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Milken Institute Global Conference 2020
October 20, 2020, Online, USA
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Transforming K-12 Education in the Time of COVID-19 | Part 1 and 2
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About the talk

Topic: Finances

Transforming K-12 Education in the Time of COVID-19 | Part 1: A Conversation with US Department of Education Secretary Betsy DeVos | Part 2: A Conversation with Emerson Collective's Arne Duncan

Part 1:

Guest Betsy DeVos, Secretary, US Department of Education

Moderator Ian Rowe, Resident Fellow, AEI

Part 2:

Guest Arne Duncan, Managing Director, Emerson Collective; former Secretary, US Department of Education; Author, "How Schools Work"

Moderator Nina Rees, President and CEO, National Alliance for Public Charter Schools

About speakers

Betsy DeVos
Secretary at US Department of Education
Arne Duncan
Secretary of Education at U.S. Department of Education
Nina Rees
President and CEO at National Alliance for Public Charter Schools
Ian Rowe
Resident Fellow at AEI

Arne Duncan is the ninth U.S. secretary of education. He has served in this post since his confirmation by the U.S. Senate on Jan. 20, 2009, following his nomination by President Barack Obama. Duncan's tenure as secretary has been marked by a number of significant accomplishments on behalf of American students and teachers. He helped to secure congressional support for President Obama's investments in education, including the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act's $100 billion to fund 325,000 teaching jobs, increases in Pell grants, reform efforts such as Race to the Top and Investing in Innovation, and interventions in low-performing schools. In support of President Obama's goal for the United States to produce the highest percentage of college graduates by the year 2020, Duncan has helped secure increases in the Pell grant program to boost the number of young Americans attending college and receiving postsecondary degrees. He has begun new efforts to ensure that colleges and universities provide more transparency around graduation, job placement, and student loan default rates.

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Hello and welcome to transforming K to 12 education. In the time of covid-19. My name is Ian Rowe. I'm a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute. Am very excited to kick off a two-part, a conversation. The first part, I will be moderating a discussion with current Secretary of Education, Betsy DeVos. And then my colleague need a resend. The charter worlds will be moderating a discussion with former Secretary of Education Arne. Duncan. Welcome secretary to boss. Yeah. So, in addition, to being a

resident fellow at ATI for the last decade, I ran a network of public charter schools in the heart of the South Bronx in the Lower East Side of the 2,000 students, primarily low-income kids and like many educational leaders across the world. In March. We were thrust into a situation where we suck. Had to be remote learning for 2,000 kids, delivered phone, books, to kids homes. We set up Wi-Fi, hotspot. And housing project delivery for kids who are dependent on breakfast and lunch to apply to extraordinary few

months and now seven months later. And two months into the school year. There are still would seem to be thousands of school leaders still grappling with how to deliver a high-quality education, either remote or in person. What are you seeing? As you look at the landscape in the aftermath, or is she still in the duration of covid-19, and we know that for many students that final couple months of school was very difficult. And in fact, less than a quarter School.

Had any expectation of kids actually learning anything new after mid-march at through the summer months. We know that there was planning and discussion going on about reopening and ensuring that kids could begin their learning again. But what we're seeing right now is still, I need an uneven application of opportunity for students and we have parents who are unhappy with schools where their children aren't being permitted to go back to school and learning in person and others that are concerned about it and fearful of it. And we have districts that are not opening up at

all to in person learning and giving families, no choices and no options. And so it's been a very, very disruptive time. We know four families of frustrating time, a concerning time, but we are seeing a lot of bright spots as well. We're seeing a lot of a lot of families who have some sort of decided to take things into their own hands. And have started to homeschool Consortium with other families or a micro schools, or some of these little one-room schoolhouse type of approaches, but we know at the bottom line, there are too many kids, particularly the most

vulnerable, who are not having a full education experience, a full learning experience as of this fall and are still falling farther and farther behind. So, it is a real moment of Crisis and opportunity for education in America. Your Administration has put a lot of emphasis on the idea of getting kids back in school in person. And you may know the work of Emily. Oster. She's an economist at Brown University and she said, she created a national covid-19 dashboard

