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Milken Institute Global Conference 2020
October 19, 2020, Online, USA
Milken Institute Global Conference 2020
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Resilient Infrastructure: Adapting to Turbulent Times
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About the talk

Topic: Finances

For too long, the conversation on national infrastructure has been limited to roads, bridges, and stalemates in Congress. This year, as the COVID-19 pandemic has altered the fiscal circumstances of many regions, communities recognize that high-speed broadband is an element of infrastructure needed in every home and business as a means of adapting to the socially distanced reality of the moment. Climate-driven wildfires, derecho windstorms, and extraordinary coastal flooding warn that it's now more important than ever to develop innovative ways of strengthening resilience in people and places. Cross-sector leaders will discuss pathways to 21st-century infrastructure solutions that will help distressed communities across the country jumpstart local economies and create investment-ready projects.

Moderator

Margot Brandenburg

Director of Mission Financing, Ford Foundation

Speakers

Debbie Dingell

US Representative, Michigan

Katherine Perez

Associate Principal, LA Cities Leader, Arup

Jonathan Tower

Managing Partner, Arctaris

Phillip Washington

CEO, LA Metro

Nan Whaley

Mayor, Dayton, Ohio; Incoming President, US Conference of Mayors

About speakers

Margot Brandenburg
Director of Mission Financing at Ford Foundation
Debbie Dingell
US Representative at Michigan
Katherine Perez
Associate Principal - Cities Leader at Arup
Jonathan Tower
Managing Partner at Arctaris Impact Investors
Phillip Washington
CEO at LA Metro
Nan Whaley
Mayor at City of Dayton

As the Mayor of Dayton, I am passionate about improving the lives of the citizens of Dayton. I truly believe that the city can be a partner with its citizens to lower crime, improve neighborhoods, and make Dayton the best mid-sized cities in the United States. I am committed to Dayton becoming a City of Learners.

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I know, please welcome all motivator. Good afternoon, everyone. My name is Margo Brandenburg. And I'm senior program officer for Mission Investments at the Ford foundation, in New York City and thrilled to be here to moderate a discussion on the current state and future prospects for a nation's infrastructure for a thriving society, and economy has suffered from chronic. And recently has come under acute stress from climate change, from covid-19 the budget crisis last, in the wake of the pandemic

in 2016. The American Society of civil engineers estimated that the US had an unsigned to trillion dollars in the four years that since then only a month has gone by without news of the devastating toll from another weather disasters that threaten our infrastructure and built environment. Pandemic, cuz of course I didn't you strain. It looks from the demands that is placed on infrastructure like broadband and from the massive shortfall of this is left in state and local budgets. New York City where I live is Ground Zero. For some of this boy has been sounding a

four-alarm fire for the finances of our MTA, the education of public school. Students. Like my daughter is jeopardized by an attic with the buildings and slow Wi-Fi connections and the state of our parks and other public spaces under visible. Strain, when residents needs the most of what I see. Everyday, the challenges to quality of life for racial and economic equity to the financial position of our city. Fortunately, a number of small people with smart people working on these issues

were extremely fortunate to have on this panel, range of sectors and geographies, and introduce them with their current title and fortunate to be joined by Debbie. Dingell US Representative for Michigan's 12th. Congressional district is congresswoman. Dingell. Katherine Perez. L a city's leader and Associate principal at the global design and engineering firm. Welcome Catherine, a boston-based impact investing firm, Jonathan Phillip, Washington CEO of Los Angeles. Metropolitan Transportation Authority. So

Married, Dayton, Ohio and incoming president. The US Conference of mayors. We'll never have time to hear all of this panels Brilliance. So I suggest we Dive Right In and maybe start by picking up on this question of man of mass transit. So you are the chair of the national Mobility recovery and restoration Force. What will recover a look like for transit systems in LA in around the country? Well, first of all, thank you so much for having me. I'm honored to be on such an esteemed panel. Yeah. I was honored to share the National Recovery and restoration,

task force for the American public transportation Association in the mission of that. National task force was really too old. First. We were looking to develop a path forward for public transportation preserving, the core functions and the financial stability of Transit Nationwide. And then, secondly, I we were looking to explore new methods and tools are in approaches to reinvent our industry. And one of the things that we put together in that task force was a health, and safety, commitments program in the idea behind this health and safety, commitments program.

