Events Add an event Speakers Talks Collections
 
Buildable Backyards Real Estate Summit 2021
June 22, 2021, Online, USA
Buildable Backyards Real Estate Summit 2021
Request Q&A
Request Q&A
Video
Buildable Backyards Real Estate Summit: Concurrent Session # 2 Innovative Development & Design
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Add to favorites
6
I like 0
I dislike 0
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
  • Description
  • Transcript
  • Discussion

About the talk

Let’s see that ADU! What are the development options for ADUs and how can they be used? Accessory Dwelling Units are anything but boring. From custom builds to modular and shipping containers, ADUs have all the comforts of larger homes. Let our panel of professionals expand your vision of how ADUs can fit into neighborhoods nationwide.

About speakers

Wanona Satcher
CEO + Founder at Mākhers Studio
Bryce Jahner
Executive Director at Haven Ventures
Yanitza Brongers-Marreo
Principal at Moody Nolan

Wanona Satcher is an urban designer for social good and CEO/Founder of Mākhers Studio a green manufacturing + design-build firm in Atlanta, Georgia. She utilizes landscape architecture and modular shipping container manufacturing as tools for equitable development. Over the course of her career she’s served as an urban designer, landscape architect designer, city planner and economic developer. Wanona holds Economic Development and Finance Professional Certification from the National Development Council. She has been a member of the Urban Land Institute for ten years, ASLA and the American Planning Association.

View the profile

Bryce was raised in the mountains of Western Montana. He graduated from the Thunderbird School of Global Management in 2014, where he received an MA with distinction in Global Affairs and International Management. Bryce has been a social entrepreneur in East Africa and has experience in management, strategy, consulting, and economic development. He has developed an extensive history completing difficult tasks with extreme constraints and establishing sustainable operations with long-term durability and scalability.

View the profile

"Pursue thoughtful design and architecture that inspires, supports superior construction practices, incorporates sustainable practices and improves people's lives and the quality of our environment". Yanitza focuses on the planning, design and construction of Mixed Use Projects, Student, Multi-family and Senior housing. Other areas of experience that feed this area of expertise include educational facilities, hospitality, data centers, churches, recreation, retail, art centers/ museum, corporate facilities and healthcare.

View the profile
Share

Hi, everyone, welcomes you to Innovative development and design session here at the little backyard, real estate, sign it again. My name is Sherry, tell him that I said manager with Germany, land trustees and one of your host for this Summit. We have some great panelist today who are I'm going to share their experience and expertise around design development construction. And still with us. Today is Nandita braungers. She is a architect and principal and director of housing with Moody, Nolan

Brice Tanner. He's one of the executive directors of Haven dentures and went on the stature, the CEO of maker Studio. We thank all of you for joining us in in volunteering your time today. So, without further, Ado, Winona, Alright. Well, thank you. Happy to be here. There's been a long time so good to see you again. And of course has been a few years since we haven't been back to Durham. So, looking forward to going back there soon. But Carrie mentioned are Winona. Stature IMC on founder of maker Studio, maker

studio is a green manufacturing and design build firm. We are headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia. And as far as our social impact work, as a social Enterprise on affordable housing in a core part of that is, how do you create an Innovative housing? You can shipping containers out of chair lift choice. And so it's not just a question of what we just hope that looks cool. What can we do to read help clients and customers a policy makers reimagine? Small spaces because yes,

I there is a crunch of space in our growing cities, but for us it's also a conversation around. How can we both operationalize internally attract? Those customers and clients whose values align with not doing any work. That's extracted exploitive or destructive opportunity for us using shipping containers. As our material of choice. Really is a conversation around his nose, nose circular economy and how to recycle existing material. How to make faction is this the materials for that? You have an opportunity to skill locally to

build locally and again to use and create more value in existing materials. And so yes, we do build a use for the purposes of this conversation and have a couple of slides, highlighting a couple of ratu projects. But we also welcome you back up. We relieve you a housing not just the home the structure but housing as an ecosystem. No professionally. We don't want to argue Texas, city planners, Builders real estate, Finance asset managers. And still, we looked at everything from now, but the

context with the Brady Bill, how you built for homie built? Who helps you build? So that you can create a more Equitable and just use your for those that are considered white. Give me a message to space is looking at materials, new ideas of biomaterials and materials. And so for us as a whole is the whole system's Design Systems way of thinking. But that's why I guess an ecosystem initiative also is economic and Workforce Development conversation. And so wise and shipping

containers, Andre manufacturing process. He's allowed to hire Tradesmen and traits women locally that they can build a change. They want to see right now. We are talking to other cities to scale with. We are really excited about not to hire a small amount of people in, in, in create more opportunities to build a shipping container spaces and they can help us feel. But in a way that makes sense for them in their geography location and also helps us to be able to scale our spaces.