to measure. What has been the infection rate and Ian an independent basis? They surveyed Almost 1,300 schools, more than 200,000 students are in school in person. 66 64,000 teachers and staff. And they've come to the conclusion that school's despite all of the fears of, if we send back kids to quickly. That's cool that I should not be in any kind of virus, super spreader. In fact, for data, says something like points, one 3% 1 and 1000 students are being infected. How, how, how do you

process that information? Cuz most parents don't have a sense that that's what the actual infection rate has been right? Well, I think there's been a lot of latitude, and a lot of skating of facts for different ends in different agendas and the unfortunate saying, in all of this is that the children who aren't able to get back to school in person there. Learning is suffering as a result. And yeah, I think we're we're schools have been very intentional about engaging, their families talking very openly

about their plans to get kids back in school, to give families, who have concerns because of some health condition in their own family, the option of learning at a distance and then continuing to communicate with those families, about how to, how to mitigate a problem. If there is a diagnosis occurring in the school and I visited a number of them in Georgia and North Carolina and most recently in Phoenix and in Texas and they're in their people figuring this out and leaders that are doing what needs to be done

to ensure that kids can continue their learning. We have got to get through the part of here and get to a play. Taste of, in a posture of a will to ensure that all kids get back to learning because we know for for kids across the board. There are other health risk to not being back School, back to school and learning in person. There's social and emotional growth. And there's mental health risks. And that's not even to talk, then about the academic health and and lack of progress, that too many kids are experiencing now. Yeah, I mean you talk about the fear in New York

City than just tested. Again, more than 16,000 staff and students, and only came back with a about 28 of positive infection. So it does seem like the incident to her solo. What is he saying? Parents are fearful. What's the role of the Federal Government and actually creating a much more expansive database? What university is creating that you could as as the federal departments could actually build the level of confidence. So their parents could have trusted information. As I could make decisions about in-person instruction.

Well, I'm not sure there's a role for the Department of Education to compile and conduct that research but we know that the Center for Disease Control is continuing to compile all of the data and and we'll have you know, obviously a lot more to share as it continues to be compiled. The data is there for anybody who wants to to search for it and look for it. And we have broadly been talking about this. All of the coronavirus Task Force at the White House, has continued to speak about the necessity and the imperative for

kids to get back to school and back to learning and has been very forthcoming and citing the data and continuing to revise its as we know and learn more about how the virus behaves in and operate. Yeah, I mean, I just did an event last week with The Waltons foundation with three amazing parents on, who are very involved in their kids education. And in each of the three situations, their respective schools were offering in-person instruction, but all three chose not to have their kids go in school, one decided to home-school and two decided to stay remote because the

information they here, are are generally macro-level data around and infections Rising. They don't have a sense of what it is in school. So, how is it that? Average teachers are school districts, can get this information. Cuz right now, it doesn't appear that they have a level of confidence that they won't create a super spreader. A situation, if they invite more kids in school. Well, we know that state superintendent across the country are continuing to receive data for in about their states. They have been working. Many of them have been working proactively with their

districts to ensure that they have a very open and clear Communications those internally in the district and importantly with the school buildings and even before school was supposed to start up again, those those who have been very forward-leaning in their planning, for this has has put forward at a very comprehensive plan for steps to be taken. If and when they do have a virus occurrence and how to mitigate the the downstream impact of that for other students and other teachers within the school. So they're there is the

data there is the information. And those those leaders who are just really in signs to keep moving ahead, are they are the ones who are actually helping to leave their states or their District appropriately into and through this time. Some of these bright spots, you said that a lot of parents are taking matters into their own. Hands are creating pandemic pods for homeschooling. District-level. Can you lift up any examples where there has been districts? That have done a good job of balancing health risks with doing in person instruction. I think it's