What's 2? Play out of four Riders and the public exactly what they could expect from transit agencies in what Transit agencies could expect from Riders. And some of the commitments that we put forward to our Riders was to follow all official a health agency, guidance cleaning and disinfecting regiments providing information and resources to Riders and doing everything possible to keep a Transit employee steak. Are we also wanted our Riders to commit to some things as well and and some of those included wearing face covering maintaining social distance work, we're practical Bull and not

riding the system when they're sick. And so we have almost 200 Transit agencies that have signed on to this health and safety a commitment program. They were given tool kits. I where they could post emblems on their buses, on their trains, to show that their particular Transit Agency. Whether I was in the city or rural areas was were committed to joining this effort to convince. The public that Transit is clean and safe to ride in the last thing I would say

is in, you mentioned, New York, New York. I think that Transit agencies are facing an existential threat to the stability of their agencies, and we see this in the dwindling sales tax receipt that are out there and I would be remiss if I did not call on Congress to provide a second stimulus for Transit agencies in this country. Thank you, hard work. Great Innovation at the local level and then extremely early unprecedentedly challenging environment. You've been a real leader of on these issues

at the federal level. How can the federal government innovate to accelerates and leverage investment in transportation, clean energy, and other types of structure. Well, there are a number of things that we need to be doing as we talked about this and I do agree that we need to be getting the second stimulus. Donna's, we all are talking to you today at this moment in time, Secretary of Treasury and Nancy Pelosi or talk to me again, but it doesn't have anything in there about transportation. And what we do, give me to encourage or

to ensure that we're doing to protect mass transportation in this country. One of those things earlier this year in the house was the movie Forward after which was a very broad bility accelerator, which are sponsor of it. And I think that is one of these important that we can use To address some of these issues and had been included in other legislation that would help us achieve a clean-energy economy to meet this existential threat from trying to change that we all face.

And it, what it would do is by taking Public Finance and stimulating private and support communities, most affected by climate change. It would be funded with 20 billion dollars over 6 years, and fully fund funded could create as many as a 5.4 million. Clean energy, job will make more projects, economically competitive and more communities Nationwide. Can benefit investors the energy consumers workers and local economies that work in It. Mobile license investment directly into

grass, cut greenhouse gas emissions reduction projects and in need of capital, but, you know, and accelerator Capital who seemed like the private investments in. That's a really important. It's Bill isn't going to pass this year because we are at a stalemate, I could editorialized on forever. But we also which were talking about nasty and protection and all of these different issues. There's so many things that we've got to do to convert the transportation system. As we know it now from autonomous vehicle to electric vehicles,

California has gone to a hundred percent that mandate 52035 and we need to make sure we're investing in the technology. We're staying at the four front of it and we need both policies and Investments to ensure that we get there. Congressman, thank you, and thank you for fighting the good fight in Congress. And that's what must be an incredibly challenging environment. And I want to come back Jonathan to you and talk about private investment. But first, I want to go back to the local level in and make sure that we're not over-indexing and

large Metro areas. I want to turn to. You are way too late. And ask how, you know, when project planning for transportation and other infrastructure Investments. We can take a regional perspectives that allows smaller and mid-sized cities to benefit and to have this capacity to innovate. Yeah, and thank you for having me on it, preciate the soft and it talks about something that most Mayors from across the country, love to discuss which his infrastructure. It's one of her favorite words, particularly the message I try to share with folks setting policy for

communities across the country and we hope to someday have real infrastructure package that comes from Congress. But we also want to make sure that that is a package that is accessible to not just large city, but timid sizes smaller areas as well places that haven't really been able to compete with the bigger communities that have a lot more leverage and certainly Legacy cities across the Midwest. In New York in the Northeast have had challenges with that. That competition during the Obama Administration. We saw a lot of these

competitions or tiger grants excetera. Forward. And that there's a challenge with local government because the staff has been cut. So significantly since the Great Recession, as well as just the lack of capacity to really move these projects, or be able to take him pee on a, on a, on a national basis. So, really trying to make sure that were thoughtful about it. Being you no more formal leg base and also have the flexibility for each Community to decide what it really needs. And I definitely think we need to think of complete Street models and ways that we changed with with our

transportation sources, but we definitely need to make sure that we give the opportunities for cities like Dayton to be able to fix it first. And that is something that we have not seen for many decades here. Thank you Katherine. You have a perspective on these questions. That's both Broad and deep, particularly for more populous and densely populated regions like Southern California. How do we target infrastructure planning and investment? So that it's hyperlocal in the way that it responds to people's needs. Well, first of all,

