happening between. Like, when you are walking somebody to a room, right? You know, they're walking, you say room in to kind of get a feel for the personality. So I know it's a little bit of that has been removed from the process. I'll have to weigh in on the sigma vs. Go bxb debate

that's currently raging in the stage fat from hiring practices troll figuring that like you know, I think I'm like them. Like I did a lot of spam actually really clear. Direct message have his role at the company. Would you be interested in learning more about it? And where is it located on a remote on a cool phone call with the company. But I've heard of that selling their previous role and in a couple chat, there were a few months with the hiring manager and I'm pretty sure my perspective and I don't remember doing a design tester. Do tests or anything, which looking back as maybe a

little surprising, but I guess it worked out in my, in my case. Do you want to describe your experiences? So like I just started at dialpad about a month ago. So this is all still very fresh in my mind, but I was hired as a full-time remote person from the start. So I just expected the entire interview process to be done online and it was a dial pad, does have some offices in the Bay Area and then Vancouver, those are the two big ones. So obviously, you know, especially now, you know, traveling to do an on-site is not really

possible. So everything was done over video. Everything moved pretty quickly. As far as the interview stages, it was pretty comfortable to just a regular on-site interview process. And yeah, just since I've been through this now twice since I've interviewed for to remote jobs, I would just say that there's not really that much difference between an on-site and remote interview, other than just like the logistics of the interview itself. You know, it's the same to you. You go through a screen or maybe you talk to

the HR recruiting, you talk to design teams, maybe talk to a couple other teams. You'll be working with all the steps were pretty, pretty much the same from my past office jobs. So if I can offer one bit of advice, it's that, if you're going for a remote job, don't get caught up on the fact that it's remote just approach it as you would any other interview. Find it so corny. Talked a little bit about that Microsoft at storytelling, kind of fashion and it looks like I'll be gone through a couple of different. I got some ways of showing off your skills. I love to hear

from you too. And see if there's what why you think the best way or designers to show off those skills. As their folk saying, Hunter portfolio. Like doing all in their portfolio, is it showing off workings? How old are likely to get a burrito? What are those out there? Two about to try to make that job search little bit easier. I got the same order if we're going to ask, I think my I think you'll probably find a lot of this on the internet already. I think the one thing that I have that is I feel like maybe a little different is to reach out directly to designers, and I

think that is probably the things I tell people the most. And that's also been personally, what's been successful for me, most people who work at companies are incentivised to refer you and to bring you into a company, if you are get like they get paid to do that, and it's not like they're even doing you a favor. There's is doing themselves a favor at the end of the day, so like they're like, pretty open do this. Since I think of every time you reach out to somebody cold that they're like, you're just kind of like stirring. Like, you know, a couple thousand dollars there may potentially

because like, if they refer you and successful, don't like her in a referral bonus. And the way that I would encourage people to try, it is to just, like, reach out for casual chat, yellow. Like, I like her a lot about like, you, no company. And like, you guys seem Need a really cool Works. Wanted like a coffee. No, like specifically and just that I chat and you can a person. You like this table should report established that you're like a reasonably good designer. I'm interested in like this job. You know, like you want to like, refer me and sometimes that's a no or yes. And if you get

a yes, you tend to be a bit, a short circuit, a lot of the early screening, which is where I find a lot of people get lost. Like, there's always these horror stories of people going through and like Appliance, like dozens of places like that you get to Short Circuit by just directly reaching out to email people that you even know their and honestly, the pirate from people that you could reach out to is usually a little better than the recruiters and you also mad at you, you're also probably able to reach out to a couple of people for Company. Please don't spam everyone that's not

nice and you'll get caught and people will be like this is weird but like if you like and like you have something to talk about That's a pretty reasonable. I think that's fantastic advice and it's like a lot of people probably run in that situation. We're so we talk in a recruiter and they don't really know the domain that well, or they don't know what they are actually supposed to be looking for saying, don't come from a design or engineering involve the background. So, short circuiting that and going directly to those team members is really in a light. What are the best