Throughout the United States and overseas as we grow. So this is one of our first accepted going units. As you can see, on the left picture of very, very, very, very tight lot at those are be there from North Carolina. Community. Kind of reminds me of the neighborhood near a Central Park. The older a neighborhood and sell these homes know, back in the early 90s. You could have bought them for forty $50,000, now worth half a million, the lot's empty, lots of worth half a million dollars. So the MIT has been that you can't build affordable

housing in a wealthier. Communities is probably difficult to make the numbers work, but for us we can't because we deal with modular construction as a strategy. Now, I don't know how we're still trying to figure out how we were able to sit. One of our 40 ft container pies in this space, but our client wanted and an Adu Actually, they want an Airbnb, Lyft work in it. And when they told us our budget, I realize that they're actually rebuilding an Adu and so it wasn't something that I forced in a way or suggested that they build affordable housing. It was less than learn about what they want

and how do we then have a backyard approach to applying an unaffordable lens to what they were wanting? And so we ended up with our design build team building this shipping container one-bedroom one-bathroom home, a lot of the materials that we use our recycled materials. Not just the container itself materials, and we actually we're on it with actually at the end of Raleigh to look at our energy cost savings that just because of the small space. With the ever-increasing storm that we're having climate change. That's a big part of this ecosystem

that I was talking about earlier building, for those kinds of storms in her shipping containers are perfect for that. Again, through all these different lens is critical to creating a global communities and affordable houses and cabins to be in housing, affordability of what we are invested in that. We also from a business standpoint because of the materials that we use because of how we build a home. We build a tweet tweet. We really focus on aligning with the United Nations. They have a specific Lee, gold, 11, 12 98. And so it's really important for us to think about our work and

how we designed billing finesse portable housing. And what would those Partners to look at the system as the system that creates more spinnability? Again? Not just how you built. But from whom you build and who helps you felt. And really excited about this project. The clients were super excited. They didn't know how it was going to look, but we had a lot of interest in other neighbors coming taking pictures by but it worked out very well. The budget for this is one bedroom. 1 bathroom home at 320 sqft unit 56. Well, it started out $56,000

course. When you work with clients excited, we start customizing. Things are going up a little bit. But this was what we should do in a very, very, very tight or not. That happens to be a lie loaded in a community. That's not affordable. Standard issue, just an exterior shots, and there's some exterior shots as well of us. Working on site. Typical Urban backyard face of this is the second project to show. This is the first live in it that we did is actually is a 20 ft unit for a 60 square feet. In this unit B crowdfunded using iPhone,

which is an amazing crowdfunding campaign platform for women-owned businesses like makeup studio. And as you can see, we use is really as a marketing space, but it's built for a live working and it just to show you. How can this pit again in an urban lot? And I mention context is critical to this ecosystem way of thinking, right? As if you look at this is some of these pictures on the right top, right? You'll notice there's an apartment building is a little different than the last day to you. All that matters know how, how how, what is the context of with Natalia

building where you build and what you build and who do you, who are you attracted to help you build it again, focusing on our neighbors focusing. Those individuals that potentially could be gentrified in a very negative. White are those individuals that we built for, but also helped us build. So, our Tradesmen and women come from the communities that we built. They make the change that they want to see photos of the, I'm with that $29,000. A lot of reused materials, the wood space. I'm sorry, the red space window frame that you see their Ashley the burglar bar and we work with that welder

with a woman, which I absolutely am, so excited about helped us to reimagine using materials again, that environment as part of the structural, the aesthetic of shipping containers faces are. So, these are just some examples of shipping container where we get a lot of questions about the how viable or shipping containers in a lot of excitement about them. And again, we don't want to just do that. Our impact space. We also build a stomach spaces and commercial space as well. Is that in this unit? We prototype that repo type thing as a

breast cancer clinic very exciting work and section. 80. Use a great option. Not the only one we need everybody at the table. I am so excited to hear from our other panelists, but this is an option and we would love I would love to answer any questions you might have about shipping containers, modular construction and just, you know, the feedback that we've gotten so far from what we have done. So passing it along to our next speaker and I am going to start showing the screen.

Okay. Turn on. I think I am next. Let me get my screen shared up here. Okay, I think that's me. Find my so, what my name is Connor. I'm one of the executive directors of Haven Ventures and Durham North Carolina, and I'm going to kind of breathe through who we are real quick just so I can get to some of the options we offer for adus and I are you so he can is a certified B Corp. We are a social Enterprise but also very intentionally for profit. We are actually a lot of different companies, similar painlessly.