important for people to be able to see and then demystify what the success is. Abby, the samples in the last couple of Forsyth County in Georgia, visited the school. They are, where 70% of their students were back in person in the high school, but about 30% were electing to learn at a distance, or do a blended approach where they would, some of the students would come in for their Labs or other, you know, Hands-On and More in in person, required a subject and they let you know that. Leadership there from the superintendent down to the school. Building leaders have been

continually income in communication. Not only with themselves, but importantly, with all of the families there serving to ensure that everyone has continued updated information. And they've been successfully navigating that I also visit School in New Hampshire, a couple of weeks ago. Where in fact I I was supposed to visit two of the school's, one of the school ended up having a case diagnose the night before. And we just pivoted and visited only one of them because they went through the measures that they had previously

agreed-upon. And again, they were very much moving forward with kids there in person some of their students and some of their families had elected to stay learning at a distance, but they reported also that more and more of the families wanted to Have their kids back in person as that, you know, the weeks began to compile with success and with evidence that this could, this could be successful for those who were concerned about their kids being there from the start several School. District leaders have said, part of the challenge that they've had is

not having the access to have sufficient personal protective equipment or other measures to create a safe environment, where do things stand is as far as Federal resources. I know there's several bills that have been pursued in the house in the Senate. What's the timeline that leaders can think about knowing that funds could be coming for this purpose? Well, let's go. Let's start with the cares. Act. That was passed, 90 some days ago and which we ensured got distributed appropriately to the states in less than 30 days. There were almost 13. There was 13

billion dollars. That was the appropriated for K-12 education and of that amount that was distributed to the state. The last I checked, which was just a few days ago, only 11% of that 12 that 12 billion cuz it was part of, it was designated elsewhere. But only 11% of that had actually been drawn down and utilized. So there are resources there and I just charged and encourage All State leaders and nle gay leaders to really work with your state leadership to ensure that you're getting the resources

needed. There should be no no other than than Yeah, that it hit. We we were very prompt with getting the money distributed. And and so it it really is an opportunity for states to ensure that every there is no reason that there shouldn't be ppen, an appropriate, you know, cleanliness items available for the schools before we make a pivot, you know, one of the things as you just said, there's a lot of innovation happening as a result of covid-19 will remote learning become more integrated into the Traditional School System. What do you think?

Are those things that will continue even after covid-19, one day is no longer with us. Well, I think it remains to be seen what exactly will continue. But I am very optimistic that we're going to have a lot more Innovation and creativity and how we approach K-12 the K-12 experience. And and I believe that's because more more than ever today. Parents are aware of how their children learn what they've been learning and whether they're happy and pleased with the with what they have been with their,

with their school environment, it as it has been. And as more families get experience with Alternatives. I think more of those alternatives are going to really take root and and we're going to see a lot more options and opportunities, which is all the more reason why we need to advance policies both at the state and federal level that are going to empower families with the resources to choose those. Options for their kids. Does school choice. The support for school choice has continued to grow dramatically and I think it's going to continue as more parents

realize that their children can and will do better in a different situation than they were prior pandemic. Prior to the pandemic. It is true. That someday covid will be Beyond us and I end and I know that you are big Champion, school choice and as I someone who runs Charter Schools you do in New York City. There's a wait list of fifty thousand families that are desperate to just get a great education for their kid, but we will one day be past covid covid. And we'll be going back to Napoleon, quote

normal, but the truth is a normal wasn't so great. For many kids of all Races is that there's actually a chart that I'd like to display. So, please, if so this. So for the Outside the United States, Navy National assessment of educational progress, is what we call the nation's report card every two years. We assess students, the grades for eight and 12 in reading and math. What kind of progress are we making? So this chart represents reading proficiency rates for 8th, graders from 1992 to

