Events Add an event Speakers Talks Collections
 
Duration 24:57
16+
Video

REMOTE by GitLab 2021: The Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How of Work in a Post-Pandemic World

Kate Lister
President at Global Workplace Analytics
  • Video
  • Table of contents
  • Video
REMOTE by GitLab 2021
June 29, 2021, Online, USA
REMOTE by GitLab 2021
Request Q&A
REMOTE by GitLab 2021
From the conference
REMOTE by GitLab 2021
Request Q&A
Video
REMOTE by GitLab 2021: The Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How of Work in a Post-Pandemic World
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Add to favorites
364
I like 0
I dislike 0
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
  • Description
  • Transcript
  • Discussion

About the talk

Speaker: Kate Lister, President, Global Workplace Analytics

This session will focus on the broad range of shifts that will reshape not just the where of work in the future, but the who, what, when, why, and how as well. The pandemic did not set these changes in motion, but it did accelerate many of them. Though the tide has definitely shifted toward greater workplace flexibility, most medium and large employers are not willing to go fully remote just yet. The hybrid model most are adopting is fraught with challenges, particularly as it relates to ensuring remote and non-remote employees are treated equitably. This will be no small feat. Best practices for doing hybrid right will be discussed in the how’ portion of the session.

Get in touch with Sales: http://bit.ly/2IygR7z

About speaker

Kate Lister
President at Global Workplace Analytics
Share

Up. Next is Kate Lister president of global. Workplace. Analytics. Speaking on the who, what, when, where, why and how of work in a post-pandemic world. Now this session is particularly compelling to me because it's zooms the lens out and it gives us a bird's-eye view of the Ripple effects across the full spectrum of remote were so many of us have been fully immersed in work since the start of the pandemic, the closure of borders and offices worldwide. But what does the data tell us about how remote? Scale would

change our world, take it away Kate? Hi there. My name is Caitlin stir. I'm president of global workplace analytics. And today we're going to be talking about the who what when where why and how of the future of work. Advocate for remote work in flexible, work for over 17 years, but I want you to know that I'm not just an advocate because I happen to like the concept of remote work. It's because of the research that I've done and the results that I've seen in

organizations that I've worked with and for its really convinced me that it's the right thing to do for people for planet for profit. And for society said that I think every organization every team within an organization and even every individual on that team needs to do what's right for them. The desire for workplace. Flexibility isn't new surveys over the past ten years have consistently shown that 70 to 80% of employees say they would like to work from home at least some of the time. They show that they would take as much as a 10% pay cut for the opportunity.

And while the society for human resource management, reported that 70% of employers said, they offered remote work. The Bureau of Labor Statistics said that only 7% of employers. Did the difference was that of your Labor Statistics only counts those who offered to all or most of their employees. So it's kind of in this 7% privilege for the last several decades, reserved for the higher salary, the more educated employees. The fundamental problem is it managers simply don't trust their employees to work on tethered. In fact, before the pandemic only about 4% of the US

Workforce considered home, their primary place of work, or work there a half time, or there's this mismatch between who wants to and who's allowed to, but there is baby hit and everything changed. Going forward as we emerge from this crisis is clear. The genie is out of the bottle and it's not going back in. These. Numbers are from a study by the Becker Friedman Institute. I think it's one of the most robust studies out there since the pandemic over 15,000 people surveyed. But we've seen the same numbers in companies that we've worked with companies that aren't just making the

transition now, and in numerous other studies include, including some of the research. We've done ourselves. What we're seeing is that, among those with compatible jobs, Becker Friedman found that 27% of employees want to continue to work from home full-time. Generally, we're seeing something in the range of 15 to 25% with the companies that were working with Becker Friedman found that 11% say they never want to work from home. We're seeing that number typically or sometimes as low as 5% and never more than about 20%, the rest, want some some form of