thank you so much for the opportunity to participate in this discussion. I think what has happened is that with covid comes in a bit, from a regional landscape to As Nice a hyperlocal experience, you know, we're walking to the grocery store where biking to the post office and we're trying to figure out if she doing in La, what is a 15-20 minute experience. And we look at the conditions of of as mayor, Willie says our infrastructure, local infrastructure. He is very different based on the different neighborhoods. And it's very inequitable. In terms of the

condition of our streets are sidewalks our neighborhood and I think it is time of kind of rebuilding because we do need to rebuild our neighborhoods block by block. We need to look at those gas and I think what we also need to think about is how we are going to have to engage with constituencies in Waze. We did it before. I'm particularly after the black lives matter movement as well. As all of the issues that have come out of the discussions around race and and engender mean, one of these issues have brought up a lot of inequities. And what we want to do to be kind of come back

and take a look at how we could do what I am calling surgical interventions. How did we cities and regions work with our neighborhood, to basically build block by block and working in partnership with Community organizations, and Community groups? Because I think that's the best way to address an ameliorate. Some of these deficiencies that have happened over time. Ken is a resident of a big city that really resonates thing in my world has gotten much smaller and much more Salient

in my life than I went in a way that it wasn't before we have an investor Among Us. Jonathan, from your perspective on how can governments work with private Capital to accelerate investment in these types of infrastructures. Sure, that, that's what I'm from here. Isn't back. I swear, I austin-based, social impact investment firm focused on creating Pathways prosperity for low-income communities. Now, it's experience over 11 years 658 more than 75 million dollars and capital for resg impact opportunity, Zone platform launched in

2019 and recently announced plans to raise a new 250 million dollar Fun ticket to do the same impact investment strategy, very Community Focus. So if we look at it, one piece of the infrastructure infrastructure Spectrum take broadband Focus area for us. It's also an area that has a much greater need. Think about the difference between communities that have resilient infrastructure and lack of infrastructure. Imagine a map for a second of the United States and highlight all the different areas that have suffered most dearly due to lack of resilient infrastructure. Think about

the inner-city, the low-income rural communities that like a quad band and how they Affair damage the wreckage of 2020. And now, think about the picture, specifically, relative to Howell middle and upper-income communities have fared during this past year. Do these Maps look the same know what the course they don't, but but you have to do look, very similar are the map of communities. Lacking Broadband, infrastructure, and the number of communities that were designated as opportunity zone map, and the we don't have Broadband map. Look,

almost identical to striking correlation. So, how can I put Unity zones? Make it right? What's up, you might be asking yourself, and I've read about opportunity zones when you are times. It doesn't sound too good, aren't they? Just a tax break for the wealthy. It's, when they first came out. It was almost like after years of policy development in 2017 Congress, finally came out with a way for people to defend the system their way and know that wasn't the intention. It wasn't the goal of opportunity zones. Congress didn't want it. We didn't want it. But, you know, our goal here

today is really to harness the opportunity Zone tax. Incentive it away, that serves to bring together private investment capital from investors who realized games. And yes, of course, that means that they've made money somewhere along the way along with Community Development projects, that help create Pathways to prosperity for low-income individual communities. That lack of this infrastructure. They may be systemically pork and opportunity zones are one of the ways to reverse these Trends and build the empress. Rapture tract Uzi Equity Capital into these

projects in partnership with Mayors and governors who want Broadband infrastructure in their Community. Why don't you see Comcast vans in these communities already. The simple answer is it just doesn't pencil out. They can make more money in putting Broadband fiber in other areas. So going into low-income communities is not something that market forces are driving them to do, but we're working on communities that lack Broadband throughout the country. Right now, in partnership with the mayor's and the governor's who want this to happen, the way to do it is to

provide either a principal protection, subsidy or access to low income, debt financing, to engineer these products. At the end of the day, at Big opportunity. Zone. Investors are still taking Equity risk on these transactions. They have every incentive to make sure that they are good, but by risking the or Call platform it. It's suddenly possible to address these communities where the take returns expected to be low. Income levels are low and computer computer, literacy is low until we make the exchange is nationally for communities. Will still be left behind and unfortunately with