2019. And what is chart represents the the serve orange line is black students and you can see it's a pretty low force. And this is a percent of students who achieve Proficiency in Reading Readiness grade and four white students, its range is from 35 to 42. And so you can see that there's a persistent gap which is what we are offering to talk about the racial achievement gap between black and white. What type of even more interest is the fact that since 1992. There's never been a situation in which I'm a majority of even white students are reading at proficiency. So, That's

not due to systemic racism, right to sex. What is it that we can't solve problems unless we have a good hypothesis of what the real issue is? What I think it is eating for white students. There has been such a historical under performance, which sometimes gets overshadowed by the size of the racial achievement Gap. And it's a really good question. And I would posit that if, if resources both at the state and federal level where the issue, there's at least one or more states, that would have figured it out by now, and it is concerning

when more than half. The population is not able to read at grade level and the chart that you put up. The eighth grade results is is even more optimistic than the 12th grade results. So, you know, we've spent over a trillion dollars at the federal level alone since the Department of Education has existed with the express purpose of closing, the achievement Gap and not only have we not seen it close at all. We've seen it open in many of the measures and many of the cases. And in fact at the 12th grade level reading levels for black students between 1992 and

this most recent Nate have actually decreased and so My question more, broadly to those who would continue to defend the system that we have operated under for decades at with just the request for more resources is, how can you expect to achieve any different result by continuing to do the same thing with more resources? We we need to do something radically different and that's why I believe in empowering the families, particularly those who are not currently empowered to make decisions today

with those resources to find me learning environment, that is going to unlock the key for their child, is going to make a difference. It's going to make a dramatic difference, but we won't know how much of a difference. It will make until we actually do it. Wow, now that's a powerful. Answer me. And then please show please put up the second chart but it is interesting. Such a focus on the racial achievement Gap. Looking at what even white students achieve, if we close the racial achievement Gap, what we will have achieved is mediocrity for everyone.

And so, we do need to have radically different approaches. So this chart shows up, as many people think that she was resources in the form of more per pupil spending. So this is from my home state of New York. And this shows again from 1970 through 2018, in 2019 dollars, the amount of money that has been spent per pupil. If you can see, it's gone from $7,800 to 23024 thousand dollars per student. And those lines 282-280-2265 Seasons before those are the Nate scores over since 2. 1003 through 2018. As you can see, it's pretty flat. So there is

not a correlation. If it's not that money doesn't matter. It's just that. There's definitely not a clear relationship between significantly increased financial resources and academic performance of kids. You can take down the chart. So when you look at it when you look at an analysis like this secretary the boss, what what does this yield for you? Well, again, I think it makes the case that if resources in spending we're going to make the difference. We certainly would see that in the results in New York and not only have we not seen it but arguably

the results are even even less impressive factoring in the the dramatic increase in spending. And so I go back to the fact that we have got to do something radically different and that radical difference means going after some of the most incalcitrant recalcitrant opponents to a change, and to really freeing and empowering those who are consuming, the customers, the students and their families to an allowing them to drive. What education looks like in a whole new way. And the creation of the New opportunities that

families are experiencing today because of the covid crisis. I think are helping to begin to point a lot of folks to the ways that this could happen and how this could look. And I, I think about a visit I had just last Friday and I'll last Thursday in Phoenix, where a governor Ducey. And I sat down with a number of parents and education leaders who are all of whom are exploring new areas, and new ways of educating their children. Given the circumstances they have right now. In Phoenix, we had we had

two or three micro School leaders and parent families represented. We had a couple of other moms who are in the process of forming. Some of these micro schools are learning pads and I think Parents in general, are going to really drive this change, but we have got to from a policy perspective, support them with the resources to do it. And I often referenced the picture and kids with their backpacks. Containing the resources that are dedicated to their education already anyway, and allowing them and their

families to take them to the learning environment. That's going to work for them. Absolute school choice, Secretary of Education. How can you influence the power of choice on a local level given that you don't necessarily have your Authority just to make that happen, right? And State Legislative leader on a state level to Advanced policy state-by-state and we've also advocated at the federal level President Trump in this Administration have advanced, the school choice. Which has been