hybrid and total 76% say they want to work from home at least once a week. That's not very different from what they were saying before. It's just now they feel that can ask for it. If boys are kind of lobbying for 3 to 4 days a week, managers are kind of lobbying for one to two days a week at home. But The Sweet Spot seems to be about half time and that's been consistent over the years as well. Importantly, it's not an either-or. This is not something that you know is polar as it seems that the media loves to talk about all. We're never going to see our colleagues or we're all. We're

all going to be in the office. It's what it's really about choice and that's was truly critical. As we think about the future of work, I purge all of us to do it with fresh eyes and an open mind, and do we really need to replace the water cooler? My husband has a saying sometimes, we try harder and harder to get better and better at things. We shouldn't be doing it all. Were your meetings effective before the pandemic, did the places and spaces that you worked actually support? The kind of work you were doing. This guy is wearing a headset, like a lot of people do and that's not an effective

workplace. Did your people have the right tools and technology and ended they work. Well, Organizations right now or ready? For a change? Like I have never seen before. So let's not miss this opportunity. To hit the reset button on practices and processes that were broken to begin with never having sex. Let's not, replicate those broken processes in the digital world. This is our opportunity to rethink, not just the wear of work. But the who, what when where and why as well? Let's start with why this is how my dog looks at me. When I don't have a cookie in my hand. When I

ask him to do something for decades that purpose and autonomy are related to Peak engagement and performance but few organizations really act on that Knowledge from Maslow in the 1940s to hertzberg in the 60s in pink and modern times. The message has been the same human motivation is not about foosball tables or sliding boards for free beer or even compensation. Giving people a sense of purpose, helping them to see how they contribute to the organization's Mission, tying that to the broader needs of society. That's what's going to attract top talent in the future. It's what will inspire

people to do their best work and eventually it's what's going to attract investors and customers. Chris Burgers. I said studied about two decades, after Maslow, studying human motivation in the 50s and 60s, his Harvard Business review, article titled, one more time. How do we motivate employees is still on the most downloaded articles about management ever published? His Discovery was that the kinds of things that create job satisfaction and motivate people to do their best work or a different than the things that cause dissatisfaction. In fact, there's no connection

between the two the stuff below the blue line. He get the wrong and your job, but once they are no longer dissatisfied making them better isn't going to raise their satisfaction and it doesn't go to motivate them to do their best work that comes from the blue line. So, for example, for working conditions, might cause dissatisfaction, but the greatest ones in the world aren't going to motivate you, unless you are intrinsically motivated by achievement recognition, the work. You could use the work. You actually do. You're a combined

herzberg's learnings with Abraham Maslow, who study the topic, two decades before Herzberg. The workplace in the physical places of work. He called these hygiene factors. If your office is freezing and your back is killing you, you're not going to be thinking about what you contribute. Contribute to the company's Mission and purpose are going to be looking for a blanket and some Tylenol. You can also think of the stuff at the bottom of the pyramid here as Wellness factors in the stuff at the top as what creates well-being and engagement these or something thinks something's

organizations have been chasing little success for many years. It's really hard to have a sense of well-being unless you are physically and emotionally, well, Most workplaces, don't satisfy, even our fundamental hygiene needs. We don't need a bunch of fancy amenities. We need jobs and careers that are fulfilling one that gives us in Dan. Pink's, word words, autonomy, Mastery and purpose. So what does all this have to do with workplace flexibility in the why of workplace flexibility will? These are the words that people use to describe why they like to work from home. Or

remotely the blue ones. These are hygiene factors, but the gold ones read like a chapter out of her, sperg Maslow or pink. And here's what they say. They like about coming to the office. Clearly, there's a blend between the two. Again. The blue are our hygiene factors as more and more organizations adopt hybrid workplace. Strategies is going to be critical that employees actually get what it is. They're looking for, when they come to the office. Let's look next at the who of work and how that is changing. The future of work within the word adverse terms of ethnicity age, life