We are a development company. We also have a full design studio for architecture, and a full build stuff, and because we are gluttons for punishment. And our company really exists to work for individual welfare, but also Community resilience, and we do that through our built environment. We do try to offer a lot of variety and housing solution. We try to be very Innovative with the type of materials. We use. We try to be very restorative with ecosystems around our building, decreasing waste time for the close, the loop on our circular economy, and we tried

very hard to work to hire people with high barriers to employment. And because of our bcorp certification, everything we do all of our reporting governance. How we treat our workers is all third-party verified. So part of how we act in our community is through private development, but also through public-private Partnerships. We try to work to permanent supportive, Supportive Housing Solutions, and work to be super Innovative, and accessible with the types of financing. We try to work with and and for

with our clients and we work to for Workforce Development, with all of our employees, whether a tiring refugees, or people who are new to the industry into the sector were transferred. Price of the first Adu type. We offer is in private-public Partnership and we this is sort of new to us, but we're trying to work with different programs in both Wake County and Durham in Orange County to try and link up certain funding sources with different types of you, sand

different types of density in the neighborhood. So often Public public programs, want to increase the variety of options in a certain neighborhood as he can pee in the one, if I left. And then permanent Supportive Housing is another type of house and we work and where we have Services full-time on different houses and different properties for the clients. This one here houses. And this is an example of a missing middle pipe. Housing replacing both single-family infill, but also new construction

on small, Lots with adus on the back. This was our first project to try to deliver modular units on to these properties, while they were being built rather than trying to retrofit one on to a property. After they were built. I have some examples of these coming up, as well. As our first foray into adus, was in a traditional design. But with this is the foundation core competency our company. So the option you see on the left is one that's more of a flex space on the bottom with the gym and then a one bedroom

rental apartment above the unit. And so we seen a lot of this in our area where people are wanting to be able to use something as an office, but they're also wanting the flexibility to pay for that with rental in. The small option on the upper right is not a rental unit. She wants you to be living. This full-time and has a studio for her company attached to her house. So that that one's are also dual use. And then we're seeing a lot of single level interest. This is disgusting as a surly maximize, the 80 you but is very popular among people who

want to bring an elderly parents or who won the Asian place on their property. And so these are different options we offer for particularly on Ada accessibility. And then this year, we got into modular manufacturing predominantly because we've seen a real increase in our inability to get subcontractors and our inability to control quality and timing. So we got in the modular at first to try and innovate that that sector in our area, where there's not a lot of other people doing it and we found it. There was a really big

demand for tiny houses on wheels and this, it really allowed us to innovate and to work with different materials, as well as train people on a really small short projects. So particular in the lower Center picture, which is a structure built entirely out of phone with a cementation of material encapsulating it. So this was a a way for us to test a new building system for a really small amount of money and decide how we're going to move forward with it. We're doing several different varieties of tiny houses. Now they're they're short

projects and they really allow our team to the flexibility to hire new people that we just couldn't really give the time and focus on on a scale. But our manufacturing facility really is designed to manufacture these types of modules. This is a two different examples of a Studio unit one, which will be for office space in the other can be for small small, especially on a property. As an extension from that. We also do you wear units were there two models combine with one another

to allow for a little more space, but also to allow the potential for a loss of her. One area and really maximizes. The availability of square foot is in areas where I can buy cars with their limited to either 1800 square feet. And then to go further with that. We're doing modular development with three plus unit 3, plus modules to any unit. So this is an example of that where the couple wanted a place to retire and they wanted a really large chicken that was their requirements. Are we re module delivery here with a

site, built a structure, insulated panel. So some of the barriers were sitting in our area. I just wanted to touch on these real quick. One of them being a real lack of financing options and Sing a lot of people really have to dive into Equity to be able to to put these in their property in our area, the other being around the uncertainty of how to appraise these and how to Value them in the future. We're just now seeing some from Banks to back to assignment on how they're approaching

this. So we're really finding out what they're doing as as as they are in some cases and then in our area in particular were having a hard time really getting people to understand what modular means and as we show it to them. It becomes a little easier, but a lot of people in North Carolina, I think Steve modular as mobile homes. And so there's a real disconnect there. The other being a lot of access to sites especially cuz in our area are, there's a lot of old tight ends communities and a lot of people who would want and maybe you have an inability to

access their site through either the yard or through an overhead crane for modular. So we're having to do a lot of Info type design build, which were a lot of people is little bit more of a headache than the than the quick modular delivery solution in the last barrier. Was, he is really entitlements, and that's really just working with the city to figure out how they can allow us to put different types of Solutions, on one on lands, around around Durham, and around our area here. Matt is going to be quick there. Now. I guess I'll stop sharing

and pass out. Okay. Hello. Can you hear me? Good? Thank you for your patience. It's really an honor to be sharing with you. This afternoon. I really am inspired to hear from Wenona rice. My name is steady progress, director of housing at. What do you know that and I would eat all that is the largest African-American architectural firm in the country. We are very proud of that. Just this year. We were selected a firm of the Year by the American Institute of