2020. It's a grown grown all that much more severe. At the crisis of a Broadband is very much. Reflected the crisis of so, we'd be see. This is one of many tools in the infrastructure quiver that you can use to address the infrastructure Gap in broadband. Jonathan you didn't mention, I think you told me 96% of opportunities on Capital has been for real estate in the sun. You raised as part of that 4% for non real estate uses. So there's a lot of conversation in the circles ice women live in whatever you do in a circle about how we can Drive

Morrow, Z Capital outside of real estate. And I'm going to start sending people to you cuz I'm used to taking a spare for those who are less in these issues than the five of you. It can you explain other infrastructure Investments, historically exacerbated, racial and income inequality, how infrastructure can be designed to maximize. Go back to you. So LA Metro pass an equity platform and you have a thickened office of civil rights and inclusion. How does Equity look to you and manifest and in LA Metro? Well, one of the things always point to is the

need for us to look through the lens of equity on. Anything. We do whether that is projects programs. Anything. We do looking through that lens of equity, I grew up on the south side of Chicago, I grew up in public housing and right across the highway from us was a waste though and the public housing was practically built on a waste Dock and we were always concerned that was breathing problems out there. There was all kinds of ailments and we suffer as I suffered at as a youngster. And so the shop, when we start to talk about how these communities of color are

being severely impacted in a disproportionate way in these two, I think this makes it very very real in terms of infrastructure. And the the fact that we should be humanizing infrastructure and letting people know what we're talking about. Letting people know in rural areas are in our cities. Exactly what we talkin about when we talk about equity in infrastructure. And so, yes, we have set up that a particular office to look at ways that we can make sure that we

Implement equity and all of our program, you know, we talked about Transit, but I also think about lead-free water. I think about the Broadband. If it was just mention, I think about roadway that, I think about climate change. I think about the electrification of vehicles. There are so many things that we have to do, and I believe that both the public and the private sector. We need resources from both. We need. Private-sector dollars to help Finance these great projects. We need the ability

and the learning institutions to help people become qualified to do infrastructure work there. So many things that fall into that bucket of equity. And I I think about this question of how do we really want to live? And what does a new city look like when we start talking about infrastructure in these communities, and and and and and when I think about how I knew City looks, I think that we must have mass transit. There'll always be a need to move large amounts of people. When I think about a new city. I think we have to do something about homelessness in our area, need to do something about a

foot. Mobile housing, all of these things, is what I think about when we think about equity and we think about the inclusion and we think about infrastructure, so much of the social unrest has to do with so many things, but I think the lack of good infrastructure and communities is one of them as well. Thank you and dingo. I think something. I just wanted to bring up something if I don't, if I could just add and I want to build, Jonathan was talking about, I don't think this is systemic. This is structural. This is what we have is a problem that is structurally not Equitable or fair.

And in Dillon, are lucky to be in California, in June, in LA county. We have a lot of great leadership with mayor Garcetti and they're really, I saw you the last us Conference of Mayors and I'm very excited about your leadership and kind of having that message for lots of cities around the country, but we're lucky because we've got leaders in the governor's office in here in Los Angeles that are moving us forward with coverage. But one of the things that I wanted to bring up is how we're talking about this because, I mean, there was an LA Times article when they

interviewed and unemployed restaurant worker and she was a resident in East LA, Boyle Heights and she said that the word recovery. She felt was elitist and in many ways racist, because she felt like, I don't, I don't even know what that means is to me. What we need to talk about is that when we discussed infrastructure, we need to think about what it means to have the permission to work in these communities. And what I'm saying is that, you know, for, for some communities, they see, Bill knows if they see a biplane coming, and they think it's the beginning of gentrification

displacement and dislocation for themselves and so should build trust the much different collaborative model that we've been down. We've been doing. And I think with this kind of time where covid has exacerbated, actual historic, generational conditions, as Phil talked about, I completely know about that. I'm from farmworker families and I know all about these kinds of conditions and I think we have what we need to do is reverse engineer, how we discussed the car. Crustacean about about entering communities and neighborhoods. I think we need to

really ask for permission to say. These are the things that would like to bring do you want them? And if you and if you don't what can we do to ameliorate the conditions that you live in because they know what they need. And I think we need to do a better job of listening to them. Slingback better for whom and because I was also important parts of the clean-energy accelerator that you propose to this plays out in very different ways at the local level. You know what

that structure. So I'm going to forever be. This washing a lot of times. When we say infrastructure. We think Roads bridge has a lot of the infrastructure in this country is equivalent to a lot of third world country schools. It water lines, water situation here in Michigan. It's airport. It's brought him and Broadband. It's not only not available in communities of color, but it in the world areas. It's got to be one of our top priorities because Broadband is something that gives all of us. As we really have a

