Events Add an event Speakers Talks Collections
 
Shanis Windland
Vice President Human Resources at VMware
  • Video
  • Table of contents
  • Video
Women Transforming Technology (WT2) 2020
May 5, 2020, Online, USA
Women Transforming Technology (WT2) 2020
Request Q&A
Request Q&A
Video
Shanis Windland, VMware | Women Transforming Technology
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Add to favorites
94
I like 0
I dislike 0
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
  • Description
  • Transcript
  • Discussion

About the talk

Empathy becomes an unexpected essential for pandemic business survival

It’s easy to dismiss the effects of the pandemic on tech workers who established telecommute routines prior to the pandemic. But working under COVID-19 isn’t normal working from home.

“This is working from home, not having help, dealing with homeschooling, still trying to succeed at work, and a variety of other things,” Shanis Windland said.

It is important for managers to have empathy and offer support for workers feeling burned out or disengaged due to COVID-19-related stress, according to Windland.

“VMware announced pandemic leaves for all of their employees to allow exactly that. If you need to take a break, take a break. No questions asked,” she said.

The company is also sponsoring activities that foster connection and offer a diversion from the stress of daily life. These include virtual coffee meet-ups and parties. “We did a sort of variety show as an all-hands and had 20,000 employees calling in to it,” Windland said.

Like Sutter, she sees the change becoming a permanent, and positive, part of the company’s structure. “It’s been this huge impetus to grab onto this as an opportunity to build the future of the company to tap into new talent pools and to really embrace how and where our employees want to work,”she said.

License Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed)

00:20 Introduction of Shanis Windland

01:20 About the WT2 event

02:52 How did this pivot happen?

04:00 You are the VP of Diversity and Inclusion, what are some of the changes?

06:23 About the pivot or evolution into diversity and inclusion

07:20 The culture at VMware

09:00 The recommendations for those who aren't used to working from home

10:18 WT2 number five

12:50 Being a financial expert

13:00 Understanding data and numbers

14:26 Closing remarks

About speaker

Shanis Windland
Vice President Human Resources at VMware

Blending my business background with my dedication to DEI Financial and operations executive with 20+ years of experience. Established and managed financial activities in high growth, entrepreneurial environments. Extensive leadership and experience in finance, accounting, tax, corporate IT, and operations. Key business advisor to the CEO and executive management team. Passionate about business operations and results. Specialties: Creating and scaling highly functional teams Extensive planning and analysis Implementation of accounting and business systems Process Implementation & Management Fundraising Successful private exits International experience Contract review and negotiation

View the profile
Share

From around the globe. It's the cue with digital coverage of women, transforming technology. Brought to you by VMware. Hi, this is Lisa Martin, covering the 5th. Annual, women, transforming technology. Vmware's, wonderful event. First year though. Wp2 is digital. So I'm coming to you remotely from my home, in San Jose and very pleased to welcome. The VP of diversity and inclusion from VMware, Janice, when lunch and a spoken to the cube. Thank you. It's great to be here. Wt-2 is one of my favorite event. I have had the

opportunity to do lie and cover it for the cube. The last couple of years. And it is truly one of those events where you walk in. And it's part of that beautiful quad Outdoors at in the Colorado campus that you feel this, very large sense of community. And it's so positive, but it's overwhelming and how genuine, I can't imagine a challenging. It was to have to make the decision not too long ago, to have to convert that to digital, but I can also imagine that that community. Wt2. Getting women everywhere to go. Absolutely no matter where

I am here. Let me a little bit about that and what some of the things were, we surprised you about the event the other day. Yeah, so I think we were watching, obviously the news and we decided a probably a little bit earlier than other conferences did and make the move to Virtual so that we could really spend the time to really plan it and make it special. So I'm so pleased with how the event turned out. As, you know, it's usually a smaller events of 500-550 women in person. And this year we were able to have over 5,000 attendees which is fantastic.

And I still felt this amazing energy from the conference, you know, that that was going and people were super positive and cheering each other on and giving each other advice and talking about with the speakers were talking about him. It was an incredible experience. I was so surprised and energized by Max press conference. So happy I was able to attend 5000 is remarkable should have blew your expectations and the number of of your speakers that I have spoken to about this event of all talk about how interactive every session was with hundreds of women, logged into each session.