Architects. So that's really a better with that. We are practicing housing director of Housing and we have offices in 11 locations in the United States that we're proud to say that what you meant. We have a project at their home or working. Also, we are very, very, very happy and excited about that. And With that, I must say they shove affordable, housing is a big one. We have really large projects that range, the $300 range for private developers, but a large amount. Maybe about half or more is

related to affordable housing in different eye shapes with you. A lot of renovation work. We also do a lot of lights. Can we have done? Several Choice neighborhood projects throughout the country. We have definitely explore that. You should, you know, the opportunities that modular housing allowances and a Ford us to, to do more efficient construction, and we have done a shipping container housing as well. And we haven't lost your employer. Those strategies not just as a single but at, you know, they shove affordable at large-scale.

Those are really great opportunities to expand upon So it's I don't want to share actually a project that is very small. On the scale of every year at the year to, to our practice that we complete, didn't turn over the keys at the ad, the beginning of 2019. So it is the Legacy house and if you can imagine what you're looking at here is actually was billed as a single-family home. But you know, if I was talking to Sherry at we saying that the solution could we be one that is applicable to potentially an accessible or an accessory

dwelling unit just because of the compact nature of it is 650 square feet. At what you see the pic that here is a double lot. So we work in collaboration with the Columbus Metropolitan Housing Authority, that donated a lot that was kind of in a neighborhood that, you know, it was empty and they are looking to build the neighborhood and I see y'all Kurt, Woody was looking for a way to get back to the community and he said, you know, we we don't date and we spawn. Do things every year, but I I

don't see that in fact of the community that would love to see what about if we build a house and we can talk later to a homeless family at church at many Architects. You can imagine how excited we were to the really build something. Imagine something that could really change. Somebody's life. This is why we can't see your slot, your slides at least somebody able to help me. That would be very helpful. Thank you, sir. Spiritos. Okay. Great. So I got a challenge for me to try to

advance it. See if I can do that is working now. I think it is. Maybe maybe press. Okay. So what you're seeing here is the floor plan of what that units or the house looks like. And like I mentioned, a 650 square feet includes both levels and you come in there supports the porch is not included in the square footage, but it was important to have some level of a presence at street level. Something really, welcome me as so that's how to open porch, you come in and

that's a living room space. That's a double-height space. We have a very, you know, small footprint kitchen but very efficient. We actually use Ikea Furnishing some cabinets to outfitted and as we were looking to do it for free, we we will also work with several partners that donated all the materials. We work to make it very sustainable. So we we use very high efficient, hva C systems. We work with soul orientation to really, you know, the best energy-saving. Sorry. Is the energy that you don't have to consume. So using passive solar

orientation was really helpful on this. Let's see. How do I forward which are you saying my floor plans now on your screen? Okay, there we go. So this is a really exciting day when we turn over the house to that family. We, we really kept, odors just got a very private, so you don't see any pictures of that they are. We wanted to turn the keys and let them really enjoy the house. It was a family select. It was a young mother with three young children to live

here. So we kind of decided Without Really knowing who the client in the end was going to be. And we work with that. Several entities to to help identify the family because we felt they were really the experts to to find the most deserving family. You can see some of the materials, very conventional. We went with a fiber cement siding of wood and stick Built construction. And we just really got very creative, which I think is part of the challenges with accessory, dwelling unit. Sometimes as we work with municipalities

having them, understand. What is the Outlook? There's a level of fear that. No, I want. This is about what is it going to look, how it's going to change the character of the neighborhood. So we we found ourselves kind of educating and even then we will receive some pushback from the neighbors who are not sure what this is going to be about, and we had to resolve the law because he been this weapon was too big for what was allowed in the past. So it was, you know, it was an uphill battle in the end. We were successful, but I did just comes to say that. Even with commercial

construction. There's always a level of educate share communicating and collaborating to maintain some projects take shape and happen. Let's see. Okay, so, so here you can see a bigger brother kind of image of the house and it tells a little bit, the story of the neighbors and the setbacks. I like I mentioned is $2 loss on it. That, you know, the lot was about forty feet wide by 80 as a pretty limited and he said we have two loads here. But really we use this as a way to Showcase that you know,

small Footprints and houses of this time really fit well in the communities. And now we got a client in Columbus to you. Don't talk about affordable housing, and really shut lights around the issues of homelessness and affordable housing. And I, like, I mentioned, we work with the Columbus housing Housing Authority, Ohio, Capital Corporation, whose arse indicator for lytic projects and Many other people in the industry that really made this project possible.