like platforms for doing that? You think obviously feel like nobody likes being spammed, on LinkedIn. I'm getting all those random ass messages by forms that you think are better for doing that kind of tactic. I'm going to sound really like this kind of obvious for that you should email people. Yeah. Most people have their email. If there are designer and they have like some what if an online presence, don't have their e-mail, readily broadcasted on the interwebs and like it's pretty easy to get up and just email them. The red like a nice subject line and be

friendly and usually out of work. Call me. How about you any tips for the best way for people to kind of show off their skills or what they should have at the ready before they start? I love to see you. Like when somebody has a vision for themselves, like they know what they're super power is, you know, and they really kind of enhance that because all of us are unique, we all have like very we might have liked overlapping skills. Then we're looking to ask somebody the team. Sometimes we're trying to find people that have like different powers, right? Your

uniting your hero team and you're trying to get people in the room that are going to empower. You were built upon your skills. And so like when I see somebody that has a portfolio it's like you know, I'm I'm really visually focused. I actually liked to Tinker around with my code projects and so they went off to the profile. I think that's amazing. And you hit the road, just focus on user experience. Most the time and the date. I'm showing that range that pulled Gana of things that they can do or different ways. Their brain works is really valuable. I'm so just I think that that's my

biggest, a piece of advice is like, figure out the vision you want to, you want to talk about for yourself, you know, what were you trying to portray when you come into this interview and What Makes You unique and stand out everybody's unique? So try to embrace that. Call Chandler, Todd any thoughts. If you can, if you can take that like a portfolio piece entire back to like how you improve their Core Business value metric or something. That's that's a really strong and compelling story to tell. If you're you're saying, you know, we mean on This

research is like, I know you can do research design but at the end of the day, we all work for companies and we have to deliver on a core customer value, whether that's a success metric of happiness or could be a bottom dollar line. Know you can you increase sales by this month? That's awesome. Compelling story to tell when you're in better than a project, trying to make sure you're close to the people that do data and run those numbers. Because, you know, your PMS relief, project success, you should be two in Saving as a way for your portfolio for later cuz I make great itches.

Entertain thoughts on that agree with that, and it's something that I'm trying to do. Be better about to is having to stay to say it like yes, this is Sid the Sid. Well, based on previous year, the, whatever the case may be because people do want to see that what you're doing can drive. It doesn't impact make improvements. Even if it's just like we texted something and it didn't work but we tried it and you can speak to that that's really important. And Courtney is making me feel a little guilty. I don't know if I have a vision for myself now,

but plus wonder what everybody else has said. I'm a big fan of just like I like I feel like when we were hiring and we're looking at people's websites in Portville, is I feel like case things are case, studies are kind of table Stakes at this point, but I'm a fan of just really good story. Like, if you're a good Storyteller, if you can present, you know, if you know, if you can either do that online, like, in in, on your website, or in an interview, you know, like set the stage, make me feel, the problem that existed before and and show me

how you helped solve this. Cuz you know, a lot of us, a lot of us can do good design work, but if we can't sell that car, then it just sits on somebody's computer as a picture that's not being used. Nice. And I saw the chat deal and ask what everybody super powers are shaming. Hornets that? You can away in there. But you telling me that if you don't mind sharing your superpowers and then I'll be awesome. Not running away from HTML, email design. So let's let's get into the mechanics of working out, a design team these days, especially, as more of us are working remotely.

So I'd love to kind of go into you. No kind of day-to-day stuff for your role in your team and even talked a little bit about what tools. Do you use to communicate with your teammates kind of document projects and collaborate on design? Maybe we'll go back with words this time side, if you want to take things off. So we're just listen some tools and some processes that we okay. Well, as far as designed to land goes, our team is all in on Sigma. We just love the document model and how it like Fitness a great tool for designers to use sketches. Great. Will do vxdas

grade school? Photoshop is a good tool, but the thing that separates figment for us, is that what it does, for the non-designers? How you can just invite somebody in, how you can send them a link, like Courtney said, you can make up presentation. It's that extension that kind of invite everybody into the design process. And that's, I think what we really love about it. So, we're all in figma. Let's see, what else do we use? We used jira, which I actually have avoided using jirah up until last. If you can believe that, but you like, the tools