Broadband access issue in this country and around the world. It's about it's about We had a damn difficult here in Michigan. And we saw what happens when you don't invest in that infrastructure. So we look at the accelerator and we look towards modern infrastructure is critical that the beat for all communities. And that it's just not, you know, this dog sitter at the top. So that we're all low income and Frontline communities will be our highest priority. If this comes to pass the

accelerator, as I've written, it would also be prioritized project, labor agreements, Insurance, living wages. Can't forget the pain that so many of these communities are going through and how do we address them in there at the front lines? And they're paying the price? And as we try to convert to a green economy, and they're also be kind of nice if it hurts the most. As we talk about it by environmental pollution in the past. Thank you. Well, we're broadening our discussion of infrastructure. I want to make a plug for green

infrastructure. I spent seven years building. A company that focused on Hurricane. Another extreme weather medication and we often think of infrastructure is gray and concrete and obviously green infrastructure, like wetlands, and oyster beds, can be hugely impactful and, and cost-effective mention Broadband. Sorry. Where to buy quality of life and climate in job creating Nexus, while we're kind of broadening. Our Collective Horizons about infrastructure and

Broadband. Does anyone want to live in the case for a brother types of infrastructure that are underappreciated or typically underinvested in their Whaley. I don't know. For you sitting in Dayton like, you know, when you think of infrastructure priorities that are less visible, what comes to mind for you? Will certainly Broadband sub a big issue here in Ohio. We had a wall around ten years ago by the state legislature that took away really cities rides to do any sort of Regulation around that, that's where Telecom industry work. And so it's made us very, very

unequal and it is basically and effectively a red lining of certain communities around broad bands and just overall Telecom access that. The second thing I would say is and I know the congresswoman brought this up that the issue of sewer and water systems is an incredibly expensive and Incredibly important. And we recognize, you know, there are needs to work with EPA and find ways to get our systems to be up to snuff. But right now being passed on to those

poor community members that can't really afford. Bourbon and water system and in some places that is sin against a barrier to high for these communities. So we really try to make sure that were talking about quality water, as well as water that can be afforded, and that's a huge infrastructure costs. That really nobody really talks about because it's Den on the backs of the the user for so long, but if you can't imagine, we've had this discussion, send me to the cross the country. If we don't get help on that work, you can see. And then, I

mean, an unfortunate situation where our citizens don't have access to clean water in America. I'm so I think that infrastructure investment into these Utility Systems is going to be really, really important to make sure that everyone does have access to Quality Water. Something that you know, you really notice it when you don't have it and it should not be tolerated. Frankly. So that's I think a real key infrastructure. Pretty going to clean. Water is

w. Can you mix with the water topic here? Because Wastewater management freshwater other forms of infrastructure? Are currently either funded by cities out of Appropriations, or Muni Bond offerings or by federal government programs, like ETA. And the key thinking here that I did encourage is not to replace the existing framework. But to think about how Mayors and governors could partner with opportunity Zone capital or project Finance groups to do that

work and hold those assets in private investment funds, that the city, or the state can still control, all the asset design them. They can take the general contractors. They can start rolling and everything else like that, but The key thing is, once you put those assets into safe an opportunity Zone find, there's a depreciation tax benefit that would have been wasted on a government owner because they don't pay taxes, but I'm moving a wastewater treatment facility into an investment fund. At least that fund can use the depreciation tax benefits as a means of reducing

the cost of capital to the project. So I think you do it standing that the idea Broadband is our number one thing, but expanding the idea at the water to annexes to public schools to fire departments to Public Service. Building things like that is is really an important part of the narrative that that we would love to hear more about from Community leaders. And I'm sorry,. Please go ahead, the joys of a dynamic conversation with a video delay. This covid epidemic began.