sponsored in the Senate by Senator Tim Scott. It would create a tax credit pool at the federal level that states could decide to participate in or not. If they did, they would take these voluntary contributions made by taxpayers individuals or businesses, who could designate a small percentage of their federal tax bill in two organizations that will in turn grants scholarships to families as designated by the states that participate. So I like to talk about broadly think creatively about what this could look like. It

could be what we call education savings account. Going to families to choose to start up, or attend a micro school, or a learning pod, or to support homeschool expenses or to support the creation of some Career. And Technical education opportunities. Or in a rural area to access courses that they're there. A rule Public School can't offer because of its size and scale. That's so distinct. Really creatively about how this could Empower families to make the right choices for their kids based on their experience. Absolutely.

The United States has there been an issue. There's like a New York Times 1619 project and she's been really discredited and criticized by some of the nation's biggest historians are most historians, but there's a movement afoot to bring education into classrooms that says America's ideals or false when they were written. What's the danger of those kinds of ideas. Do you think about how to improve our overall education system? Well, we know we know for a fact that students today are really

ill prepared with their knowledge of history and Civics. And so I think fortuitous lay our conversation about, this are our Collective and a national conversation about learning and knowing and understanding history and Civics. And, you know, the foundations of our country. This is an important development and one that we are certainly going to continue to urge be further developed. We know that the state and local level is the place for these. These opportunities to really take Route because there is no place for the Federal Department

of Education, to establish a federal curriculum, that would would mandate one particular approach to teaching it, but we know that it is really fun to mantle that students begin to learn. Learn more about our nation's history and, and, and be prepared as good as good citizens at to be able to carry on. Got it. What? We only have 2 minutes left amazingly. What would you say? Enclosing is the single most important step that either a parent should take to dramatically improve the outcomes for your

kids as well as from a policy perspective. What's the single biggest lever for both on an individual basis, as well as from a government policy perspective. Well, for parents, I think it is being empowered with the resources for their children's, education to decide if they're assigned. School is where they want to be and where their child is Friday, terrific, but if it's not to allow them to find the school that is going to unlock their child's potential. And from a policy perspective. It really is important for bipartisan effort to

really Embrace this notion of empowering parents, and I know that my predecessor in this job really supported the Advancement and and and the growth of charter schools. And I know that in his heart, he knows that that's all to mately the right thing as well. We need to have a broad bipartisan Coalition, education should not be a partisan issue. It's really about the future of this country and we know that every child will do better if their parents are ultimately empowered to direct that education. And so, I'm I'm very

hopeful that we can we can get past the most Owner of impediment to that and and make sure that we do the policy to support parents and their kids. Well, secretary DeVos, thank you very much for sharing this time, and I very much agree that empowering parents to have the ability to choose a great tuition preschool, for their child, is probably one of the greatest levers we have is his as a society from, for all of our kids can reach their potential. So, on that

note. Thank you very much, and please stay tuned. We're about to have part two of our conversation. And my Great Khali Nina Reeves to leave the national Charter School Association will be interviewing secretary Arne. Duncan. Thank you very much. Hello and welcome to the second part of our discussion about K-12 education in the time of my honor to welcome secretary to this discussion as well. Probably about the pandemic, the impact it has had on our K-12 system and where you think the state of our education system is at this very moment.

Let me see if it's been a devastating time on a heartbreaking time. And I've said repeatedly, this was a natural disaster that morphed into a man-made catastrophe. The fact that we have tens of millions of kids out of school today. It didn't have to be this way. Had we taken too seriously had? We is the country had leadership at the federal level in February, March and April May and June and July. I'm going to be back in school. Now. I'm very naive lady. I was pushing forward to the National summer school coming out of the 4th of July Holiday, Inn deal in March for kids needed. But

that's that's not where we are and just the level of Devastation pretty extraordinary, but for all the lack of leadership, unbelievable urgency and humility and collaboration of local leaders who worked unbelievably hard throughout this pandemic. But you don't anymore at the Department of Education when the last economic crisis. Struck at that moment in time to do a lot of Creative Education reform. Can you tell us a little bit about what good can come out of this crisis?