Here you can see how excited is houses. When we were designing the project. We always felt, we have to design it, like all of us in the office want to live in this house. So we, we made it the best. We could make it with several sources that we could have. Wait. We can't imagine that. These house could be, you know, it has a lot of my uncles passed but then Shelly forgot a scale it up or make it modular that we could simplify some of the things. But again, it's like the Model. T, you go through the different iterations of streamlining. What they look like and if we

have to do it again, we probably revisit some some different ideas. But again, we really wanted to make it the best possible in our stuff was really, so I can gauge that we, we furnish it to the last, you know, spoon and forks. And everything was really a labor of love from from our staff to 22. Just turn in the Keys. And be ready. We've been kind of feeling the refrigerator really, really exciting time for us as professional to really move forward and be inspired to continue working on the cost of

affordable housing and and so many deserving families that are struggling with finding a place to call home. The fast. I think that's about generally Rhapsody content of what I wanted to share. But again, I I completely agree with many of the points that Bryce shared and I kind of again currently working on. A project. I could you hear me? Yeah, we're doing a competition now to design a similar laws here in Columbus. We have invited other Architects and we're looking to build a affordable housing project in collaboration

with the city of Columbus and the land bank to build a house for $170,000, which seems like a lot of money. But we're really asked you all probably are struggling with cost of wood and labor. Shortages is still at a pretty big hurdle to overcome to design, something like that. And as I mentioned, the Legacy house, We asked Marina looking to build a legacy house on every Market where we have an office. So we have eleven offices. The next location will be Nashville and on that house that we're actually getting a little bit smarter and learning more, but one of the things that we're

looking to do is to build it in collaboration with the bank. So that these has said that is build now can be preserve as to an affordable home for future generations to enjoy. So again, we we continue to explore that puzzle, and I'm very, very excited to be part of the conversation this afternoon. Thank you. Thank you so much and excuse my poor driving of your presentation at the end, but we are truly inspired by buy. All of our panelists, shipping containers to module

modulator to, you know, making a smaller footprint home. That's affordable and even going, you know, to the, to the Last Mile and and putting food in someone's refrigerator that that's huge as huge. So now I just want to give you all a few minutes to chat before we get to the Q&A portion of the session. All of you mentioned a lot. That was that was great. But the things that stuck out to me was making sure it's super local and sustainable and also the circular economy, I think. Those are things that people don't normally think

about when they talk about affordable housing. I know we are as practitioners, but it doesn't come to the top of mine, but they're like, just give me a minute. I don't care what it is. So I'd love for you to, you know, someone to expand on what that really means in your market. Like how that type of Sustainable Building and thinking about housing as an ecosystem is working in Atlanta in Derm in Ohio. What's a good question of Saratoga? So I can start, you know, what do the bad think of the good news is bad news, but the good news is that housing

crisis is global and National which means that the solutions are highly scalable and that part of this part of the ecosystem. I was, I had mentioned earlier but with regard to our work and make her Studio, not just using shipping containers and be manufacturing. And recycling materials is also about an intercourse, working, locally and hiring locally. Don't flip out, healthy housing. And in the past, you've heard healthy housing, law relating to just having a fordable housing. But for us, it really is building housing, a healthy materials. The materials that are that

impact, everyone's lives and stakeholders last Christmas live in the very powerful and meaningful positive meaningful way. And I've noticed lately that there is a growing Trend and I think more of a sustainable Trend and looking specifically, At the materials, with which we built and looking at the shelf and what's your only duty materials cost as much, do they not all these materials? Great for the environment? Are they extractive? We are not into extraction as far as the supply chain materials, as much as possible. How can we lessen our carbon footprint for how we built? So we can

build more off-site on site that also helps that as well. So it really is looking at the kind of material that we're building with. How are we recycle an upcycling? Those materials? And how do we then? Now that Cher had to put all of those components together so that other entrepreneurs who are either in design construction or who might want a small space as a small affordable, small affordable space as a small business in a community service and they want to learn how to build their own spaces. And so really, it's about Making sure an arming local citizens and stakeholders how to build

their own spaces in a very Innovative, but affordable way at least four maker Studio. I think there's a few different ways. We approach the issue of sustainability, as well as circularity at Haven and get the beginning. It's that the demand is starting to finally catch up a little bit as Millennials are wanted to come home. Owners were setting to see people actually pull us in that direction, which is great. But on the other side, most of the people who want a to use have a lot of equity and don't even know what's really available in the market. So we have

to put it on them in a lot of ways. We sometimes have them honestly, sometimes we don't and the real issue is, how do they have? We paid for it? And at Haven, I guess we are solution. Is will take a small salary or take a smaller cut of the profits. If we have to, to make sure that the things we're putting out. There are things that we can really back and stand behind. And then as a as a team because we're hiring a lot of people who are refreshed of the industry. We can, we train them, how to how to save more wood or how I saved our products that they might just really easily