that we used to, to organize ourselves are in anything, out of the ordinary, don't think we use slack. We use video chat, or you already went over Sigma. We have most of our code and get Hub. We have our design system that's running in a static site generator. And yeah we just try to document things as much as possible as far as just like making decisions. So that way, you know, if they lie cuz there's no hallway chatter you, miss all that if somebody isn't invited to the meeting or maybe they're in a different time zone and I couldn't make the meeting,

you know, documenting the things that goes on in that may be recording the meetings, you know, make sure that major decisions are made at appropriate times and with appropriate amount of visibility I'm trying to what side you're going to like that documentation work, a little look like, except except for starting to work remotely in a lot of people work remotely because of covid-19, careful just to document important meeting. But it's just recording it. Or

place is really important. I don't know if anyone's head of run into this where if you're like the only remote person and is it in person meeting and you're left out, but you can't fight your fault that your remote or whatever. Just making sure the information is there for everyone. Right now, I think we're sort of switching between a few different things. I think work van is our job tracking system used several different ones, route freelancing, another job. Honestly, I think it's whatever works for your company or your team, or your organization on his lot of good options out

there which is really, really cool. Be back. It's a little bit mean you'll back and forth with no baby. It's a, a message on jabber or to email but most for the most part I can start. If I'm pretty much already done it and put in charge template and it's pretty much good to go which is pretty nice. Courtney Rupp. Yes, I will say that one of the disadvantage be moving to Microsoft was not have to use their text back for a lot of stuff I got to use Excel. I was like Google

docs on the way for like 10 years and SharePoint Master. Now I'm sorry. SharePoint using using my dear, I can't do it. So I mean I spend the majority of my day and we're talk. We're docked in big, big madoc's and we use GitHub. So all of our code is is on and then a devops with a product management team uses for. I'm just managing through on the project, some kind of tracking things but personally I vs code is my go-to code editor and then I use notion a lot and I got to love notion right now.

It's kind of replace note for me as far as personal note taking the tagging engine Is Awesome on it and then I'll act like there's several great communities out there with people that are way more knowledgeable than me in certain areas and I try to join those communities and hit people up. Ask questions. I don't know how my brain works better when I can talk with somebody versus like asking and waiting for a response and then we use teams for all communication. So, chat and video.

The song I Think You Are. Last one here. Yep, I think that's it. I mean recently transitioned to a remote, it's been over the last couple of months. Some of the things that have survived well in when we up all upload ourselves is like, our design process has been like really helpful just getting everybody real time into it. And not really having to think about Persians came to share things fairly quickly. It has realistically not materially impacted our a process leading to create a top-loading. The credits to the internet has been a little Rocky and

moderation, but like, once you get a hang of moderating those, it's fairly straightforward. It was well, what has initially become a problem for us is dismissed desire to stay synced up on decisions. So, this is a fairly fast. Moving company move a little faster than the A company of a thousand people has the right to and as a result everybody's trying to like figure out what's going on at all times. It's a lot of that is sort of like casual conversation with your coworkers. You don't get to do that anymore. Initially, I think what happened

is everybody was throwing calendar. Invites on, everybody's calendar and kind of like just catch up in real life and I think it's really worth pressed. It aggressively move things into slack in like maybe you can do something in a one-on-one p.m. with somebody but like if you can also do it and then Channel you just do it until like aggressively. The channel has been helpful for us and like really asking the question at most meetings do we really need a meeting or do we? Can we do this a stink even having the question has been really helpful for us to a place where we do

far more a sync via documentation and the slack than we used to. And like the cat meeting load has reduced to make a reasonable level. That's kind of what we were. I work for us. So aggressive Channel. You said, decisions via documents and Yeah, it looks like every kind of all on board with big mama and I also love. Techman it something where can I using more more limits as well, for a kind of all the aforementioned to Horizons amazing product. They have to contend with his, which

everyone here has got to mention it to you. Don't have those conversations. You don't have those team launches anymore so there can be a lot of that that just kind of General morale. And that being friends for a little bit as we all get used to this new remote world. I, how do I love you manage keeping team morale up and still building those more human relationships with your teammates? I even if you're not doing it in person, Anybody can drop in here. We've been doing these spend a lot of controversy blind Contour sketches like on Fridays will have like