Yeah, this is a dark time in these kind of technical difficulties or its kids and teachers are experiencing tree faces of. This is real life. It's probably not bad for the audience to repeatedly, needed it for me to go, listen to return to quote on quote normal, whenever normal might have been, because it didn't serve, you know, millions of children. Well, enough across the country. So the question is, can we use this really, really difficult time to reimagine to reinvent education. That can mean lots of things. I'm just give you a couple different ideas. First. Obviously, we have

to close the digital divide. The idea that kids can only learn with an end of physical School, building pr55 days, a week, 6 hours a day, 9 months, a year, makes no sense. I watch the kids while they're cheering in the city Chicago, whether it's in Rural America Appalachia. What is a Native American reservation? I want that to be anything. They want anytime, anywhere and access to the device has access to broadband the internet. I'm have to be to pick what it's has access to water and electricity. Every kid has a passion are we can have a genius? We have to give him a chance to try to find it

and we needed me to do this before. But now obviously we have kids and haven't got back to school since the pandemic it because they don't have that says, that's Harper. I can, we can't afford to lose those kids. So we could have our national character to do that. I'm in there. Just a lot of creative ideas, beyond that. We should be thinking about me on any of the stuff. I just get to give you some thoughts. One is, I don't quite know why we have Summers off for a Previa body. And our school calendar is based upon The Agrarian economy. And last time I checked, we didn't have a lot

of paperwork in the fields anymore. And we know we have lots of kids who fall in behind significantly behind to the heartbreaking, to think very, very differently about the school. Calendar for kids that need the need more help. We need to think about is that Super sassy time. So historically, young people have passed algebra, when they sit in algebra class for for 5 days a week, 5 days a week for 4 year, just to pass algebra. When they know how to roll after three months

after four months. Maybe just after nine months, after 12 months, after 15 months. And then we also have to think about how we use technology to our best teachers, reach more students, and I'll just stay with the algebra example, rather than an amazing. Our teacher teaching a hundred or hundred twenty five kids in the day. What if they're reaching a thousand or ten thousand or a hundred thousand and that we were utilizing other teachers to do small group instruction in tutorials and that kind of stuff. So the things that we can be alarmed coming out of this. The final thing. I've been

pushing for really hard as a national tutoring initiative and we have kids, there are four months, six months, a year behind, we cannot afford to let them slide through the cracks. What is physically, whether it's virtually, I would love to see a major national security initiative to reach. All those students who need to help to catch up with low ratio to kids, make a big difference. I want to do that a scale. All of these things need a federal investment. Need a Department of Education Ministry. And it's pretty serious

about education and unfortunate as to wrap. You know, I also really admire the fact that it's after you left your role at the Department of Education. You went back to Chicago and one of the initiatives that you are involved in gang violence in Chicago. George Floyd. This summer was the second thing that struck our community, especially the one of your thoughts about what schools can do to curb the school-to-prison pipeline. And what advice you have to do school leaders, who are trying to deal with the challenges of a

diminishing afterwards. Yes, it is. Obviously an unbelievably complex and difficult and challenging time. I think we're fighting multiple Public Health crises are fighting the pandemic is you talking about, we're fighting a Public Health crisis of systemic racism that I didn't start with George Floyd. It has a 400-year history in our country and is not going to go away in the next 4 weeks, or 4, months, or 4 years. You talk about where this crisis, we're facing here in Chicago, the type of gun violence and then that the trauma associated with with, with gun silencer for

public health crises, but what can schools do differently to, to Halt the school-to-prison pipeline to answer your question directly? I just appreciate that were talking about it and often or too often. Once I had this conversation because it's an uncomfortable, conversation is very real until you two stories. You'll quickly that on myself and I'm not proud of, but just for the part of this journey early on my started leaving Chicago Public Schools. I went that was the New Deal. New York Public Schools, there's a new Police Superintendent. I went to him and said you guys are