dump into the trash can and think a little better about recycling because really, it's not, I would say the thing. That's the most wasteful in our sights as the material itself with all the packaging that comes with it and most people don't care. Then just throw it out because it's easy and quick. So I think we've had to think hard about our customers but also what were designing but also how our team is actually build it and what we're doing with it and honestly, there's just not a lot of other people setting an example, so they could kick even know what to do. So, a lot of times we

have to front the bill ourselves. I'm just make our make our own path, and honestly, we're happy to do it. Yeah, I agree with all of you. I think you know it my experience whenever I talk about accessible dwelling units. I think my opinion is that we must talk about sustainability first. If we really want to sell this idea to cities and municipalities because one of the sayings that adus will afford US, is you are more efficient in the amount of utilities that you're required to feed that

unit. You're not, you're not, you're not building a new source, you're not at the extension of power grid. Your can use the electric grid on the gas supply and all the things that you have already locally. So you're in filling and your building more sustainable into the future. So I think that that to me is one of the larger kind of sustainability stories about 80 you. And I seen that, he's a huge selling point. I think the o Other piece that I look at it, when I look at 80 years is that? Because of the nature that is part of the definition of an Adu. You have a smaller

footprint, lesser amount of space that you have to condition. You know, if you want to plan that unit to expand with photovoltaics the power, your whole entire unit without using the power grid. I mean, that's really an amazing opportunity that you can provide for people that may not have the resources to pay expensive bills every month and it just for anybody, right, is the right thing to do for the environment. I think more and more. I feel the pressure of all the weather events that are taking place so many communities especially,

you know, other surf, communities that are going through. The burden of have been in floods on some things like that. I seen the world is changing and Empire. It has to do with how, how good are we with our environment? House off all. We are into the future and I think just because of so many things are happening. I think in the next I think now I see it but more so into the future. We're all going to be under the pressure, to design, a more sustainable world. And and I'm hoping that adus become one of the solutions to

get there. I definitely agree with you. I think maybe use are part of the solution, not the total solution, but definitely an established neighborhoods. Why not? She said, the utilities are already there. It's not any extra strain on the system. Wynonna and embrace you both mentioned, you know, reaching out to other entrepreneurs. Bringing them into your projects. I'm your subs and really that that Workforce Development piece. I'm just going back to that because I think it's important to highlight that the designing in construction

industry has a responsibility as well. And I think your your two companies are you know, just doing a great job of really bringing people in that traditionally have been left out of a larger projects. So, can you just talk a little bit about what that process is. If other firms, like yours are are considering doing that. What does that process look like for you? And and how do you even start? I can start off, think I'll highlight two different options. We used. One is on-the-job training with MC works on a many states offer that to

to get people involved in industries that they aren't currently working in, or maybe meeting to shift out of their industry. I'm so we use on the job training programs, as a way to help us fun, training people who are brand new, as I mentioned, before that refugees, but it's also people who have been laid off in the manufacturing setting or its kids right at a high school kid, who needs some training. So that's the one area that helped us out. The start and helped us really wrap our heads around, having a managers been a lot of time, a lot of time. Sometimes teaching people how to do basic

math. Let alone Skil power tools. So that's one program. The other company I'd say that we work with are the organization, that's doing something really great is not a Chapel Hill, hope Winnebago. They're training women who are new to construction and they're doing it in a controlled setting and they have, we've been partnered with them since their Foundation to try to whether to bring more people into just battle for us for it, with a for a day or or give them opportunities in regards to new employment or even just interviewing skills. So that somebody we

partner with you just bring other people into the sector who are traditional excluded. Yeah, I will say so we have Billy a two-prong business approach as what we do which which I presented the other pieces that you know, we are getting into this notion of redeveloping many light at properties as Michael manufacturing facilities and other cities. And so that allows us to hire more. Local Tradesman women to partner is really all about strategic Partnerships as well. And I sold it to that

partnering with those Community College. If I leave work with general contractors who work for professors here at Atlanta Tech, and those professors are great because we were community, colleges at that level. You have a really great intro into now. Only those that are in school to learn more about skilled trades. With my already, be skilled in those trays. In this new, little bit more education into, she would be able to start their own companies as subcontractors. And so again, you really is about being strategic and how how we plan our parade. Nnn and how we scale.