stage gender and you can cognitive abilities, high-tech companies, for example, or finding that individuals on the autism spectrum. Have a great capacity for coding. Being able to work from anywhere is going to open new opportunities, for the disabled for military, spouses for people living in rural areas. And for others who haven't been able to fully participate in the workforce. We need to think about how to deliver a consistently good workplace experience across this diverse. Set of pliers. And that means understanding that people have different career goals and aspirations. They

have different learning styles and different social needs. And we need to not just understand these differences and accommodate them. We need to respect them. We need to celebrate them. And we need to leverage the opportunities that having this kind of diverse group at the table offers. Next, let's think about the world of work and how that's changing. It's a sure bet that the future will be more about brain power and less about Bron. But we need to do a better job of using science to understand what fuels the brain and what depletes it and align our workplaces and went to

work practices. Including the virtual workplace in a way that helps people not only do their best work, but live their best lives because they're strictly entwined, for example, to the extent that we get to use our strengths everyday, is a huge impact on job and life satisfaction, but how much of your day, the work that you do everyday, the things that you spend your time on our things that you don't enjoy that, you aren't good at or that don't inspire you. I call these kinds of things work play, sludge the stuff that gets in the way of people doing their best work. Organizations need

to do a better job of eliminating sludge. This isn't rocket science. If for years want to increase productivity and reduce employee stress. This is a good list to start with. Imagine if you got to do what you really enjoy, your work was optimized for who you are and how you work, best in the friction that often gets in the way of doing your best. Work is minimized. Your example. I thought I would love it. If I was working on a PowerPoint presentation and then the computer started to vibrate and said, you know what, you're not very good at those who could be doing this for you

and then it would just leave me right to that. Some people may not like the intrusion of that, but I think it would be wonderful. I think in the future, we're going to see an unbundling of work that will allow organizations to optimize the resources. They have by assigning those disaggregated pieces of work to the people or machines that can do them best. I think we're also going to see a move toward internal Talent Marcus. We're already seeing this in terms of companies, like hitched the loud employees to opt into projects on their own outside of their own team.

Given the rate of change. I think we we need to understand that learning is going to become part and parcel of what we do not just a day or a week here or a couple of weeks there. It's something continuously on the job and a result of all this is greater autonomy, Mastery and purpose. The winner of work is ready for a reset to being able to control when people work is actually more important than where they work, greater mobility and globalization will bring it into the nine-to-five mentality rather than the marathon work will be increasingly performed in Sprint's days will

become less linear and we'll work in ways that are more in tune with our individual body clocks and around the needs of our, our families are our personal preferences in the rest of our lives. To be successful at that. And with work in general, we need to learn to collaborate and communicate lesson quiz synchronously in real-time, get lab. And many of the other all virtual companies have already mastered us and we, we and other organizations need to follow their lead. Synchronous Communications happens by a chat through video. Conferencing for in-person

meetings even over the phone. This kind of communication is best for one-on-ones, for complex problem-solving for developing and maintaining social connections. Although I would argue that that can also be done a synchronously and for sensitive conversations. A synchronous Communications involve message boards. Internal wikis, email recorded, beatings collaboration, collaborative documents. And there's these are some of the activities that are good candidates for asynchronous communication. Announcements delivery of one

person to too many status updates, these kinds of things. The benefits of a sink include increased autonomy and accountability better. Collaboration that can come from the reduced hierarchy Level Playing leveling, the playing field from having a more diverse thought pool, and both of those things can result in Greater Innovation, async can also make people more efficient and effective with their time and making it possible to to break work into chunks and assign the best. People, the the for each piece and importantly, it can put it into

endless, Zoom meetings. All right, moving on. Let's look at the wear of work. It's not just about remote work, even born before the pandemic. Many organizations had already begun sinking of the workplace in terms of the ecosystem of places and spaces, both internal and external rather than going to one place. We would choose the place that we're going to work based on what we're doing in a particular day. This model offers agility agility through the up to the organization offers individuals, greater Choice, offers the opportunity for greater