We told everybody that one of the most important public health issues, with the four people wash their hands and we have people in Detroit, with, in cities across the country that did not have access to running water. We don't realize, I do believe that access to water in this country and the world should be a human, right? And we really don't realize the number of people that's in. It was my provision in that first. Turbo. I said to Nancy, Nancy, unless you're being like them irritating or you're in a city and you're trying to

balance budgets and it's it's door systems and water systems that Sometimes I run by Bon sometimes your private water system. Serve variety of different mechanisms, but we have a crisis that people don't have access to run. We wanted we try to address that. At the beginning of water has been in Michigan. We got creative and a pandemic. Everybody should have access to running water for both public. Broadband in a universe, which I heard Wastewater. Anyone else went to raise their hand for any other types of infrastructure than they'd be

fully understood or not. Typically thought of when talking about infrastructure Wella, I know that Phil was mentioning. I'll just quickly a China and the decarbonization effort and transition to electrification is I think one of those critical not only getting job opportunities for new training a new skill development, but I think it is the future for many, many cities in California. Again, we are moving so far in front and we hope that some of that California thinking and

Innovation is going to sprinkle in Washington. We're going to have some some folks, kind of informing the decisions decarbonized economy because that's going to address some of these issues around. Obviously Health disparities are going to have a, we have so many issues that are tied to our kind of pollution conditions in the mobile sources. And certainly in La where we've got two large Port, Port of La in Port of Long Beach effort to transition is has Franklin been accelerated by the state and our local mayors. I

think of one other thing I would throw into the conversation mix and that is the essential workers that are doing much of the heavy-lift room in our economy. And in my case, in our case here, in Southern California, my agency, LA Metro. We carry about 1.2 million people a day on our system. This is pre-coated and 70% of our Riders are low income on bus the annual average in comments about eighteen thousand a year. Those riding on a rail. The average annual income is about twenty-eight thousand a year. And so these essential workers that road all through

covid. Going to the grocery store to work in the grocery store and all, you know, and hospitals and all of these things. What we have presented. I presented this to my Gordon augat idea of making Transit free for everyone. I believe in people, you know, who disagree course, but you don't just out there and at the transit should be paid for by out of the public purse like Library Services. I like fire fighting Services when we are dealing with such a low-income population who primarily ride our Transit

all over this country. The idea of a Fairless transit system makes a lot of sense to me. Our particular farebox recovery rate is about 13% of our operating costs. So we may be in a better position here in Los Angeles to do this, but when I think about and we talked about it, Pretty earlier, when I think about something like a fairly system. We're really talking about promoting social equity and we're really talking about expanding economic opportunities, and I could make a case that

that income to take a family of four, for example, if, if you got two kids, husband and wife, three of them, need, will have to buy a monthly pass for $100 each. That's three hundred bucks that month. And so if you put that back into the family, you know that could change and be the difference with from that family being in the homeless situation that could make the difference of affordability for that family. So I think it's we look at infrastructure and we look at other people that

really are the foundation of our economy. You know, we we To look at how we can provide relief for those that needed most in the infrastructure space. How can we do that? And I can even make an argument that, that extra money would come back to us in some way through sales tax through sales, tax revenue, that that family might spend on something else. And so I think these are the kinds of things that we should think about in the context of infrastructure that. And I think the

other thing is leadership in there for and the emphasis on implementing these things that were talking about today. It's I hear you say it was nice for us all to cheer for essential workers at 7, p.m. For some number of months. But actually we need to help them get to their jobs. Reliably and affordably, my colleagues would add. We should pay them a living wage Express through our budget and our decision-making. So I wanted to maybe shift gears unless anyone else

wants to jump in, the the delay is a little tricky and talk about messaging, right? And I heard you guys say, like, we'd love to talk about infrastructure Square messaging and communication can be so much serious about your experiences and talking about this, your constituents to the, to the broader public with compelling, what's difficult to generate support for. I was the public engagement side of this work in your experience. They're really happy. I start with you.

Sorry. No. I think, I think Vicky message. You know, why we like to talk about the underlying parts of infrastructure is really the parts that affect people everyday that we that we, I think our effective messages to the community was interesting to me about that now is typically that's roads and bridges and a lot. And you know, a lot of discussion about Rose and Vivid images or even certainly as wear a winter State, you know, the issues of potholes are a great entryway

into the structure and why we why we need the funding to make sure that we keep on moving around what I've noticed. Particularly because of covid-19 is broadband and we'll really understanding the need for a booth for Education Services to do their job for Telehealth. You know, it's it's become something. I think over this past few months. It is the equivalent to, you know, Years ago around electricity. So I think that's an exciting opportunity for us. Not just in urban centres like

my community, but is a congressman mentioned. He knows there are significant infrastructure and rural areas like in Southern Ohio, that needs to be addressed. And I think people are understanding that those areas are going to be at a significant competitive disadvantage or jar. If they don't get those, those kind of basis for their communities, two, people are really understanding that. It's a great opportunity to really broadened the conversation about infrastructure as a rule. Like we talked about every structure to color II for America on the piano between Mayers, the