So that if our operating procedures is not include partnering student certain Partnerships. Atlantic Community College is working with organizations that provide recycled materials, like people that Source, those materials are local Builders or know, someone local subcontractors are being very Vigilant and purposeful and intentional about hiring women, who own, who are subcontractors about hiring veterans, about hiring minority-owned companies to help us build our Archives of. So, with that being said,

again, that's just the product part of it. And the service, the other service is redeveloping by two properties, in Saint urban communities. Underutilized Resort communities. I asked my micro manufacturing facility for that, then we can then work with other partners such as other partners. Other partners include major real estate, nonprofit developers in outwest, as well as we get more, people were interested in what we're doing. We need those Partnerships to be

able to scale that you did. When I was just sickly part of it too, is that yes, you know, building 80? Use is really a r. C operation is related to write the consumer for Makers Studio at the for-profit. Even though we are, social Enterprise is important to continue to gain in Revenue to build an income stream. And so we are looking to continue to do the direct-to-consumer. Provide a use and Georgia, Consumer products and services, but we're also transitioning to more of a betta be so

larger customers that we can use their Logistics to be able to get our products out, our stuff, little housing or 80, you are so. Turn arms as a very deep and intentional process to make sure that we hire locally and that we Source local materials as well. And that we recycle those materials. So really the cheapest regular component going so that we can get as much of value of a product that typically would be in end of life to now, not being into life and using those products in the long term. Great. I

want to get back to unisa because he said something really important, you know, working for a land trust. I'm always excited when when homes are permanently affordable, level affordable housing, but permanently affordable housing gets me really excited. So, I'm glad all the homes in the Legacy project will do that. Can you tell us about the reaction of of the neighborhood of the city to that house and to the idea of a permit of portability cuz I think that's really important. Yeah,

yes. Thank you. I ate, there's being such a welcoming effect. I think that's part of the Legacy house. You know, there was a lot of press and a lot of news coverage. So it really came as a very welcoming initiative from the city's part. As a result. Actually, the city has taken this neighborhood and it has put a lot of focus on it. Are firm actually continue to develop a catalog of houses that are in that small footprint as an initiative us an idea of what can be. Our major really has a strong push

to deal with affordable housing in the city. That is there's a major initiative to help fund projects that set aside a fordable housing units for the city. There's a lot of support to the lamb back right now to continue developing and as I mentioned, there's the Columbus next home 2020. Which is a design competition that looks to build another affordable housing of the city of Columbus is very much behind sponsoring that initiative, you know, strangely enough. The the the

Stars seem to be lining up because the city has embarked into a rewriting of the coats. So we think that this is a fantastic opportunity to lobby and have them include, you know, accessory dwelling unit to the current code. We are currently Reinventing Solutions on housing, for example, in Columbus. If you try to develop, I leave work unit, that's nowhere to be found in the codes. So we did a project that included, for example, leave work. And we had to get a variance to admit that kind of you. So that tells you like we're still

lagging behind on solution. Songs related to housing, but I think the city's really open to explore these ideas through this process. I was thinking a little bit, there's a community here is called German Village. It's one of the first I communities. That was settle here either. Were German Workers that came to work in the brewery here, in Columbus. And many of those houses are set up in a way that the, you have, they made house and behind the main house or Carriage, a curious building. Many of those carriages actually have been

converted to a secondary home. So we could you could really Define. I'm a success or a dwelling unit. So we really do have president in our city related to accessory, dwelling units and I seen that is something that is something we're going to be pushing to tell the city about, you know, why can't we really be looking at the codes for the sodding coats, a little bit more creative, creative lead to really allow for this so Again affordable housing is is just such an issue and we're we're happy that that the time is right for us here in Columbus to have this conversation

conversations with him are conversations with city council and ultimately bring this to a staff level. So we can start shaping the future of Columbus. Awesome. Thank you. I am going to go to the Q in a cuz we have about seven minutes left in the session and Thank you for answering these questions. I think that's a great great discussion. We've been having and there's been some a lot of answers and in the chat as well, but I would like to give all of you a opportunity to answer. So

one of the one of the questions is to what extent is demographic change, population aging in particular and those needs considered in your projects. It is it is definitely something that we can see. There is something that I started with accessory dwelling unit. You can really see how they could be very adaptable to, to change her life. Right? Like if you can imagine, you have your main house and that you have an accessory dwelling unit behind your house. If you're by the house at say you start with a young family, you can have the house and have your parents live behind

your house. I'll potentially, as you get older and maybe your parents don't live there. You can use your excessive drooling, in your dad, as a reputable, reputable source, and maybe as you get older, you know, let's say I leave at the house and I'm 60, and I'm ready to downsize. I could then. Leaving the accessories on and you didn't turn over the house to a new family to, to rent it. If you do it, it kind of, it could become like a lot of opportunity of demographic. And definitely I think when you design accessory, dwelling units that