sustainability and allows people to work in a place that suits them best. Offices are changing two occupants study occupancy. Studies over the last decade have consistently shown that offices are underutilized sitting vacant forty to fifty percent of the time during working hours, meeting rooms were wrong size. There were too many large ones, not enough small. And medium-sized ones. The trend was moving away from single assign seats to activity. Based strategy is where the emphasis was on movement, between spaces and working in in the kind of space that was most

conducive to the work that you were doing. The pandemic accelerated these Trends as well. With hybrid workplace is becoming the new Norm. Organizations are reconfiguring. Those spaces of the concert with the concept that people will be doing their focus work, mostly at home and that will be coming to the office intentionally to socialize and to collaborate. So the shift is toward more we space and less me space. Some of my clients are even repurposing their private offices as tea rooms. So over the last 10 years, we've been through this. Of D

densification and open office, but the new Focus really is on people employers. At least the ones I'm working with are generally looking to create environments that help people do their best work. And that includes finally taking lessons from science about coloring materials, and daylight Heating, and Cooling, and Air Quality and importantly, physical and psychological safety. The nature of these new spaces will increase, organizational, agility and resilience, but just making the spaces isn't going to get people to use them. It's going to take a change in

culture to to really make these places effective and useful. And then there's the how of work of all the things. I think that need a reset button. This is the one that needs it. Most how we're working just is not sustainable. Burnout is at a critical level. The pandemic has warned us all down from all the end is in sight. The return to the office isn't going to be easy. Either, the place you left is not the place that you're going to be going back to. There's the separation anxiety of being away from family and from pets, in both directions. People will be asked to adopt

new routines. All of this is actually going to add to stress. Obviously people are experience stress from a variety of parts of their lives right now, but in terms of what the workplace ads, here's some of the biggies overworking has always been a problem with remote and pandemic has made it even worse when it's right there with you, 24/7 is often hard to turn it off. We're dealing with life getting in the way of work. When were at home and work, getting in the way of life. We're stressed by the ambiguity of return to the office. The majority of companies have not even

announced what they're going to do yet. And so we have this anxiety about am I going to be required to go back to the office? When is that going to happen? Is it going to be safe and all of that? And it's a it's just a lack of control. It's incredibly stressful. There's also the worry that if I do continue to work from home, is that going to affect my career growth or or my colleagues not going to like me anymore? Is my boss going to be on board with it. I am I going to get the same raises that? Everybody else. Does. These are very real worries. When the problems with stress, is that

many of us don't realize how bad it is, until we flip. This is my nother nother, one of my dog's her trainer calls it trigger loading. She's fine with the first dog. She sees the second dog. She sees, but maybe the third one even, but then she goes that talk off on a kid on the bike. At work stress leads to absenteeism and a slew of other problems like these. Old practices are part of the problem here. Many of them are what's creating those 12 to 16-hour days. Although, quite frankly. We had too many of those before. The pandemic to we've already

talked about a synchronous Communications, but we also need new team understandings. Meetings were ready for a complete do over and we need to find ways to balance, the need to earn a living, and the desire to have a life all work. And no play isn't good for the employee and it's not good for the company. And we need to stop acting like those long hours or something to be proud of for the brag about, whereas, a metric for Company Success. You need to understand just important how important it is to give people choice and control over where when and how they work. So, it'll look at each of

these in just a little bit more to tell team Norms reduce ambiguity. They help people understand. It's okay to not answer the boss's email at 3 in the morning. It's okay to take a break after a big project. It's okay to ask your manager for help in managing your workload, your team. Norm. Should also include things like what tequila, you use, expectations around availability and meeting and Communications etiquette. Meetings of, as if we've said, were broken before the pandemic and like team Norms, they need to be agreed to even in writing and they should address