Congress will use the word infrastructure all the time. It is hardly ever used community members. We want to be really specific about that the work that we're seeing and what what that is, and I think that's really important in the messaging of this as well. Thank you, Congressman. You wanted to get in as well? and what the issue is infrastructure and the governor of our state win her election by saying, fix the damn wrote Broadband because it is such a competitive and disparity in our children to broadband

access to technology computer the most Play sent by a broken infrastructure system. That people understand the importance of 16 are water pipes that the icing very broken and damaged water pipes. But also as I looked and there are many things we got to do, we're looking at 2035. I was here for utilities. And as I said earlier, California is going to 100% deaf mandate mandate for the year 2035, but he has to get to buy those. Why will they buy them infrastructure across this country in electrical charging infrastructure? The right now,

we can't have people that electric vehicles are more expensive. So again, And we've been unable to even get the tax credit extended. Do we need to be investing in batteries? That's got a longer-range. I want to see if I think all of us were talking about is creating those jobs here, bringing those jobs back to America building those batteries. Here. There's so many different components of it, infrastructure program, but one it's, you know, basic human

needs like drinking water. So we need, how do you people are tired of owls? And yes, they need to have access to technology for the for the vehicles of the future. We've got a chain. And even if we talked about that, and we're having the traditional conversation about, which has been roads, and bridges responded to a gas tax, which is going to become obsolete, because we're going to lose the internal combustion engine. So they're a lot of things we got to talk about, you put the human face

on it. You talk to people about a real-terms, you talk about out in text a personal life and how you want to make sure create jobs and keep jobs here. That's great. I hear you say speak to people. Live needs be specific focus on the job creation. Be anchored in the long-term vision for water infrastructure, 10 and needs to look like. You're not just next year, but in twenty years before the guests to the infrastructure for whom curious, you know your perspective on how this gets messaged and receive a community from the beneficiaries. Yes, and I appreciate

I think Congress woman has hit on a lot of kind of the point of putting a face on on what we're talking about here. These are real people's lives. The issue is right now and come to the public engagement. Arab the global company. I work for, we have offices all over the world, and we're watching and learning from other offices in terms of all the different kind of portions of the globe are responding to the pandemic and how technology has really shifted in terms of the public input. Right? So the big issue and and I think we're we're doing, we're

doing a good job. You could do a better job. The issue was obviously a limiting factor is access to broadband, but I have what we're seeing is a lot. More people are able to participate when they have that basic resource of a broadband internet, the ability to make the communication. As culturally as long as we stick with so that people feel as, if they are able to participate and the language that they still comfortable in and in a format that they feel is accessible to them. So that is the big challenge is to make sure

that we do have that Universal kind of almost as as mayor said, the electricity today has brought, right. So what we need to do, if you need to try and make that is available culturally and as I think, in terms of what's happening at the local level, making sure that we're understanding, these are real people and understanding also that you've been our old at what we're finding is that older folks are running Zoom there. So we're finding that says some of our folks who are at home or able to patch in, but I do think it's important that we we think hard about

how we increase our Broadband access. Call Lisa work in Broadband are going to be so thrilled that they've been before we turned on our way in, on the topic of messaging and communication. Or is there something I cut you off and had written me from saying before, Dad? Thank you. I got it. I think quick closing remark would be. Community leaders, don't need to do all of this work themselves. This is a massive Economic Development undertaking to cover Coast to Coast to the United States. Particularly. When you get to the most challenge

challenge communities, so the concept of Blended for dancing with government capital and private Capital together to deliver. A stated outcome is not really the timely topic and and figuring out exactly what the communities that we want to have served. And what will be the social impact criteria for measuring success is step one and step 2 in rolling out the carpet to make this happen. Just like the Royal utility service in the earlier part of the Centre run electricity at all. Your serve

communities. That didn't have electricity this Broadband wave. It's got to happen in. Good reasons and battery is in its going to disproportionately benefit the communities that adopt it first. So better to be in front of the wave and behind it. Thank you. Can I add to Communications, you know, we passed the largest infrastructure measure in this country in LA county, in 2016 call measure am. And we went out and we talked to the clergy. We talked to teachers, we talked to school kids. We were really looking

to humanize infrastructure much of what the other congresswoman in the mayor work. We're talking about and we were affected and we continue to meet with clergy are here in LA county on a quarterly basis. The results of that measure after going out and really Shuman, icing infrastructure, the concept of infrastructure and talkin it up two kids and teachers in the clergy was the voters approved. This infrastructure measure in LA. Downey by 71% clip. So we can do this.