Is that speaks to the community and reputation that wp2 has built over the last five years to tell me a little bit about how this pit. It happened with the theme. We rise very poignant and and so important in this very uncertain if I'm at that were and talk to me about the importance and a development of that seem to really help from everybody being all over the world. Yeah, I mean we talked about the theme a long time ago and develop it at your, with the collection of companies. The Consortium that we worked on in, in

planning the conference. And it is so relevant to what's happening. Right now, the experience of not only women but people everywhere feeling isolated and the need for connection and the need to feel like you can still succeed if we win at work. And it was just so amazing. And one of my favorite pieces was when Laura Dern was actually quoting the Maya Angelou poem about Rising. It was so incredibly powerful and just really wrapped up the day in an amazing way with that Eamon. I know I personally walked away feeling energized and feeling like, yes, we can do

this, we can continue to rise regardless of the situation. You tell me you. You are the VP of diversity and inclusion. What are some of the changes that you're or the evolution of that role? Even in the last two months of this can end up knowing every single person from Pat gelsinger all the way down. Everybody across, the globe is really emotionally challenged right now as well as potentially you have impacted financially. Yeah, I think it's just been super important to talk about empathy and Leadership and supporting our employees. And I think it's truly given leader than managers and

employees, a totally different perspective on what that means right now, and it being where I felt so much empathy from our leadership and so much empathy from our managers. And just in terms of understanding employee experience. This isn't normal working from home for anybody. This is working from home, not having help dealing with its homeschooling, still trying to succeed at work and a variety of other things that people have six family members, worried about the world and work. And I think it's just really really important for leaders continued to check in and connect with their

employees. Empathy is so important and I'm glad that you mention that. Because when we only talked to the c-suite executives, I was talking to some of the other speakers earlier this morning, who, who helped develop women to be in leadership positions. And instead of asking, you know, what are some of the characteristics that you and identify this person is on the c-suite path. I always want to understand what are the hard and soft feels really should. But it's something now that I think is not only is important. It's also

contagious. If you see that from a leader, I think that the impact to protiviti and be huge know that's so true. And I think that employees regardless of their working environment still really want to succeed at work. They still want to feel like they can have a career and move forward and it and they still want to support their companies in succeeding and it's so important that they feel like regardless of their fur. Do a snake do. One of the things that I saw Laura Dern mentioned in her

closing keynote was about, you know, you don't have to stay in your swim Lane and I was looking at your background that you're in a financial exact about your event or Evolution into diversity and inclusion. It was a surprising turn for me as well. As you know, I spent my entire career doing Finance but coming to VMware. It was really for me an opportunity to participate and and building the company where I wanted to continue to work. And I, I really took my business background in building companies in building cultures and applying it to

this role. I think diversity and inclusion succeeds when it's really felt by every single employee, every single day. And in a global company like VMware, the only way that works is if each and every employee and manager and Brace that. So they look around and I see people like them succeeding and they feel like they can have the best for your possible at VMware. And when I approach this role, that's how I think about applying it to VMware. Tell me about the culture at VMware before this Ted and how has it evolved in just the last eight weeks knowing well knowing there's a lot of

uncertainty and probably assuming we're going to be working from home for a while. What is not overall spirit is already having quite a number of distributed employees, but still kind of an office Central culture and we were working on an initiative to move that faster in our executives are calling it faster to the future. Or we're really embracing this distributed working model at moving forward, as been huge, impetus to grab onto. This is an opportunity to build the future of the company to tap into new Talent pools and to really Embrace. How and where are my boys,

want to work, and give them the choice on how, and where they want to work? One of the things do I work from home? A lot when I'm not traveling. So, there's a balance. And I saw it when I go to work and help with, this is a very different situation, a lot of folks and talking to are all acknowledged in the same, emotional concerns or waking up one day and I don't feel very motivated today. But also some of the things I'm hearing are same storm and acknowledging that is really critical because if that's also a

an authentic way of communicating and let you know that your thoughts about the fact that we're all using zoom and we have included Technologies. VMware have a lot of technology to enable remote were coarse connection and thought. What are some of your recommendations for maybe folks who aren't used to working from home? How can they express? Feel the puppets to express their thoughts in their concerns? Or maybe I do. If they have that, this is bringing up. Well, I think your butt or so. All they have to feel like the company's actually

supporting that. So, you know, to your point about feeling burned out, or just not feeling like they're able to engage VMware announce pandemic leave for all of their employees to allow exactly. If you need to take a break, take a break, no questions asked, and everyone's dealing with a lot of different things. So I think that's important. And then I think that managers and leaders and employees can just be connection across company. We've seen so many things at VMware virtual coffees parties. We did a sort of variety show as an all-hands and had