some people can bring whatever they want to drink and it's just like a 30-minute call and we challenged each other to do like blind contour drawings of coworkers. So we do these funny little bikes catches. You had to close your eyes and pretend I'm visualizing Jason right now enjoying him. It's a moment in time to talk and see how unwind after the week. Remember we we had a bunch of those fun meetings and I've taken that from from my old company as well. We're like you have like a weekly stand up and like their, you can stand up like I was boring, rudest goes around

and talks, but we try to do is leave like the last half of the meeting and we rotate the responsibility where everybody can do like a team building activity, like the 1/4 just mention like the, the the sense of sketch, I think it's called, if you are a cranium board game, we've done Mad Libs. What else do we do? Just last week, I did went with my team or it was two truths and a lie, where everybody tries to guess like with the liars and it always leads to good. Good discussion. Good, good. Just laughing together,

but they're just like so many ways that you can stretch video chat to to make it almost feel like you're together but you know, I wasn't sure a lot of us are thinking like it's also good to actually be together every once in awhile to so you know, things like meetups are nice. Post-pandemic hopefully I will see him at turns out. But yeah I'm just trying to think what else we also have just like a Random slack channels for non-work things like like sports or rock climbing or whatever. And then I've

noticed a dial pad as well, folks are in the company of just started to post like these optional like meetings and it's forever. It's at all like non-work things like one one fella here, does yoga feels like a yoga 30-minute yoga thing. I want another person, I host storytime for like little kids, so I can look for in the afternoon and I'm sitting with my four-year-old in my lap and we're doing reading a children's book, over over video chat, a little things like that in to break up the day. So it's about to start work. Work work.

I like that one thing again. We had our all-hands a couple of weeks ago up with my son. Have a super run, all in-person. We had like family talent shows Mario Kart fandom inside just going to ride fun stuff like that. So I fully support adding adding adding a bad in there. An animal crossing flag shanawar. Real hosts are Bella, turn up prices for for the day so we can get the most bang for buck. R r y in Animal Crossing skyrockets, morale up and what are you feeling like part of a team?

If you work all the time, you don't have to think about more. And I'm kidding particularly good at this. I think it's like because I think we don't have a long history of working remote. The first order of business is to make sure nothing is on fire from like work perspective and then we're kind of just like there and like, okay. Well we know how to work with each other. Now we're both late. And now we're trying to figure out how to be like humans of each other which is this still a process that we're learning by. We do we do the

occasional jackbox? We do the two shoes in the life too and we have all these social channels but it's honestly and it's in the word definitely working on. Is it just does not feel the same? Maybe that's a good definition fixation. Do you have when you start being a in-office company? If I supposed to like when you start with like a fully remote company but it just doesn't feel the same yet. I'm a little bit worried in the long run for the word. That means for people with the class of people who came in for remote race of the people who had in office

culture and like the gulf between these people. So I don't know. I feel like that's that's an important Point, even not even just between people that were might, have been in the office beforehand and then like fully remote. Now by there from like startup world to, you know, much larger company is is there anyway. You all like any tactics or getting your team members feel like part of the team Beyond just like you know what, having fun video calls and stuff like

that. How do you make sure that your new team members and people that are part of this newer class joining your company? Feel like they're part of the company, I feel like they can contribute more comfortable, you know, giving feedback on the participating in all those conversations that other teammates might be thinking about it. Read me the story. I have one circle thing about the version of two truths and a lie with a team. When somebody trying to said, we don't tell people which one is the lie and we have to kind of figure out

in that one-on-one subsequently. I was going to say that. I'm even though I joined my current haven't even spent a little over a year ago. I am the last fire to my team, and I want think that's how I made the transition from the office to Portsmouth remote team was just a little thing, just like a, for a team meeting for testicle weekly. At the time, it is that he can't have your vehicle. My co-workers, I've never met them in real life yet. Probably, you might be a while

because of covid-19 ever felt like that they weren't there for me and maybe that's more of a company culture expectation type thing. But if something were to happen, I could message them. They have my phone number for somewhere to happen and its overall I feel supported or unsupported even though their way Corn are tied to you either, be having any thoughts on this? I may be especially both being from stack, Overflow and working together was there. I know you guys I have gone through some growth in special last