resting too many of our young people. Your pipeline of young people. Got good kid. Let us work with them. He said, let me look at the end, we get back to you. And he called me back in two or three weeks later. I'll never forget this meeting the police shifts. Go from 12 at night to 8 in the morning 8, in the morning, to 4 afternoon, in the 4, to 4, in the afternoon, to 4, in the afternoon to midnight. And a shift with a vast, majority of students are being arrested was 8 in the morning to 4 in the afternoon and was actually happening was our schools for calling the police. To arrest

our kids, to sit like the ultimate got punched and feel the same. Well, that was the case of us. I had no clue and no idea. And we dug into the day that it was both fascinating and disturbing. We had some schools that were literally calling the police,, a hundred times a year. There's only a hundred eighty school days in the school year is basically every other day away. So we did a massive training, the principles. And how you think about discipline and always say the kid is acting out. The easy thing

to do is to suspend or expel her, call the police, to put them out. The heart of it. The thing we have to do is we have to deal with a symptom of the problem. But with the cause of the problem, what's going on something going on? Call Neighborhood school, all the above. And we were able to significantly reduce the numbers of young people being arrested by our schools calling and never enough fast forward to going to be seat. And I'll be at the Civil Rights data collection process, which is a massive amount of data. We collected from across the country. And I was aware Nina of the

school-to-prison pipeline. Unfortunately, in from very personal experience, but is really dug into that that data and we did as an ounce of air holder. I was stunned. Absolutely stunned. It across the country. We were suspending and spelling, three, and four year olds in preschool. And very disappointment, young boys have car again, I had no clue. It is mind-boggling to me. So I knew about the school-to-prison pipeline. I knew about it at the high school level. I knew about the middle school-level. I have no clue that started before. I told her never hit kindergarten. So just really

acknowledge these hard truth. Looking at the fast, looking at evidence and then changing pad. You're thinking about being bias, implicit bias, whatever might be understanding, what's happening. This pushing us to to not kids out of school, back into the street and stepped in my phone. At school to prison Pipeline, and be willing to challenge that and hold myself accountable every year for making progress. That's the only way I know how to do it here. Since President, Obama's administration interacted with Vice President,

Joe Biden presidency would look like and their outlook on education and if you have any insights into who they might name as the next Secretary of Education, We're two weeks out and just continue to work his car fixed and don't take anything for granted in it for me. A couple things need and want. This is not about Republicans and Democrats. Never seen election does consequential and I will say that education should be the ultimate bipartisan issue. For me. There's nothing Republican or Democrat about increasing access to to pre-k and get

my babies off to a good start. There's nothing liberal and serve about raising High School graduation rate that more young people are to be successful in college. There's nothing about your getting, nothing political about increasing college graduation, a great military by best defense, for the great Educational Systems are best offense and we should all be on board here. I'm just a couple things about then, you know, personally, I'm not going to talk talk politics and policy to, that's not interesting. You know, that's that's Muse, not the point. I will say that for for Vice President

Biden. Standing the importance of Education, understanding what it meant in his own life, and his family's life understand what it's like, not to be born with a silver spoon. In your mouth into the half to fight for the chance to have some Alfred Mobility. I'm seeing to it to the gifts that you did. A fair amount of traveling with him in town halls. If your high school to middle schools and Delilah Community College, visits with key understands how important this is. We can't have strong families. We can't have strong communities. We can't keep good jobs. Country if we don't have

a well-educated Workforce and so it's really personal to him and in for the front seat map to do half and that's her heart. That's a passing. That's who she is. She is and she's always chosen to work. I'm often with English language. Student. And so this is not like some other subjects that you throw to learn about. In understanding the less, you'll be there. Other issues that could really come from the heart and I was a bow for present Obama and Michelle Obama doing now for Vicodin Biden. Jill Biden. Thankfully, education's one that hits them at the heart

of the biggest intuitively understand and it's store nearly dig, dig level in. Dr. Bible, Jesus, the boat in her life's work to this profession, and I'm not to speculate on who might be busy or whatever, but I'll just say that I've just tremendous confidence. They understand how critically important this is. Is he trying to strengthen your bring back the economy, strengthens families. The only way to have offered Mobility our country, the only way to move people out of poverty by providing world-class education.