20,000 employees calling into it. Just amazing ways for people to feel like they can still connect with the company and feel part of the community, but I think we also have to be empathetic to a zumba Teague at which is great technology. But trying to be on video all the time and on and be difficult for people. And so really just staying in touch with people and being honest. Where we are, I think it's really important for everybody. The WGT number 5 first time virtual but huge massive amounts of people five thousand or so as you look forward,

you know, we know the world huge event and never many years is going to be digital this year. So we're also kind of anticipating. We're not going to have these in person events for who knows. Maybe it's a year or more. Are you already looking out W-2? The 6th annual knowing we can do this virtually, but what are your thoughts and looking forward on the sent the community sense that you saw and felt the other day. Yeah, so I think there was so much special about the in-person event. You mention this, at the beginning, this smaller group of women, able to connect

and really build back in person community made the event so special, yet. It was so incredibly successful, you know, as a virtual event as an example sitting and just watching Laura Dern and Catherine Finney. 121 essentially was an amazing experience for me. It felt like I was there with them just having a conversation which was so cool. And so I think we're really considering how we can continue to have that virtual community but offer that in person. But I don't entirely figured that out but it's definitely something top of mind for us that participation that broad Community continuing to

build battle. The inclusion piece of just struck me when you were talking about, you know, everybody on us. A lot them comments on Twitter. Everybody, loved me, and Laura Dern it. But one of the things I find comforting in this time, is doing this job from my home office in San Jose, but even watching the local news, or the national news, in the same storm. There is a sense of I would say inclusion and that that thing, you know, Oscar winner, Laura Dern at her home. Just sort of always have

levels the playing field, but it's it's a connection point that you probably wouldn't have had with her and things been like they were last year. Totally, you know, and just the opportunity to chat with her actually and feel like. Yeah, it's very, very connected because we're just right next to each other, even though we really weren't. It is truly special and does make you feel. And remember that everyone is in the same boat. So, one thing that I'm thinking about with your background, being a financial expert, is that helpful to you and your role of it? Cuz there's so much Financial

uncertainty right now, right. Negative of a different basis by which to help evolve the diversity and inclusion program at Via more understanding, that employees, are had concerns about finances and some concerns about finances. Tell me little bit about that experience that you have and this new role and how maybe in the spirit that relation there, dump telling together. Yeah. I think it's really around being metrics for then and ensuring that were using data to inform decisions about programs rebuild and how we talked to leaders and seen that my

finance background and really understanding data. And numbers has helped me in this role at tremendously. And I think you're right. If, you know, people are struggling with finances, maybe their spouses have lost their job, or their parents have lost their job. And again, Really just comes back to you empathy and understanding what people are experiencing and ensuring that we open the door for them to be able to talk about it and bring that to work and be okay with it. And even the governor of California Gavin, Newsom has been talking for weeks about making data-driven decisions and

attacking hurting me just like to pretend that. I know that is not understand that, right? Because of the economic and some of the toll but having that I guess, pragmatic, side that I would say injunction, but that empathy of the pretty good. Actually, I am very pragmatic. What song is it's been a pleasure having you on the program? Thank you so much. I'm so pleased to hear how it was successful. The event was I'm not at all surprised, but it's great to hear that the sense of community and the energy was there in Spades. And a digital environment. Yes. I'm

so glad you were able to be there with us. Thank you so much. My pleasure has been watching the coverage of the digital. Women transforming technology event. We thank you for your time.

Cackle comments for the website

Buy this talk

Access to the talk “Shanis Windland, VMware | Women Transforming Technology”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Ticket

Get access to all videos “Women Transforming Technology (WT2) 2020”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Ticket

Interested in topic “IT & Technology”?

You might be interested in videos from this event

November 9 - 17, 2020
Online
50
94
future of ux, behavioral science, design engineering, design systems, design thinking process, new product, partnership, product design, the global experience summit 2020, ux research

Similar talks

Betsy Sutter
Executive Vice President and Chief People Officer at VMware
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Charmaine McClarie
President at McClarie Group
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Nataly Kogan
Founder at Happier @ Work
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Buy this video

Video
Access to the talk “Shanis Windland, VMware | Women Transforming Technology”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Conference Cast

With ConferenceCast.tv, you get access to our library of the world's best conference talks.

Conference Cast
949 conferences
37757 speakers
14408 hours of content