we take into consideration, visitability, you know, is there an opportunity to design the dwelling? So you don't have to step in front of the house so you can bring a wheelchair it said easy to use for people that have, you know, physical challenges s. I a saint. That is something that we definitely have to be nimble at the same things that could be usable for young and old alike. Why we may consider putting me to use and a lot of variety of demographics, both with age race, gender. I think the big limiting

factor is finance ability. And unfortunately, most of the people who want me to you are people who are maybe younger, don't have an abundance of equity to finance, 0 financing really limits our ability to I think the liver these types of products to the, to the people who want them. The most, and who are most comfortable with them. And I know most of the people were seeing actually signed a contract to move forward with the project are people who are retired and who are wanting their, you know, maybe tell her to use an accessory as a place where the kids can stay when they come

in. So one really tough push is really trying to drive how people are using. The units are actually paying for but a lot of times they don't want it to make it affordable rental or they don't know how even if they did want to. They're so mean education piece that we push on our front end sales conversations a lot but really the ability to deliver to the variety of people who we want to is limited to their ability to pay for it. Yes, I did. I did write a response in the chat to that question. I just want to see everyone who's not following the chat. And and for all those who are

going to watch the replay. I can read you have a concurrent sessions though. I know some folks are going to come back and watch this and vice-versa, but there was another interesting question here that I also like you to to verbalize and that's about the temperature control in the shipping container home shipping container properties. Obviously, they can be commercial as well. So can you just quickly addressed that question? I sure do the quickest answer to that, is that Our pots are of heating are just like any other Home has

heat and air. That's the quickest answer. They are very comfortable. Exactly. Don't want folks baking. Mmm, metal a metal building. So that that is good to know. I think we've addressed all of the questions in the chat. There is one that is was for braids and I'd like you to verbalize that as well. And it says, have you had any pushback from local government on for delivering all your modular products? We've definitely expected to Durham is notoriously heavy-handed and they're permitting process. But so far, every conversation we've had has been one of

collaboration rather than aggressive push back and whether or not that's going to continue forever. I don't know. But so far our plans have been really over the top in the engineering so there's really been nothing to argue with him for a design-build company. We really know how to do foundations. We know how to do utility hookup, some how to express those, in a set of plans. So I think because we've been aggressive with, you might have information which time but they haven't done. They haven't really had of need to push back against us as we do multiple units together and

explore that more and more. I expect we probably will have some more push back on that but I don't got no. Thank you so much to each one of you for sharing your, your experience sharing. Your business has, this is been a phenomenal panel. I hope, you know, everyone in the audience is super inspiring, cuz I am so thank you so much for joining us for buildable backyards. But this is the end of this session, but we really want to invite you to continue the conversation by utilizing other who the app or website. There's places for you

to you know, start your own virtual meet-ups and share information. And just connect because we're all really learning each day about 80 use and 102 put ice maker studio in the chat, so so check out that website, but we're all still learning a lot about a to use it pretty, you know, a pretty young industry now that their legalized so I can see I encourage you to collaborate and join us tomorrow when we're going to have our day two of the little backyards. We have a lot to learn there as well. So thank you, panelist, for Julius. And also think

you are attendees, will see you tomorrow. Thanks, Sarah's you. Thank you.

Cackle comments for the website

Buy this talk

Access to the talk “Buildable Backyards Real Estate Summit: Concurrent Session # 2 Innovative Development & Design”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Ticket

Get access to all videos “Buildable Backyards Real Estate Summit 2021”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Ticket

Interested in topic “Real Estate & Property, PropTech”?

You might be interested in videos from this event

September 29 - October 12, 2020
New York, NY
68
1.29 K
covid-19, cretech, investment, iot, real estate, sustainability, venture capital

Similar talks

Alex Salazar
Principal at Salazar Architect, Inc.
+ 3 speakers
Aaron Lubeck
Designer at Aaron Lubeck Allison Ramsey Architects
+ 3 speakers
Zachary Sunderland
Executive Director at Haven Ventures
+ 3 speakers
Frank De Safey
President / Principal at Sequence Staffing
+ 3 speakers
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Susan Brown
Consultant at CoreSGB
+ 2 speakers
Sarah Brennan
Senior Vice President at Self-Help Federal Credit Union
+ 2 speakers
Abdur Abdul-Malik
Certified Residential Appraiser at A Quality Appraisal
+ 2 speakers
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Denis DeSaix
Principal at Metrocal Appraisal
+ 1 speaker
Abdur Abdul-Malik
Certified Residential Appraiser at A Quality Appraisal
+ 1 speaker
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Buy this video

Video
Access to the talk “Buildable Backyards Real Estate Summit: Concurrent Session # 2 Innovative Development & Design”
Available
In cart
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free
Free

Conference Cast

With ConferenceCast.tv, you get access to our library of the world's best conference talks.

Conference Cast
949 conferences
37757 speakers
14408 hours of content