We are at the Milken Institute. As you know, Mike Milken and his brother-in-law will have to elevate it and the profession of teaching Awards and through Investments and organizations like the National Institute for excellence in teaching. We all know that the that the key to making sure a child as successful in pulling is a high-quality teacher. Where do you see that conversation right now? What can we do? I just text her and what can those who are watching this panel do in order to elevate the profession of teaching and bring the

kind of respect that teachers, have Singapore and South Korea and other parts of the world. Why I was saying, you know what, so many parents, having educated at home. I think teachers poles and never been hired for tickets and pepper private more appreciative for the, the complexity and the difficulty of their work. And I'll see my heart goes out to Educators across the country, who would try to teach and raise their own kids at home, on a teaching, a class for the kids all day. It's so unbelievably challenging time and really difficult time and I just think whatever we can do to help

take care of teachers to support them. To listen to the very real challenges that did everybody's facing to meet their social emotional needs. I'm back to Newport. Now. I think this so much work. We have to do to elevate the teaching profession in this isn't a place where I don't think we got done enough when we were in DC but I will say it every level weather City, schools of Education, some of which are fantastic. Many of which are frankly ill mediocre. How we train teachers, how we measure them, how we compensate them. How we build better career matters, how we

better learn from mentor and Master Teachers. I'm a big fan of the medical model to a great teachers Metro and teach younger teachers before they enter the profession. I think we've done our teachers for too long a pretty serious, this service that far too many teachers. Enter the teaching profession. I'm prepared to do the job grass to do to draw the most altruistic people in the world. That's not their fault too. But we haven't prepared them for the real challenges of teaching the classes, 25 or 30 or 35. You'll diverse learn it from different backgrounds. And obviously now

with everything you're virtually is that much harder, this amount of work we must do to attract retain nurture Mentor Tapas. A better dad next generation of teachers if we move forward for the next 10, 15, 20 years. Since this is a conference that attracts individuals from the business sector from all over the world, you know, you are trying to tackle the challenges. We're facing an education there, a corporate social responsibility are more private, giving I know it's a complicated question and the business Community has traditionally played a big role in

moving around right now. So maybe a bit of an ass for even even a plea I might say Nina is did what I would love more from the business Community would be yes to part of us and education. But also to challenge up the whole accountable for us producing your young people who are prepared with the skills. They need to enter the workforce and I visited extraordinary community colleges that have Linkages with the business community of internships in Metro ships and where will community

colleges were becoming Regional economic engine producing? What when employees wanted the fox lot. And that's not the case. And I think if we business communities, I'm being, very clear. What I said, they're going to give me a call,, but your kid at 12 and high schools. Hear the skill sets that we need young people to have. And how do we help you? Prepare them? We don't have those sort of honest with difficult conversations enough and I worry far too often. If your businesses can now higher internationally, I get that, that's that's it. That's important for them to do. If I wanted to have a

real steak. I'm at the local level. I'm do we have high standards are high school graduates prepared. What else? I need to know what kind of skills should they be learning on when they're still in high school critical thinking skills problem-solving skills? How to work in diverse teams on the business to be pissed because education to be a hard a hard space that can penetrate is easy for businesses to get a little frustrated. Just Please please please stay in the game. We need your partnership, just need your philanthropic support, but we need your clarity as well as to what we should

be doing. Better to help reduce those next generation of leaders and workers that do a cheap brake jobs in our communities. Thank you for your leadership, and your friendship and your support of all things related to education and our students future, and look forward to continuing this conversation in person next year, at the next month. Thanks so much, and thanks for all you do. You should really appreciate it. Thank you.

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October 12 - 21, 2020
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