couple years. How do you make it? So that new team members felt like they're part of the team? Yeah, I think just a lot of the normal things that you would do in an office setting like saying a meeting if it's like a big meeting and everyone's going around in critique or stand up or whatever. Just inviting the new people to give them space to talk and contribute you got stuff to do with a new person but it's even tougher to do as a new person over video chat. When you know, you don't know the team that well you don't know. The nuances. Is this a good time to talk? I don't know if I'm

interrupting you. There's a slight lag. So just giving them the space to to speak up. Same thing with with chat like if there's like a culture and giving giving them good first projects, that's something that we're going through right now since myself and 1/2 folks. Dial pad are still relatively new just Finding appropriate projects for them to learn and you know make mistakes and learn from those mistakes and feel like you know I am in fact still doing a good job.

I am the person and you hired me for a reason. Nice. I like all that would buy it. I know we're getting close to time here in about 9 minutes late. So we could shut off here. So I had a couple of questions, but didn't want to find anybody. If you have any questions that I asked you, I asked any of us here. I'm just do that in that stage chat with whatever. People wanted to do you what you expect design to change significant significantly with that moved her about it looks like wrong, using more Clapper, tools, like Big Mama by it. How do you think this

focus on the real work is going to change our tools are process than 13 structures moving forward? Maybe Courtney, I haven't heard from you in a minute. If you want to take a stab at it. I think this is kind of metal, but you're going to see, like, a lot of these companies that were kind of hesitant or resistant to it, they're going to have to, like, do a guest check-in, stay like, is this for us or not? And, you know, part of that, you open yourself up to a lot more Talent. So I don't know that like design in and of itself is not the

work of design, probably won't change, but like the teams will change and be on the time zones, you know, that's always a hurdle that all companies have to overcome and how, how do you set expectations for managers to? You know, monitor their employees and make sure that things are getting done on time. I mean it it kind of introduces this whole. Like I think that we've seen some companies don't you go that way? I'd like they want to have like a Ultra surveillance on employees with more companies going remotes can actually create more choice for

designers so it's honestly Better World to move towards in my opinion to have. Opengl drivers iron. Google opens up jobs to everybody. I mean, I don't want to take a job in San Francisco right now, I don't want to move there so I don't, I just anytime it's like, it's not going to look at it. So yeah, I just, I think it's great for everybody and I think that we're just going to see more maturity in the design field. You going to see a lot more like less homogeneous products, probably because you're going to get a more diverse world.

Do you going into it? You going to have somebody from Poland, you going to have somebody from Japan working on projects or just all San Francisco opens at the end of the Genie. Genie lamp right. Traditional teams. Like that Shannon you were nodding life-giving take on this. yeah, I don't remember which point but Yeah, I agree with like the diverse. Like, if you're open to remote, there is a greater pool of possible candidates in competition, but I think that's really interesting to see what could come of that. Yeah, I don't think the work of design itself will change

in the future. I think it was interesting. I just want to build on something that Courtney said a minute ago, so like most companies are all companies are were forced to go remote really quickly and you know, I think it's really interesting right now. We're seeing Courtney describes an inflection point, where you'll see these companies, some of them will just take their office culture and just try to jam it into remote, right? So like, everything's a meeting everything has

to be real time. You have to be at your seat between 9 and 5 like that sort of thing and then but then you know, there'll be other companies that that say, like, okay, well just get your work done or we're going to lean more until I get a synchronous side of remote working. It's, it'll be interesting to see like, which way companies, go is already starting to see, you know, some, some companies that were traditionally office space ones like already, you know, see the benefits and see the And and say things like well, even when this whole thing is over, if it's ever over, you don't have to

come back to the office anymore. Nice to know, we're really close on time. I did see, I like a squash in what specialization within design. Do you see becoming most critical in the future? I Batman one more time, so maybe it will start an original order of mine. Yeah, I have a take on this. I think we're probably going to see the unbundling of the product design, like job and I think we're going to see more and more generally, a little cheaper to build for most companies, and I think we'd better tooling better systems and better at

libraries and just better Primitives. The work of slate visual design and putting you ice together become less and less. A part of a many designers jobs that I guess just kind of like plug-and-play. And there's no really need for you to innovate on the inner side unless you're doing it on a systematic level. So I think you dare you're going to see far more people specialize in Design Systems. I think the consequence of that is. Probably a lot of people do today as part of the sign that really just becomes like Advocating for user needs and put a blanket