They are 71% passing. A measure at a 71% rate is great. I think that anybody would be envious of that. So I think we can, we can humanize infrastructure, we can put it in the terms that people understand and I think we need to do more of that. Incubus a great example and just to be clear for 71% of Voters voted to tax themselves, right measure and was the sales tax measure. It's all right. I wanted to end if I could by asking or giving me a chance to talk last tax or big vision. And so it may be taking a minute each and love to hear the

item. That's at the top of top of your longest and most technocratic wish list for the delay is there might be no administrative. Other contacts changes afoot in the or your kind of bold and distinct statements of your big picture vision. And so you really inspired this, the big picture for how the city is that. We inhabit the universe, and anything more you want to say about your vision of your attic. Sure, I did it while I'll point the two things. The

first is a question of, how do we really want to live? How do we want to live in? What environment do we want to live? Good after structure, all access the first question. The second thing I think about is bold leadership and real implementation. We have to implement, we have to build what we've been talkin about and we need bold leadership. In order to do that. We need a plan. We need the qualified Workforce. I often I was talking to a group not long ago and I was

saying that if we received all the funding that we need it sometime tomorrow. If man has fell from heaven tomorrow, we got all of the money we need it. I would be concerned that we don't have a qualified Workforce to build and rebuild. Operate and maintain the infrastructure that we need to do in this country. And so I think we got to get busy doing and get busy implementing the, the city that we want to see and I either the last thing I would say is, you know, we are breaking ground on infrastructure

School here in LA county on this Wednesday of this week, a boarding-school concept, right? South Los Angeles in the old site where the riding went on with the Rodney, King School concept that focuses on kids in the foster care system. Kid. Joe's parents have been in the justice system and show the idea of doing in this infrastructure. Space becomes very, very important. If we want to live in a place that has a broad thing, hand and lead free water and all those things.

I love that. Thank you. I'm going to take the Bold leadership as a segue to you Congressman. Dingell. What side are your best? Wish I would say for the next Congress or your your biggest most animating vision? We've been kicking, the can down the road for too long on infrastructure. Definition of it. As we talked about today. I think that everything that Phil outlined is a great Ambitions, although I wouldn't count on a Manna From Heaven and dollars but she down, even if we do see a change in

leadership, but I would look towards a major infrastructure bill which will invest in all of the things we talked about as we needed to on that. But infrastructure is the foundation of our communities and we've ignored it for too long. So if the public is a public good in it, if invested in in our communities, if we give people I better start but give him a better Foundation. We give them a better quality of life. And you heard us all talk about Broadband today because David has shown the scratcher

in our society and Broadband, is an equaliser, not just education, but in on the technological, running with so many people are able to access from health care to even job skills that we aren't a hundred percent carbon freeze Society, 2015 United Nations together. And we got to find a way to put labor at the table to the part of these discussions. So people aren't worried about themselves, but we're paying them a fair and a decent wage increase. Jobs, and see if they know

they have a strong future in this country. So blue green Alliance for the for the century. Thank you. It looks like we may have lost Mary Whaley. Where did we lose you? All right, and that kiss, Catherine your I want to see an economic recovery that is Equitable. And just and I think if we do that, we're going to treat our people. Well, and we're going to recover all that lifts all boats at the same time as and that's what I'm looking forward to. So I appreciate the opportunity. Thank you. In addition to

adjust recovery, Jonathan anything else you wanted to put in the category of either your wish list for for policy? Another your work or your big Vision. Absolutely bird for 2020 would love for Congress to embrace the same side of a set of ideals that led to the creation of Judy umay for mortgages, but for infrastructure development, whether it be Broadband or public schools in low-income communities for Bridges and Roads and things like that, so they think he is really the set up a program of direct

lending and federally-backed Loan guarantees that allow these programs to take shape Pastor without asking the federal government where the states to pick up the entire town. Thank you ever so much more to dive into, but I see that big flashing, red countdown, clock fits, reach 0, so, I'll just end by thinking each of you for this Rich conversation. I can't wait to dig in more deeply appreciative of your time. Thank you. I hope you all have a great rest of your day. Thank you.

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