things. Like, whether attendance at meetings is often doubt. I suggest you do opt out to the extent possible. This puts the responsibility on the individual for deciding whether or not they really need to be there or whether or not they might be able to attend to look at the recording. You should agree on whether or not the meetings will start on time. I've got one client that starts all their meetings at 5 minutes after the hour so that everybody has a chance to get there from the the prior meeting to read all of these are just two examples and suggestions of things that we need

to be thinking about as we go forward. Hybrid meetings are a particular problem. It's mostly remote. Practice says that, if best practice, is that if one person is on a call, that's remote. Everybody should be not even the playing field. We heard during the pandemic, the people who were remote prior to it, or actually feeling more included. So we need to keep some of those good practices that we've learned and learn new ones as well. You know, maybe having somebody that's remote, run, the meeting having a buddy system, where

there's somebody in the room that's responsible for making sure their buddy gets heard. Again, I won't go through all of this, but we all know that biased that that that feeling of being an outsider when everybody else is in the room, sometimes you have to pick it up and they go to lunch and didn't even tell you, we need to avoid that. We need to ensure that there is equity in meetings and in all areas of work, between the people that are in the office and uppity people that are not In terms of work-life Separation leadership and managers need to walk the

walk and talk the talk if they really want their people to do this, if they're in the office early and they leave late every day. And that's what their people would do. If they really want to encourage work-from-home. They need to set the standard. Otherwise, people are going to come in because they think you're missing out. We need to give them permission to use these new spaces, the social spaces of work and not have them feel like they're goofing off. If there is sitting on a sofa, having a cup of coffee with a colleague in the virtual world. We also need to have boundaries and we all

need to take responsibility for managing them. Some people create rituals, like closing the office door. If you happen to be lucky enough to have a separate room or taking the dog for a walk. I know one person that gets in the car and drives around the block and parts back in front of their home at the end of the date, it to sort of distinguish between work life and home life. I think there's a silver lining to the pandemic but I think one is empathy. We need to hold on to that when we're sitting there looking at the the CEO of the company in his

armchair with his dog. That just makes him a whole person. And we need to treat each other like old people and understand that they bring their whole selves to work. I'm also a big believer in having no meeting days. I use an app called Collins, leave it but it's just been transformative. When somebody wants to meet with me. I send them an invite that or a link where they can book of 20 minutes or 40 minutes or a 50-minute meeting and calendly knows that I want 15 minutes between my meetings. I don't want any more than 7 a day before this time. Or

after that time. It's it's just made a huge difference in my life. So let's remember that. This is a journey and it's one that's foreign to all of us. We don't know how this is all going to work out. There will be blank quarters, but I truly believe that we're going to emerge from this crisis in a far better place than where we started. Finally, I want to thank get lab for holding this conference and for leading the way. And so, openly sharing what they have learned about making remote work work better. Thank you.

Cackle comments for the website

Buy this talk

Access to the talk “REMOTE by GitLab 2021: The Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How of Work in a Post-Pandemic World”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Ticket

Get access to all videos “REMOTE by GitLab 2021”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Ticket

Interested in topic “IT & Technology”?

You might be interested in videos from this event

November 9 - 17, 2020
Online
50
55
future of ux, behavioral science, design engineering, design systems, design thinking process, new product, partnership, product design, the global experience summit 2020, ux research

Similar talks

Annie Dean
Director of Remote Work at Facebook
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Prithwiraj (Raj) Choudhury
Lumry Family Associate Professor at Harvard Business School
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Daisy Linden
Employee Experience & Remote-First at Coinbase
+ 1 speaker
Dominique Baillet
HR Enablement at Coinbase
+ 1 speaker
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Buy this video

Video
Access to the talk “REMOTE by GitLab 2021: The Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How of Work in a Post-Pandemic World”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Conference Cast

With ConferenceCast.tv, you get access to our library of the world's best conference talks.

Conference Cast
945 conferences
37654 speakers
14367 hours of content