deciding. What on what the product experiences that like services using these and like, some of this will mean putting together a you. I'm a lot of cars will be like what is the right thing to do for our users and like it will be a much more abstract and Mike were driven conversation as opposed to a screenshot of a conversation because the screen is going to build itself. When you have two words, I think a lot of Prada designer to probably going to leave in a little bit closer to PMs. And I also think that given that more and more companies going to have systems, these systems are, probably

all going to be built in somewhat similar ways. Like, I don't expect there to be, like, marginal, like business value and like you, I differentiation. So I expect a lot of the design differentiation to move to program. So, like, there was that stuff that you're seeing cash out to the stuff that you're seeing, like, a lot of these companies are known for Grand Tree to do some of it. In the you I bet a lot of a lot of it is under Twitter. A lot of it is on there like I think Brenda Zion is going to be like, pretty wild in the future and I'm excited for a world like that is like a separate

discipline entirely from Nice. Hi Courtney. Real quick. What kind of specialization are you thinking is going to take old? I think they were seeing a lot more like mature, like artificial intelligence and machine learning being integrated into the products are working on and it's taking away like you Tom said, we're not going to focus so much on the screen record, me focused on the results of an accident user performed in some form of interphase and that's not always going to be at screens. Going to be

talking, going to be me saying something, maybe it's even in a different language and it's translated. So like, there's just so much complexity around like Understanding Psychology and how these systems work together and like, there has to be somebody that owns that on these products. The more they get integrated into the daily products, the more kind of spread out among General product, designers Spectrum, right? Right now, we're seeing your kind of Miss products, but it's going to grow. Yeah, I think I'm eating said it really well about advocating for the needs of the user of the user's

needs that I think that like 100% 1000 %, that's where the future needs to go. We all know it is important to this. After thought I'm thinking just for like use the information Eevee possible for people to digest, this is for me, coming for working. In like, healthcare Financial, it is like a lot of data is very overwhelming. I would hope to see that as designers and developers, he can be better about the stealing that information that is more acceptable to everyone. Take us home. Yeah, I'm just going to take what everybody else said and bundled up and call it my own. You know,

I think I agree with what you talking, sad about how I like it. We don't need to reinvent the same Wheels over and over again. So I think systematizing all that, at the same time, there's a lot of other things that need to be fixed in that system though. And extended to like, we've all seen the terrible things that machine learning can do, went to slap to its own devices. So making sure that there's a human in that Loop and making sure that things are inclusive accessible. I'm doing things for the boys, doing things with her.

Make sure that the machine doesn't do what it's not supposed to do. And I also think that ux research is always going to have a home here because I don't know what William, I guess computers could have evolved to take a dealer on ux Research. But that would be a little creepy. Awesome. So I'm going to pop off here in Lawrence going to pop back on and wrap everything up. But thank you. Thank you and Courtney Shannon sad. I really appreciate that. A lot of fun with you guys. So sometime soon.

Cackle comments for the website

Buy this talk

Access to the talk “How Remote Design Teams Collaborate & Hire | Arc.dev Remote Career Summit”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Ticket

Get access to all videos “Remote Career Summit 2020”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Ticket

Interested in topic “Human Resources Management”?

You might be interested in videos from this event

June 4, 2020
Online, London
7
420
diversity, employing , in-house, inclusion, inclusion strategy, online business conferences, online conferences, online events, recruiting

Similar talks

Vinayak Ranade
CEO at Drafted at Drafted
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Caro Griffin
Director of Operations at Skillcrush
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Andrew Gobran
People Operations Generalist at Doist
+ 2 speakers
Laïla von Alvensleben
Head of Culture & Collaboration at MURAL
+ 2 speakers
Sacha Connor
Founder and CEO at Virtual Work Insider
+ 2 speakers
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Buy this video

Video
Access to the talk “How Remote Design Teams Collaborate & Hire | Arc.dev Remote Career Summit”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Conference Cast

With ConferenceCast.tv, you get access to our library of the world's best conference talks.

Conference Cast
946 conferences
37592 speakers
14370 hours of content